September 20, 1972

 

 

(1)

1040 PM

Sept, 20, 1972

Malacañan Palace

Manila

The two Americans paid to assassinate me were supposed to do the job this morning but when they tried out the guns (even the .22 caliber) they were too loud.  This was explained by our penetration man, Talastas.

They have prepared a Comby wagon, put a hole in the back and have tried to park it between the press and the Maharlika or the boathouse and they can swipe at me at the Pangarap boat landing on the golf course.

I declassified two documents which contain reports of Sen. Aquino to Sec. Ponce Enrile and Gen. Ramos July 27th and 29th, this year which show his propensity as a blubber mouth.

I attach copies of the documents in Envelope No. XXXV-A.  The original reports were in my diary.  Then I wrote Sen A. Roxas to inform him that what I wanted to do in the conference was

 

(2)

 

Sept 20th (Con’t)

v

Malacañan Palace

Manila

not to blame anyone but to break up a “link-up” of the Liberal Party to the Communist Party if any.  I attach this letter in XXXV-A.

I sent a  copy of the letter to all senators because of the expected privelege speech of Aquino copy of which I attach in XXXV-A.

Sen. Perez put my letter on the record.

Sec. Ponce Enrile dared Aquino who had denied his report, to a confrontation which the latter refused.

Sen. Maceda filed a motion to investigate Aquino but he withdrew it when Roxas objected.

I also sent copies of the affidavits of the other witnesses against Aquino to seven senators — Perez, Maceda, Almendras, Pelaez, Tevez, Tolentino, copy in XXXV-A.

 

(3)

 

Sept. 20th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

This afternoon General Staff with the SND and the Chiefs of the major services came to see us to submit the Assessment of Public Order wherein they recommend the use of  “other forms of countering subversion/insurgency should be considered.” This means they recommend the use of Emergency Powers including Martial Law, formally.  Envelope No. XXXV-B.

Then we gave an interview where we kept silent on Emergency Powers but spoke of listing Arrival (?) syndicates in the Order of Battle of the communist armed elements, the Self-Reliant Defense Posture as it relates to internal threats, expenditures, additional armaments and personnel etc.

I was surprised to hear Sec. Melchor say he was now in favor of Martial Law although he was against it a year and a half ago.  And all Sec. Abad Santos said was, Let us not talk about it publicly.

I asked Sec. Melchor to submit a study and recommendation in writing and to prepare to use his American contacts to see the U.S. does not oppose us.

 

(4)

 

Sept 20th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

 

Johnny and I again reviewed the proclamation which we again amended.  He wrote out the orders on carrying firearms and on control of shipping.

While we were working on the list of target personalities, Amb. Byroade called to see me on the conversation I had with Robert Wales, President of the American community.  I see him at 11.00 AM.

I could not sign the proclamation and orders because they have to be re-typed.

Imelda is at the house of Imelda Cojuangco celebrating the latter’s birthday.


Thursday, September 7, 1972

This morning, I had a full hour’s chat with President Macapagal. Majority Floor Leader Edmundo (Munding) Cea and Vice Pres. Abraham (Abe) Sarmiento were with us part of the time. I was telling Macapagal that he had delivered a mesmerizing speech yesterday in favor of the ban-dynasty resolution. In fact I heard it said, by some delegates, that that was his finest hour.

I also suggested to Macapagal that there are perhaps two options for us. The first is to just simply freeze the ball and let the Convention work as slowly as possible so that the plebiscite on the new Constitution may only be done after the expiration of Marcos’ term in 1973. This would really, in effect, ban the incumbent. In fact, Convention secretary, Jose (Pepe) Abueva, has also suggested the same thing.

Another possibility, I said, was to declare a recess until January 1974.

We then talked about the transition government resolution filed by Oscar (Oka) Leviste and Antonio (Tony) Velasco. To my great surprise, Macapagal said what was almost unbelievable to me up to then—that this resolution might pass.

For some delegates, the point is, the ban-dynasty provision has already failed anyway; Marcos would surely win. Therefore, we might just as well postpone the election and hold over the positions of elective officials. The bonus is that we, the delegates, would be there in the first parliament. This is the substance and spirit of the Tony-Oka transition government resolution.

Incredible, I said. How can such a self-serving resolution pass? I remember now that Antonio (Tony) Tupaz had told me that definitely this would pass. I had dismissed the idea quickly then. But last night, Pepe Abueva was telling me that this just might pass really, for all we know. Macapagal sadly confirmed this: “Yes, that might even pass.”

This now seems to be a serious matter—where before, only Oka Leviste and Tony Velasco believed in it. But, of course, the come-on is irresistible. Who wouldn’t want to be in the first parliament—without even having to fight it out in an election contest?

 Macapagal did not know that Gary Teves and Adolfo (Adolf) Azcuña all along have been voting independently. Macapagal was quite surprised by what I said about Gary, because Gary’s uncle, Senator Teves, and his father, Congressman Teves, were allies of Marcos. I said, “Oh, yes, all along he has been with us.”

I like the kid. He is sincere and competent; I feel that young people like him should be encouraged and supported. He has voted independently of the way Congressman Teves and Senator Teves have been voting in Congress.

The other politician’s son who has surprisingly been consistently voting with us is Adolf Azcuña. The voting record of Adolf has really been progressive and independent. In fact, although he is an assistant attorney at the Bengzon law office, his record is poles apart from that of Peps Bengzon. In Adolf’s own words, some six months ago, his vote was 85 percent of the time different from that of Peps. Now, again, on the ban-Marcos resolution, he voted with us. He did not have second thoughts about his true colors.

Of course his local political rival, Ernesto (Erning) Amatong, is not very certain of Adolf s persuasions. Is he really independent of his father’s influence, this son of Congressman Azcuña? Nevertheless, Erning is a fair man and he has acknowledged to me that he is impressed by Adolf. He agrees with me that Adolf has been showing himself to be a sincere and independent-minded and conscientious young man.

Erning Amatong, as expected, voted with us. He is an old reliable, really. So did Vincenzo Sagun.

At noon, I went to the meeting of the Independent-Progressive bloc at the home of Pepe Calderon to discuss our options.


July 10, 1972 Monday

 

12:00 PM

PAGE 2184

July 10, 1972

Monday

 

Malacañan Palace

Manila

The reaction time of the ABG to the situation in Diguyo Bay was too long. Troops and communication were not too ready nor was air transport. The Air Force and Navy have bombarded the installations of the NPA now estimated to number 200 or more, preparatory to the grand troops assault. I attach reports. Was interviewed by Mr. Y. I attach papers of the Japan Economic At 4:00 PM attended the opening of the Educational Book Exhibition on board the “Logos” a 278 ft, 2,300 ton ship based in Singapore, now docked at Pier 15. I donated some books including mine. And in my remarks of welcome I said: You have come on a noble mission that strikes a chord of response in our hearts. For you symbolize the privacy of the spirits over matter, the mind over body and thought over environment. This is typically Asian which is still beset by man’s ancient enemies – impoverishment, illness and disease and ignorance.

 

PAGE 2185

July 10th (Con’t)

 

Malacañan Palace

Manila

 

“Where the politicians, the would-be statesmen, the orators and lathers fail, may you succeed – to unify all man into one family of peace and progress.” “While there are men and women like you, there is hope for the human race.” Nick Jimenez and his brother Ramon came to give me a copy of the statement to be read by Delegate Eduardo Quintero tomorrow at the Concon. I attach copy. Sen. Lorenzo Teves and Cong. Jose Alberto came to ask me to agree to the compromise as the budget – cut out the power of transfer except on calamities and contingencies, cut the AFP funds by about P100 M the rural cooperative to P100 M P50 M to be supported from savings, the Intelligence find to be intact, so with savings to include the AFP and rural cooperatives. I am asking them to hold decision until the 20th if this month.