Friday, July 30, 1943

The barracks seem ready and the contractors men are conspicuous by their absence. The bus returned and two girls with it as secretaries—a silly idea with plenty of men available to do the work. Bill made jam and we tried it on toast with coffee in company with Crane and Cromwell tonight. There’s still no news when you’re coming—hope to hear more tomorrow.


Wednesday, July 28, 1943

Things are moving faster, a petition’s been filed by our committee with the Commandant to be forwarded the General in Command. They were strong and I’ll try to keep copies of them. Last night a group circulated a resolution for signature by internees, supporting the petition and further requesting that the Chairman and Vice Chairman be permitted to present our case to the Co. Gen. personally soon as possible. Everyone here signed it with the exception of Bradney who doesn’t approve anything…


Monday, July 26, 1943

Cigarettes 35 cents per pack today. I’ll have to stop smoking again—With more success I hope. The grounds around the barracks are being cleared by the contractor, I guess they’re nearly finished. The look dark and foreboding, Darling, I love you.


Saturday, July 24, 1943

…The lumber raiders, headed by young Francisco, overdid it this morning and the Guard Captain announced today that if caught they would be dealt with according to military law. The F’s are up to their customary practices and among other things allegedly running three gambling games. The repatriation rumor is in part a fact, 21 of us here have been approached on the subject. I hope you’re not on the list, but I would be surprised if you are. No—you’ll be up here with me—one of these days.


Friday, July 23, 1943

I didn’t get to bed early enough last night. Monitors meeting that indicated our peculiar position here and indicated that you probably will not be coming up except under violent protest until the middle of next month at the least. The lightless, waterless, toiletless barracks are being desperately protested and it may be that the visit of Lt. Gen. Kuroda was significant. At any rate his reaction is being awaited. We’re getting along. The noon meal yesterday had bad meat in it. My leg is nearly healed but I’m still running to the bath room 4-5 times a day… The uncertainty of things has bad effects—morale and things are sort of drifting. They used the month’s allotment of gas for the truck hauling shrubs and trees for beautification planting so had to keep the bus here to haul 5 sacks of rice from the RR Sta. That sort of thing burns everybody up. Manning is quite discouraged, can’t get anyone to do anything and no one likes what he does—he has charge of labor pool personnel I’d like to help him out but I’m going to pursue my own program.


Friday, July 16, 1943

The picture of our super executive chief of the const. dept. personally shoveling a hole in front of the Gym for the planting of a shrub while the septic tank out in back was overflowing aroused a great deal of comment today—slightly exaggerated maybe, but substantially the truth. Hamburgers tonight for the first time, tasted good too.


Thursday, July 15, 1943

Cal went to Manila today. Commandant offered information yesterday that new barracks would be turned over to us without electricity, running water and other than Chick Sale affairs for toilets, to say nothing of a lack of concrete floors and verandas. Cal is going to protest and try and delay your arrival here. I hope you come up anyway and that they move men into the barracks and leave the buildings to the women. I want to see you. Hope you send some peanut butter some time.


Wednesday, July 14, 1943

I am having swell folding chair made, seat and back of rattan of course. In fact I think I’ll make it two if they’ll take my little one in the trade for pay of one… We sent packages and notes today; I sent ₱20 and I hope you buy a few things for yourself.