Friday June 11, 1943

For about the 20th successive lunch, excepting last Sunday, we had beans, black brown or mongo, for lunch. They just put in a spoonful of camote or squash for the sugar value. Imagine a leveled tablespoon of sugar per day per man. The evening chow is pretty good, always stew, but a lot of meat—there is meat in the noon beans too, “Goddamn seldom.” Bill and I usually have some fruit at night or make coconut milk and cut up bananas or mangoes on the rice (left over) with a few peanuts and sugar on top. It makes an edible mess. What a time we’re going to have eating after this. I haven’t been weighed lately, but I’m pretty sure that I’m not gaining too much weight…


Thursday June 10, 1943

Messrs. Gimmel, Kodaki and Kuroda came up from Manila today and are staying to look things over for a few days. Worked in the Y today and find it improving to the point where it will (be) livable in few days. More liquor trouble. Monitors meeting tonight on the subject—certain incorrigibles are to be isolated in a separate compound, we mean isolated this time. No confirmation on the barracks collapse of yesterday, but it is probable that at least one did go down.


Wednesday June 9, 1943

Three more of the barracks blew over today, couldn’t see them from here, but it is said 1 in this area and 2 in the other flopped this afternoon. Not much wind, just a few puffs. In the Y again today cleaning, probably move in Sunday or the first of next week. A couple of fellows, one of them G. Ross, under the weather day before yesterday and two more today. Wondering what they expect to do about it.


Tuesday, June 8, 1943

There was a rainstorm with some wind about 4 AM today and as we went across the field for mush we saw that the first of the barracks, the only one in this area with a completed roof, had collapsed during the night. Somebody must have caught hell because Filipinos cleared up the debris and had a whole new frame up by 7 PM tonight. Wish we could have taken a picture of it. Worked on the Y again today, it’s beginning to smell less like a pig pen. Tonight the bus came in and that is another of my duties under “Safety and Order”: to see that the packages are properly taken care of. Lucky me, coffee, candy, peanuts, sugar and cigarettes. I hope you realize how precious the stuff is, particularly the peanuts and candy—starved for it.


Monday, June 7, 1943

Thorough grounds cleaning at the Y, in spite of rain all afternoon. It’s a mess and will take some days to prepare for habitation. Several hundred Filipino workers came thru camp this morning, truckloads of materials come in every day, they’re digging a deep well over by the hospital—they really intend to have a camp here.


Saturday, June 5, 1943

Another warning from the Commander that the camp is liable to be attacked by guerrillas. The info was passed on at a monitor’s meeting and Tulloch requested that guards be posted, apparently to keep men in buildings in case of alarm.


Friday, June 4, 1943

The Filipinos are allegedly evacuating the Y tomorrow and we take possession Sunday—I wonder? Calhoun spoke to the crowd tonight. Said you were very crowded at Santo Tomás and there were no notes allowed thru the line. Food prices had caused CC to request increase from 70-85 cents per day from J, also that the ₱50,000 from abroad, was to be spent on medical supplies and distributed pro rata among the internees. I’m going to be able to take Accounting and another course or two. Guess the History is mine, looks as if I’d have a student or two this time. There were U.S. Army prisoners driving the trucks that came in with concrete tonight. They looked well fed and clothed. Porky refused to let the laundry go out of the camp today—arrangements had supposedly been made for men to send out laundry, but I guess they forgot to ask the captain of the guard.


Thursday, June 3, 1943

₱50 came thru North today—I’ll try to stock up on a few articles and spend as little as possible. A couple of Filipinos were tied to a post in the yard for some offense or other, but were released after a couple of hours this morning. Nothing exciting otherwise. The chief topic of conversation is food, we don’t eat as well as under the shanty system.


Wednesday, June 2, 1943

This morning Porky wanted us (Americans) to build breastworks at the gates. Committee protested, so they had to use Filipinos. Built works of wood and dirt. Commandant ordered this afternoon that at given signal internees were to go to buildings, shut doors and windows and lie prone. There has been guerrilla activity nearby, town of Calawan raided and Mayor “bumped off” within the week; apparently they expect trouble. Not much activity other than routine here. The building program has a long way to go yet. I love you.