August 14, 1945, Tuesday

The Lieutenant came and told us that Admiral Nimitz is now conferring with the Japanese officials, probably on the terms of the Armistice. Some consider this a blow to MacArthur as he must have been expecting that he would be the one to sign the Armistice agreement and to receive the surrender of Japan.

The Lieutenant also told us that the Domei had been communicating in code with all radio stations controlled by the Japanese. We suspected that instructions concerning the war are being transmitted.

To Mr. Damaso Verga: “Friendship that has blossomed in martyrdom is more enduring. You can, therefore, rest assured of my everlasting friendship.”

To Prof. Aurelio Alvero: “It has not all been martyrdom in this prison. Within its confines, we learned many things which would be of great value to us in the future. We have fathomed the heart of the masses, now convinced that they beat in unison with ours, so far as love of country is concerned. Therein had been woven the friendship which shall be everlasting. And finally therein we have discovered the wealth and potentiality of the Tagalog language. To you, Mr. Alvero, my warmest congratulations and my fervent prayer that you enjoy a long life for the preservation and development of our national language.”

To Mr. Soberano: “Let this be a happy remembrance of our comradeship and friendship cemented by our common suffering in this prison.”


15th day, January 11,1945

We are still here waiting. Gen. McArthur is still busy. Why be impatient? We might be landed in Manila instead of Leyte. Everything happens for the best, as Joe used to say.

The tuba in Col. Abcede’s place has put my stomach on the blink. Well, but Dr. Sevilla has given me already the pill to get it back in shape.

My name went on the air again from the USA. I feel embarrassed instead of being elated over it.

Hail Gen. McArthur and Adm. Nimitz for the successful landing of American forces in Lingayen! Mabuhay!

Quezon if he only knew what’s going on, he would break out of his grave and join Gen. McArthur.

It can’t all be glory for him, after all.


October 5, 1944 – Thursday

Arrived Hickham Field Honolulu at 6:40 a.m. Admiral Nimitz and his chief of staff Admiral McMaster, Lieutenant General Richardson, Commander General of the region and Brigadier General Ryan, Commander ATC, were at the field to meet me. They accompanied me to the guest house where the President, myself, Colonel Melchor & Captain Madrigal were installed. At 10 a.m. we took off from Hickham Field for Kwajalein. Landed at Kwajalein at 7:30 p.m. Admiral Barnard, Brigadier General Cross ATC and a Major General of the U.S Marines were at the field to greet us. Then we boarded the Admiral’s launch and went to another island where his headquarters are. It was a twenty minute trip which was very welcome as the night was hot & sticky. This is the first atoll I have seen and I was deeply impressed. It is the largest and it consists of a central lagoon 300 square miles in size, surrounded by islands. In his quarters the Admiral served beer and Coca-Cola. I took the latter. Shortly after Commander Peabody, of the Peabody Conservatory of Music and four other musicians gave us an impromptu concert which was very entertaining. At 12 a.m. we took off for Hollandia.