16th of February 1901

His condition having worsened each day, Mr. Lucas Camerino was transferred to Agaña Hospital yesterday.

Today, we were informed of his passing away at past 6:00 o’clock this morning. With prior permission from the Commandant, Messrs. Trías and Legaspi went to attend the funeral this afternoon in the cemetery for the natives or in the Catholic Cemetery of Agaña. R.I.P.


13th of February 1901

The following order was issued for compliance by our group:

 

General Order No. 3

Prison’s Detachment of Asan, Guam

February 12, 1901.

The following regulations for prisoners shall be observed, subject to the approval of the Governor of the Island:

1. Meal time for prisoners, as prescribed by General Order No. 1, current series of this headquarters, shall be as follows: Breakfast — 6:30 A.M., lunch — 12:00 o’clock (noon; and dinner — 5:30 P.M.

2. The prisoners shall be allowed to write and receive correspondences from their family. Letters shall be handed over to the officer in command, for inspection before they are mailed. No correspondence that is political or public in nature shall be allowed.

3. Prisoners of good conduct may be issued passes by the officer in command, allowing not more than one fifth of the prisoners to leave the enclosed premises between 7:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. These passes do not authorize the bearer to be away for more than four hours all at the same time. Neither shall anyone be permitted to leave the premises with a pass, without being accompanied by a guard or any person authorized by the officer in command. No prisoner nor a prisoner’s servant shall be allowed to go east, that is, at a distance of more than forty yards from the Prisons’ gate. Neither shall he be permitted to go west, from the first bridge from Agaña road to Piti, nor to the south through the same road at a distance of more than one hundred yards. He shall be allowed to go north only by the seashore.

4. The enclosure (fence) is a permanent fixture and whosoever attempts to pass through the same without due authorization shall be arrested. The guards shall be instructed to use force, if necessary, or to shoot the offender, if need be.

5. The prisoners and their servants of good conduct shall be allowed to move freely within the enclosed premises from daw to 9:00 o’clock P.M.

6. The sick prisoners shall attend the corresponding bugle call at 9:30 A.M.

7. A roll call shall be done religiously, three times daily by the officer on duty, one at 6:15 A.M., another at 4:00 P.M. and the last, at 9:00 P.M.

8. The officer in command or his representative, accompanied by an interpreter, shall visit the Prisons house once a day, to look into the prisoners’ complaints and attend to their requests concerning solely their welfare and comfort.

9. The prisoners and their servants shall be required to bathe at least twice a week and to be neatly dressed at all times.

10. The prisoners and their servants shall assist in the preparation of food, in setting the table, in assisting during mealtime, in washing the dishes and performing the general task of policing within the prisons’ premises.

11. It shall be the right of prisoners to appeal in writing to the Governor of the Island all matters internal or external, through the Commanding Officer of the Detachment, who shall file the appeal with all pertinent details as he understands them.

12. A copy of these regulations shall be translated to Spanish and read to the prisoners, after which it should be posted at a conspicuous place within the premises.

Mayor H.B. Orwig, commanding officer of the establishment, issued the preceding order. At the same time, he appointed Artemio Ricarte president of the prisoners, whose duty was to ensure compliance with the said order.

We were also informed that our being incommunicado was due to a petition by the natives of the Islands, who were aware of all types of abuses committed by the natives against the Filipinos imprisoned during the Spanish administratiob. We are more likely to believe this and we thank Mayor Orwig for his promise to defend us against the aggression of the natives, even at the risk of losing his life.


12th of February 1901

This afternoon, we landed in the barrio of Piti. Then we walked toward the direction of Agaña. Upon reaching the barrio of Asan, we went to a place which used to be the hospital site for lepers during the time of the Spaniards. Here we stayed in tents which were prepared for this purpose.

We felt some relief after having been confined for 28 days in a big cabin intended for the soldiers, unable to stay on deck except during mealtime and a few minutes alloted for smoking. I have gone up the deck only once, when we were already at Agaña port.

Our companion, Lucas Camerino, is still sick, having caught a fever on board the ship, a week ago.


1st of February 1901

Today, they boarded 11 deportees from Ilocos Norte on our ship. They embarked on the Marine ship Solace, which they say, is sailing for the United States. These men are the following: Roberto Salvante, Marcelo Quintos, Jaime Morales, Pancrasio Palting, Gabino Domingo, León Flores, Florencio Castro, Inocente Cayetano, Pedro Hernando, Pancrasio Adiarte and Faustino Adiarte.

With this last batch of deportees, there are now 57 of us, including the servants. This is not to count an Ilocano relative of Ricarte, Antonio Bruno, who came as our cook with a salary of 30 Mexican pesos.


Thursday, 31 January 1901

Until now, nothing has been unloaded from the boat, nor was there anyone disembarking, except the American commandant and officials.

At about noontime, they announced the arrival of another boat from Manila, which was believed to be carrying a new group of deportees on board.


Saturday, 19 January 1901

While we were already way out in the Pacific Ocean, the boat had some engine trouble and for this reason, we were constrained to stop from approximately three o’clock in the afternoon up to 11 o’clock in the evening.


Wednesday 16 January 1901

At about noon, the following prisoners from Malate boarded the boat:

Norberto Dimayuga, Juan Mauricio, Bartolomé de la Rosa, Silvestre Legaspi, Antonio Prisco Reyes, Doroteo Espino, José Buenaventura, Joaquín Agramon and Eulogio Gonzáles. Together with their servants, they comprise a total of 12 individuals.

At about three o’clock in the afternoon, the boat weighed anchor and we headed for the south, to reach the strait of San Bernardino.


Tuesday, 15 January 1901

At 11:00 a.m. we boarded Rosecrans that was anchored at Manila Bay. The prisoners on board were the following:

Artemio Ricarte, Pio del Pilar, Maximino Hizon, Mariano Llanera, Francisco de los Santos, Macario de Ocampo, Esteban Consortes, Lucas Camerino, Julián Gerona, Pedro Cobarrubias, Mariano Barruga, Hermógenes Plata, Cornelio Riquiestas, Fabián Villaruel, Juan Leandro Villarino, José Mata, Igmidio de Jesús, Alipio Tecson, Apolinario Mabini, Pablo Ocampo, Maximino Trías, Simón Tecson, Lucino Almeida, Pío Varicán and Anastacio Carmona. All in all, there were 25 of us, excluding the 9 accompanying assistants of the prisoners. Among them were my brother, Prudencio Mabini, Mr. Ocampo’s brother-in-law (Pablo), Mr. Rivera and a young son of Francisco de los Santos.

We boarded at about noon. Since there was no lunch prepared for us on the boat, we had to wait for dinner, as it was already late in the afternoon.

Nevertheless, I believe a number of us did not feel hungry then, for we were more overcome by our emotions that day.