June 23, 1942

People do not seem to understand how to organize a neighborhood association. They don’t read the instructions carefully. When they don’t get their rice, they complain.

The heads of families in a certain neighborhood may formally organize themselves into a Neighborhood Association. An association generally consists of 23 heads of families. Membership, however, could be more or less, provided that the total number of dependents will be at least 92 persons.

These are the steps:

1. A group of about 92 persons or more living close together may unite themselves to form an association, to be considered later as a “Neighborhood Association.”

2. The members of an association will be composed of the heads of the different families who will select a leader.

3. The members will certify to the Naric their chosen leader.

4. Every head of the family will be requested to present his residence certificate or his ration card to the chosen leader in order to be filed with the Naric.

5. The chosen leader will prepare all the necessary papers to be submitted to the Naric.

6. Every head of the family will certify as to the number of his dependents, such certification to be countersigned and certified correct by the leader of the association.

7. As soon as all the papers are completed and prepared, the same will be presented to the Naric for necessary investigation and final approval.

8. If the application is approved by the Naric, the association is legitimately formed and is entitled to receive ration.

The ideal Neighborhood Association is that which consists of 23 heads of families with four persons in each family, or a total of 92 persons.

On the basis of 300 grams per person per day, those 92 persons will be an ideal number to share equally one cavan of rice, since one cavan contains 23 gantas or more, and one ganta weighs 2.4 kilos.

If 300 grams will be allowed each person daily, a family of four persons will receive a ration of 1,200 grams or 1.2 kilos daily, or 2.4 kilos every other day.

Saw Japanese troops feeding their horses with rice.

 


June 22, 1942

Japanese authorities announced that the use of traveling pass by the public is no longer required.

Saw a Japanese officer’s car crash against a rig. The Japanese got a hold of the “cochero,” boxed his face, kicked his body and whipped the horse. The cochero lay on the street unconscious, his face bleeding. People looked on sullenly, angrily.

Somebody whispered. “Someday… someday…”

 


June 18, 1942

New rice ration plan adopted yesterday. I hope it works out well. It will meet with a lot of objections. People do not want rationing. We are not used to a regimented economy.

Tony Vasquez dropped in at the office. He asked me to explain the new system. He was breathing hard. He biked from the hospital. I think he is too old to bike.

 


June 17, 1942

Food production campaign not going on well. People are discouraged to plant. When fields are all planted, the fields are commandeered. Some are transformed to airfields. Payment given does not compensate for value of the products.

This is the trouble with the Japanese. They want the people to like them but they slap the people and torture them.

They want something for nothing all the time.

They can’t eat the cake and keep it.

Lolita baked a cake. Vic ate one-half.

 


June 16, 1942

Talked to Fukada regarding Mr. Inada. I told Fukada that Inada must be told to change his arrogant ways. He cannot treat Filipinos like dogs. Personally, he has not been rude to me. But I resent his rudeness to fellow Filipinos.

Fukada asked me to be patient.

The Japanese are thinking of introducing Hori rice. They are excited about it. Hori rice seems more glutinous.

Walked home. Walking is a good exercise.

 


June 15, 1942

Visited Pagu at San Marcelino police station. He was with Unson and several others. They were all thin and pale and their hair was cut short. I thought I would not be allowed to see them but the policemen let me in. They said they were arrested because of alleged distribution of enemy propaganda. I asked them how they were treated in Fort Santiago. They remained silent. I understood.

I promised to work for their release. Just keep on praying to God, I told them.

Talked to Phil about Bataan till past midnight.


June 13, 1942

Mr. Fukada ordered the removal of all pictures of President Manuel Quezon from the Naric. He explained that this was in line with a suggestion issued by Malacañan a month ago.

Presented my resignation again.

Refused again.

 


June 3, 1942

Military parade held in Manila yesterday. Lt. Gen. Homma reviewed his victorious Japanese forces. The newspapers say there were many onlookers. It was not so. There were very few and the majority were forced to attend the parade. The people did not applaud the troops. There was none of the usual fanfare and cheers from the crowd. Men, women and even children looked grimly, sadly. I kept thinking of the last line of Zulueta’s prize-winning essay during the Commonwealth regime: “And gods will walk on brown legs.” Were these the gods—these men that tramped in their ugly shoes and drab uniforms? There was something about the way they marched, a sort of automatic shoving of the feet forward, their bodies swaying to the left and right, just forging on and on, wearily, doggedly, fanatically…

I felt cold, like awaking from a nightmare.