Diary of Juan Labrador, O.P.

November 24, 1942

I talked to some trainees of the Government Employees Training Institute. A month ago, some three hundred government employees, selected from different offices of the administration and the judicial branches, were confined in one of the public school buildings. They live and sleep there and go out only on Sundays. They spend the days learning Japanese, listening to lectures on Japanese history and culture, and performing calisthenics and semi-military exercises.

The aim of these three-month exercise is to infuse into the government employee the spirit of the New Order and liberate him from all Anglo-American influence. As the official proclamations have it, the course is meant “to rejuvenate—spiritually, mentally and morally—all those who are employed actively in the reconstruction of the New Philippines.”

In another school, a group of teachers are receiving a similar training. After graduation, in a couple of week’s time, they would be prepared to teach Nippongo in their respective schools, imbued with the spirit of the New Order and qualified to transmit it to their pupils. Actually, the enthusiasm of the two training groups for the training is nil.