Dec. 29, 1941

Weak on mattress. Got up to wash, then collapsed. Seemed to have no middle and my head felt queer. They called us all onto the tennis court and told us that if we did what we were told that the Japanese soldier was kind. We must give up all guns or tell where any were hidden. They had already taken all scissors, nail files, and pointed objects the night before. They seemed as frightened as we. They divided the men into one group, children and older women into another, and younger women into a third, and told us we were to walk in these groups to Camp John Hay. We were to carry blankets or what baggage we could. What we left behind might be taken by truck afterward.

 


Dec. 27, 1941

The Japanese army took over. They woke us at 11:30 P.M. and kept us standing in one small, crowded room until 2:30 A.M. checking off each one over and over. Finally, they herded us all onto the second story, where we all slept on the wooden floor all night. Mrs. Saleeby was allowed a mattress because of her age. About a dozen of us put our heads on it all around her, our bodies stemming out like rays of the sun. Many did not have blankets, and it was a firetrap. The Japanese officers came about every half hour with heavy clumping boots and sharp staccato talk, would look in, stare at us like zoo animals, then go away. A machine gun was trained on us at the front door.


Dec. 24, 1941

Received word from USAFFE to Sabe your command. Take to Mt. Trails” ordered Col Bonnett to take all PA troops with him to Bobok by motor, thence over the easy ten percent old Spanish trail to Aritao where buses would meet him. He should have arrived there by the 27th. Hope he made it. I personally took the CJH personnel to Itogan and thence down the Agno River and up the Mt. to the Jorgensen saw mill on Mt. Lusod. I sent the Americans officers and Enlisted men ahead and waited for the 43rd to come in from Kennon rd and Naguilian trails. When Co A was ready and Co B distributing their loads I started off with Lt. Gasperini. The trail was not bad as far as the Agno. Then it was sure hell. Straight up an old Igorote trail. There was a ten percent easy new trail but it was pitch dark and we could not find it. Our group hiked until 6:00 AM when we reached the first piers of the cable way from Station D. Heall Lumber Co. Here we found Maj Fellows, Lt. Simpson, and Lt Jensen. They had been sleeping since midnight. (They went on and our group spent an hour or two sleeping.


Dec. 22, 1941

Upon return to camp at 7:00 AM learned that Maj Fellows had heard that parachute troops had landed at Trinidad. He ordered the post evacuated and all communication installations destroyed. Also code books. Post was uninhabited when I got back. Brought the troops back from Itogon at night. Radioed the USAFFE by Bureau of Post radio in the clear but not answered.


Dec. 21, 1941

86 Japs transports visible in Lingayen Gulf. Took USAFFE orders down to Naguilian to Col Bonnett to have him withdraw all troops to join USAFFE. Bombed again but no damaed. Moved Mess to #14.

Had hectic night. Informed that I had been misinformed as to the situation”. Went down the Kennon rd. at midnight on PR to find out. I was right. The gate was blocked by Japs per information from PA Engr officer and PA Trainee det. Six of their 16 trucks had been captured.