October 10, 1972

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9:50 PM

Oct. 10, 1972

Tuesday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

10 minute interview by BBC’s Derek Wilson (London based in Singapore).

15 minutes TV interview by ABC’s Jim Giggins based in Saigon. He is colored and I like him.

Then 15 minutes TV interview by CBS’ Don Webster for the Cronkite show.

And finally 20 minutes interview by correspondent Mr. Saito of the Asahi Shimbun.

Practically the same questions on martial law.

ABC and CBS will mean millions more of listeners and viewers. I was able to put in the points: the landing in Palawan, invisible government, front organizations, urban guerrillas and better yet –that we have been fighting since the war– and our children will not fight the same battles all over again.

I attach a sample of letters and messages we are getting about the interviews –a letter from Tony Raquiza.

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Oct. 10th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Asked Ting Roxas who arrived only yesterday to work in the Think Tank and start on the Housing program.

Then met the generals for the command conference for lunch.

1. Explained the reform program

2. The rise of criminality in the Greater Manila area. There was a hold-up of Equitable Bank of more than ₱100,000 yesterday by three men in uniform. And Rudy Martell reports his paymaster was robbed ₱800 last Saturday night by men in uniform at the clover leaf at Epifanio de los Santos riding in a bantam car with number 32-45.

We agreed to pick up all police characters and concentrate them. Increase strength of Metrocom by 150 men provided with tactical vehicles for immediate reaction to reports of crime.

An agent Chua of Metrocom, a former or retired master sergeant, was held up last

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Oct. 10th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

night with the collusion of the taxi driver of the taxi he was riding in at about the same place by two men whom he had to shoot with his .45. He suffered a head wound from the taxi driver.

A carnap by three men in uniform took place the other day.

We agreed to push the clean up of the local police faster.

3. The trial by the military tribunals of the AFP personnel in gun running and the manufacture of the bomb that was used in bombing Joe’s Dept. Store that killed one.

As well as the Chinese manufacturers and dealers in heroin.

4. Military operations — I suggested that we catch the leaders of the NPA in a commander’s conference which I am sure they will call any day now. And since Isabela is now harvesting mountain rice if we stop the operations there all the leaders

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Oct. 10th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

of the NPA will seek sanctuary there.

So all units will double operations (except those in Isabela). Then we dragnet Isabela.

I attach report on the assassination plot. The guns of Osmeña have been confiscated — his houses in Cebu and Manila have been raided; so has his apartment and hideout.


September 12, 1972, Tuesday

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10:55 PM

Sept. 12, 1972

Tuesday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Hysteria continues because of the bombing, kidnappings.

Finished working with the governors, city mayors and municipal mayors on their requests at 9:10 after starting at 4:00 PM.

Included conference on Cagayan Valley, Mt. Province especially Isabela, Quirino, Nueva Vizcaya, Ifugao, Camarines Sur, Zamboanga del Sur with Sec. Ponce Enrile and Gov. Ramos on the unification of communication between Task Force Sar[  ] and Task Force P[    ].

All the mayors of Isabela have promised to cooperate against the subversives and insurgents openly, but they want arms and more soldiers.

Exercised with light barbells (40 pounds) and showered.

This morning I devoted to the National Security Council meeting from 9:45 AM to 1:00 PM.

I asked a written presentation of the expansion increases in manpower, financial and logistics [     ] plan, training, organization of the communists and [     ]. I asked the question of the [   ] [   ], [   ] [   ] to the communist program of [    ] and terrorism  and urban guerrilla operations for 1972. I attach copy.


September 6, 1972, Wednesday

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(1)

11:15 PM

Sept. 6, 1972

Wednesday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Imee’s grades in ‘O’ level in England is almost perfect. English Language –1 ; English Literature; Spanish –1 ; History (Foreign) –1 ; Economics –1 ; Geography 3 ; Biology –3 ; Art –2 .

I attach the report.

The Concon voted down the ban Marcos resolution by 155 votes against 131. Some of those who pose as friends voted against us. Carlos Ledesma, Angara (Johnny Ponce Enrile’s partner). Tiling Yulo was absent. Ditas Teodoro and Elizabeth Chiongbian voted by teller but these were not recognized.

Macapagal delivered a bitter vicious attack against us. So did Rama. But Sotero Laurel and Cuaderno spoke in our favor.

14 were killed in the Israeli kidnapping by Arabs as the German police ambushed the Arabs and their hostages on the way to the airport.

I have ordered our entire delegation to be pulled out and denounced the senseless brutality.

 

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Sept 6th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Last night 8:30 PM Joes Store in Carredo was blown up, by a time bomb of dynamite, killing one and wounding twenty two. I attach the report.

We lost one helicopter in Palanan, Isabela yesterday morning at 8:30 AM. It crashed into the sea because of engine failure. A Navy boat saved all the occupants. Only one (a co-pilot) was slightly injured.

Yesterday I told Rey Johnson of Caltex that the American businessmen are worried about their properties and profits while we, the Filipinos are worried about national survival. Our lives are at stake.

The message I asked them to convey to their American bosses in business and in government that we would like them to help us fight the communists. Otherwise we cannot help them.

This is the line we must follow.


July 6, 1972 Thursday

1:35 AM July 7th

PAGE 2177 – a

July 6, 1972

Thursday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Reports of a foreign submarine emerged in the vicinity of Digollorin River sometime last week and observed unloading supplies and undetermined number of arms and ammo have been coming to me from Task Force Saranay (Formerly Lawin) Additional information on this from fisherman and native Dumagats Fishing within Digollorin River and Digoyo Area, Isabela.

The first hard evidence on landings came from Lt. Aglipay, Palanan Detachment Commander who reported a vessel transporting undetermined number of persons to share worked Karagatan original were erased H – Akuryo Maru – N – 3 IT – 2005 which they boarded, resulting in a fire fight. The tug boat chief (they used a tug boat to board the Karagatan) was wounded.

One of the helicopters used to ferry two additional teams was hit in the rotor but landed safely.

I attach copy of reports.

Rang. Two depressions east of the Philippines.

Mindanao situation still violent. Gen. Picache sent to supervise SOWESCOM operations.

PAGE 1278

July 6th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Received credentials of the First Yugoslav ambassador based in Tokyo.

Awarded the Golden Heart to Col. Alfred K. Patterson, U.S. Embassy Air and Defense attacks.

Choosed ambassadors to Brussels, London, Spain and San Francisco.

Reassessed with Sec. Melchor and Cesar Virata the true market for cars. Possibly the true market is 30,000 to 40,000 cars because there were 100,000 cars sold from the U.S. Military Bases in five years. This would change the picture of the PCMP which is based on a market of 20,000.

Sugar – No reports without sale to domestic max

Rice destroyed by typhoon

Smuggling – the participants of Cong. R. Ablan

Air Rates increase only 30% not 45%

Oil Commission – To expedite Decision in August.

The Concon postponed voting on the form of government. The presidentialists succeeded in preventing a vote with the obvious support of Pres. Macapagal which infuriated Del. Miguel Cuaderno who may move for his ouster tomorrow. The parliamentarists were obviously (not readable) (not readable).


August 2, 1945, Thursday

We began a Novena to San Judas Tadeo, my wife’s favorite saint. She used to go to the Cathedral to pray before the saint. Paredes is the leader. He also has been going to confession. We were wondering whether he had left the Masonry in which he was an ex-grand Master and one of the most prominent.

It was reported that Cummings, when he was Attorney General, rendered the opinion that collaborators would lose their citizenship. The best legal talents are here in this camp and they all said that they could not understand how Cummings could render such an opinion.

We received another version of the instructions of Pres. Quezon. It was in the form of a cablegram to Col. Nakar, Commander of the USAFFE forces in Northern Luzon, which reads as follows:

For Gov. Quirino and Gov. Visayas, Masaya, Isabela. In reply your telephone re instructions to you in case occupation your province by Japanese, you must remain in your post to maintain peace and order and protect civilian population until Japanese take over government authority. In case you asked by Japanese to continue performing functions you should use discretion considering best interests your people but should be sure no personal or official aid and comfort to enemy especially its military activities. Municipal police should continue maintaining peace and order until relieved by Japanese but Constabulary should immediately join nearest Philippine Army detachment. In case you withdraw to hills or mountains keep in touch with Voice of Freedom, or another station in occupied territory or K.G.E.I. San Francisco for possible further contact with Commonwealth Government. Quezon.

The telegram was dated Washington, April 18, 1942.

Above is substantially the same as other instructions given, which I have previously mentioned.

This day the Lieutenant came with an American who was looking for me. I became rather nervous. It turned out that he was Mr. L. C. Ashmore of the C.I.C. I thought he came to investigate me. He introduced himself and he seemed to be very nice. He said that the Manila office had sent him a letter to ask me certain questions on Imports and Exports during the Japanese occupation and also certain business practices of the Japanese. He gave me an outline of what he wanted. I immediately prepared a memorandum on the different matters contained in his memorandum and, on August 15th when he came back, I handed it to him. I kept copies of his memorandum and mine.

On account of the Luz’s illness, we have been recalling his many acts. Zulueta recounts that one afternoon, Luz called Alunan and himself, and with Luz’s forefinger on his lips to indicate that they should make no noise, he led them to a corner. Luz said he had very important news and Alunan and Zulueta became very anxious to know what they were. Suddenly he stood up and sang “Pregunta a Las Estrellas.”

Shortly after his arrival, he asked that we hold a special prayer for the soul of his mother as it was the anniversary of her death. He prepared a prayer which he said with full devotion. But his prayer was that Madrigal give his millions to our cause.

The next day he called us all to a meeting. He said he had very important news to transmit. Since we did not know him very well then, we were very eager to hear what he had to say. After a long preliminary which kept us more anxious, he broke down and began to cry. He announced that he was suffering from malaria and he hoped that we would not mind if he stayed with us. In chorus, we told him that we had no objection.


November 17, 1944

Sirens sounded twice today, first at about 11 a.m. indicating “stand-by” and then at 12 noon giving “All-Clear” signal. Saw no planes except three Jap fighters rhat flew very low over a house at Taft Avenue.

People are disappointed. After heavy raids on Tuesday and Wednesday, they expected to hear of landings in Luzon. Apparently those were merely neutralization raids while Kreuger’s Army pushed on towards Ormoc.

Question now is “Whether U.S. will be here before Christmas?” or “Will it be in 1945 yet?” Many however still stick to belief that MacArthur will return to Luzon before end of November.

Meanwhile Jap troops keep pouring into City. Saw many Jap soldiers marching in Taft Avenue. They were in full pack and they looked very tired. I don’t know where they came from but they looked like old, weary veterans of several wars.

I understand that the rice supply of the Jap Army quartermaster is running precariously low. Reason behind amalgamation of GUNKANRI BEI KOKU (Jap rice control office) with BIBA (P.I. rice agency) into new unified organization called RICOA (rice and corn administration) is due to inability of Japs to ship rice procured from Cagayan and Isabela from Aparri port to Manila harbor.

Despite previous arrangement made by Puppet Laurel granting Japs exclusive control and disposal of all rice crops in Nueva Vizcaya-Cagayan-Isabela region providing Japs leave Central Luzon to BIBA, the Japs now find it necessary to scrap this previous agreement and to draw from Central Luzon. Jap authorities have revealed that overland transportation from Cagayan to Manila practically impossible due to impassable roads, swift Cagayan river and shortage of trucks, spare parts and fuel. Overseas route via China Sea and Pacific Ocean now very hazardous, in fact virtually impossible, due to intensified U.S. submarine and aerial attacks on Jap shipping.

Meanwhile Tribune has announced that creation of RICOA due to desire of Japs to help Republic procure rice from Central Luzon because Japs cannot stay indifferent to the plight of thousands of Manilans suffering hunger. Nobody however swallows this baloney except the Japs themselves and Filipino collaborators like Laurel and Sanvictores and Sabido etcetera.

Compulsory labor is now enforced. Saw hundreds of young men walking in streets accompanied by Jap sentries with fixed bayonets. I am very careful these days when I go downtown because I may also be taken any moment. This labor conscription gives the lie to Laurel’s main boast that he won’t permit any conscription.

Heard Romulo over Voice of Freedom. I shed tears. He addressed the Japanese soldier, told him that the Filipinos will drive him out of this islands and will never surrender to him.

I can hear explosions right now, probably dynamite. Japs are building caves to store their supplies.

Got to stop now. Somebody is calling for me in the phone. I’m rather surprised though because our phone has been out of order for three weeks.

These days most telephones are out of order, frigidaires cannot be repaired, electric stoves cannot be fixed, there is very little gas and the water is not safe for drinking unless boiled. Roads are full of holes, big enough for carabaos to wallow and there are no more taxis or street cars or garages for people. If you want to get anywhere, you’ve got to walk. Cars and street cars are exclusively for Japs. If you’ve got a bicycle, you are lucky, but you always run the risk that a Jap may commandeer it from you.

This is co-prosperity, Jap style, 1944. Collaboration, cooperation, co-prosperity is a one-way traffic affair as far as Japs are concerned. I wonder what Webster dictionary thinks about it. I think I’ll send the Jap premier a brand new book.


March 5, 1936

Reporters who accompanied Quezon on his northern trip said that at the dedication of the Bayambong bridge and in three other speeches, Quezon stated that the opening up of Nueva Viscaya and Isabella was due to my hunting trips there of twenty years ago.

San Juan Lateran “commencement” of the military class and presentation of a gold sword to Colonel Vicente Lim, Professor of Military Science there. Marquee on the lawn in front of the old walls of city. Father Rector spoke in English–complimenting the cadets; he said that most of the leading soldiers in the revolt against Spain had been trained in this Corps “and though I am a Spaniard, I recognize the right of a people to fight for their independence.” This address was made just forty years after the day when the prisons behind those walls had been crammed with Filipinos supposed by the priest-ridden Spanish Government to sympathize with the Insurrectos! I sat next to the Father Rector of Santo Tomas University whom I knew of old. He said he approved of military training in the schools, and disapproved of college athletics because of their semi-professionalism. Bocobo, the President of the University of the Philippines, delivered the address in favour of military training; he commended it as a cure for Filipino slackness, tardiness, and lack of discipline in business as well as in social life. I said to Father Rector (who is Spanish), “He is telling the Filipinos some home truths which neither you nor I could express.” The Father Rector approves greatly of Quezon’s Government and he added: “he understands his own people.”

Saw Unson who, on my enquiry, told me Quezon had said nothing to him as Chairman of the Government Survey Board as to my working with him. I told him Quezon had contemplated turning the whole thing over to me, and when he created the Board instead, he had wanted me to work with them.


December 31, 1900

In order to take leave of the nineteenth century and the old year and to welcome the new year and the new century, the honorable president invited to his house all the leading men of Palanan and the officers of his escort, as well as the charming lady dancers of this town.

The entertainment commenced at 7 o’clock in the evening with dances and rigadoons. About 11.30 o’clock all sat down at the table to eat supper, and when it struck 12 the band played the national air. After supper the honorable president and all the officers proposed toasts. When all this was over, dances and rigadoons commenced again and lasted till 4 o’clock in the morning, when the guests dispersed.