April 16, 1942

Mauricio Cruz told my brother that a certain captain stated that he saw my son Philip 3rd embarking on a boat for Corregidor. On the other, Jorge de Leon, Jr. called me up and stated that together with his uncle, Luis Dizon, PASUDECO’s secretary, he was able to talk to my son, in San Fernando, Pampanga. He said Philip had fever and malaria.

Dr. Antonio Vasquez offered to accompany me to San Fernando. He gave me some quinine which is at present worth its weight in gold. But he said it is better not to give any medicine if it is malaria, because this causes a tendency to hide the disease due to the formation of spores. He stated that I should not worry because the Malarial cases from Bataan are of the mild type because it is still the dry season. Malaria becomes fulminant during the rainy season, he revealed.

Mr. Fukada said he was not able to secure a pass for me to San Fernando. He stated that the High Command does not want to give privileges to anybody. “If they give to one they must give to all,” he said.

Chairman Jorge B. Vargas offered me his car. He asked one of his Japanese aides if he would be willing to accompany me even if I did not have a permit. The Japanese was willing to take the chance.

Later in the evening, Mr. Fukada called me up in the house. He said: “Better postpone your trip, doctor. The prisoners now being sent to different concentration camps. Plenty confusion there. No names. Send to Capaz and everywhere. Better wait.”

Still later in the evening, Gregorio Nieva phoned: “My son Tony was seen entering Bilibid at about 6 p.m. Maybe your son is with him.”

Mary left for Cabanatuan. There is also a concentration camp there. She said she would see what she can do from there.

This is like looking for a needle in a haystack.


May 13, 1936

Intense heat these days–97°-100° indoors. In the afternoon Trinidad (who is the manager of the Pampanga Sugar Co.), of whom I asked why no sugar shares were for sale, said this was the time to sell out, not buy, but shareholders expected to get all their capital back in three or four years, and a profit also. However, present prices offered for the shares were too low to tempt holders into the market.

In shopping in Manila, especially on the Escolta, American “salesmanship” is used to the Nth power, with the result that some of us are offended (as I was in Heacock’s today) and leave without a purchase.

Five prisoners escape from Montinlupa–one is recaptured; the “trusty” system seems to have its limits.

At 3:30 p.m. went down to the Coolidge to say good-bye to High Commissioner Murphy and Quezon. The former looked preoccupied and tired. I said to Quezon: “you will see Doria in Peking.” He answered: “Oh! I’m only going to Hong Kong–to be back Tuesday (18th)–wish you were coming with me.” I told him I was staying here under Dr. Sison’s care. The next day, Vargas received a telegram stating that Quezon was not returning until the 28th so probably he will get as far as Shanghai. On the steamer, I chaffed Osmeña about being my “boss” now, and he said “I’m not to be acting President”–Quezon apparently acts on precedents of recent American presidents.

Talk with A. D. Williams. He said Quezon was angry with Bewley, whom he had previously always supported, because the teachers in the Bureau of Education had opposed giving up Teacher’s Camp in Baguio for the National Army as Quezon and MacArthur desire. This worried Bewley greatly, so he apparently saw Quezon and disowned all opposition.