October 26, 1972

 

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1.

10:00 PM

Oct. 26, 1972

Thursday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

216,000 firearms have been surrendered as of this mornings report. The 3rd PC Zone turned in about 103,000.

There was a robbery last night of the Philippine Veteran’s Bank, Quezon City Branch. The robbers killed the two guards, placed them inside the vault, closed it and took ₱300,000 and $100,000. The Metrocom and CIB are still working at it. Looks like an inside job because the vault was opened by the robbers.

No further development in Marawi City other than that the APC in Balabayan could not be moved so the Army is sending an APC from Gen. Zagala here in Fort Bonifacio.

Met Glendon Rowell and Jack Small of the Reader’s Digest which is thinking of putting in an article about martial law.

 

2.

Oct. 26th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Messrs. Greenberg and Stempel were accompanied by Cesar Zalamea, their local president. They are worried about their investments in real estate. I explained that the Constitutional Convention had the final say.

Hed lunch with AID Deputy Director McDonald and his Asst Mr. Shoop. They are apparently in favor of a commodity loan of $20 million for Land Reform.

US AID will give a total of $150 m. for aid: $70 for the old programs; $30 m for food and during the flood; and $50 for the rehabilitation program.

Before lunch we worked on prices. We will determine what commodities should be socially supported. Then we determine how much is needed and whether we can afford it.

It is my intention to further bring down prices by 30-50%.


October 25, 1972

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1.

9:40 PM

Oct. 25, 1972

Wednesday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

145,000 guns have been surrendered as of this noon. 70,000 of this came from III PC Zone, 30,000 of which is good foreign make.

We lost three men in Lanao del Sur when an armored car was ambushed 20 kms northeast of Marawi. The men are now cleaning up the areas outside that city.

So we need the APC’s but the one at Balabayan cannot be moved because of mechanical trouble and there does not seem to be any trailers or prime movers.

Our maintenance must be improved.

Have ordered the arrest of the more highranking Customs men headed by Dizon because the extortion syndicate is still active. Mel Varono who claims relationship to me is still included among those to be apprehended tonight.

Cebu will be reorganized and the notorious smugglers detained.

 

2.

Oct. 25th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

I have appointed Commodore Romulo Espaldon as my representative and as Acting Supervisor of the Bureau of Customs in accordance with the policy that officers in the civil government that are critical and affect the security of the state be placed under direct supervision.


October 22, 1972

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1.

12:25 PM

Oct. 22, 1972

Sunday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Ambassador Urabe was able to move out of the PSU where they were practically kept hostages by the Muslim rebels. He arrived in Manila at 4:10 PM and saw me at 5:00 PM to explain what he saw and what had happened.

I just talked to Gen. Ramos, Gen. Encarnacion and Lancaf Task Force Commander Col. Zafra by SSB. Attached list of request.

It turns out the rebels are followers of the former Chief of Police dismissed by Mayor Omar Dianalan, Zakar and a former BIR man also dismissed for being notoriously undesirable. They both have 200 men each.

They sought to isolate Marawi City by taking Pantar Bridge over the Agos River and burning the wooden portion. Then they took the MSU radio and sought to rally the people to their side. But the people did not respond because the mayors who had just seen me

2.

Oct. 22nd (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

in Malacañan dissuaded the people from joining the rebels. And the swift retaliatory action by our reinforcements employing mortars and the recoil-less rifles — the 106 and 3.5 mm (the latter were first employed by the marine company in Pantar bridge when the rebels in full force blocked the road with two panel wagons. The marines suffered five WIA in that encounter.

The rebels attacked Marawi and the surrounded PC Prov. Hq. at 4:00 AM and 8:00 AM this morning. They were repulsed again.

As of tonight there is still sporadic firing and another attack is expected. We are sending two more companies tomorrow. And this includes one company from the PSC –the Special Forces company of 100 officers and men.

Our troops have actually suffered three KIA, 2 MIA and 7 WIA while the enemy has suffered 50-60 KIA, the bodies

3.

Oct. 22nd (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

still lying in front of the PC Hq.

I have ordered all the rebels who participated in the attack to be accounted for dead or alive.

Any sign of weakness will be exploited by the rebels and their protectors.

The Japanese Recovery Team for the Japanese straggler in Lubang Island arrived this afternoon at 2:30 PM with 42 Japanese correspondents. They were ferried by C-47 and will be supported by heli tomorrow when the brother of the survivor Lt. Ouada will try to locate him and drop leaflets as well as appeal to him by loudspeaker.

The Japanese correspondents will probably be interested in the escape of the Japanese ambassador from Marawi now.

 


October 21, 1972

 

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1.

12:35 PM

Oct. 21, 1972

Saturday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Just arrived from the informal dinner given by Pres. and Mrs. Watanabe of the Asian Development Bank. Only Sec. & Mrs. Alex Melchor, Sec and Mrs. Cesar Virata and ADB Vice Pres. Krisna Moortli were present. Pres. Watanabe is retiring Dec. 25th.

It was a pleasant dinner with much story telling punctuated by laughter.

Proclaimed the emancipation of the tenant-farmer this morning. I attach a copy of my proclamation or decree. This should cause the actual start of the Reformation.

And gave a 1st month report of martial law.

Then met the labor leaders, the rural bankers, the governor, Liberal leaders and mayors of Masbate.

A Japanese straggler was killed and his companion wounded in Lubang yesterday by

2.

Oct. 21st (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

the PC patrol they ambushed.

Camp Keithley in Marawi City is under attack by a band of outlaws who have taken over the MSU radio, raised the red flag and surrounded the PC Prov. Hq. of Maj. Marolomsar, Prov. Commander. Eight of our men have been killed (six outright at Pantar Bridge that leads to the city from Iligan) and one wounded while nine have been killed on the enemy side and one captured who is being interrogated.

Reinforcements being rushed to the besieged forces.

The enemy may number anywhere from 100 to 400. But PC Prov. Hq. under attack holding out.

Other Mindanao units alerted in case this attack is a signal of an uprising in all of Mindanao and Sulu.

3.

Oct. 21st (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

I believe the attackers may be a combination of student radicals (KM and SDK) supported by outlaws. The red flag may show they are communist infiltrated or controlled.

And again this may be a diversion from the Luzon front where the communists are hard pressed.

Or a demonstration that the leaders I talked to and placated like the Alontos and Pendatun do not run things anymore.

Or again this may be a Pendatun and Alonto play to gain a stronger bargaining position.

But we are not going to bargain. We will hit them hard.


August 19, 1970

MALACAÑAN PALACE
Manila

August 19, 1970
Wednesday

11:00 PM

Imelda went alone to Quezon Province on Quezon’s birthday celebration and as usual was mobbed by the people in the five towns she visited with Sen. Pres. Pro Tempore Jose Roy.

Speculations will continue snowballing about her running for President after me.

Assured the German financiers and suppliers of Abaca Pulp and Paper Industry that the government is interested in the project and will push it through. This was necessary as the funds have lain idle for some time.

Scolded Gen. Garcia for announcing that he had ordered 3,000 armalites for the PC. In the first place this is not true as only two thousand five hundred have been bought and it was not his idea. It violates our security measures.

Am pushing the setting up of occupancy installations in Flat Island and Naushan Island because Freedom Island or Itu Ato has been occupied by the Nationalist government. I ordered the Air Force to air-photo the islands and they have submitted their report. The occupancy of Flat Island and Naushan Island will protect our shores – Palawan and our present grant of oil drilling rights in the Palawan shelf to the Seafront.


February 9, 1970, Monday

09Feb1970_1 09Feb1970_2 09Feb1970_3

PAGE 73

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang

February 9, 1970

Monday

9:40 PM

I write this as I wait for a visitor who will inform us of all the conspiracy going on behind the Liberal Party. Osmeña has just delivered a privilege speech in the Senate denying his connection with the demonstrators and the riots and rehashing his charges about the elections.

Villalon testifying before the Senate-House Joint Committee should blast this claim to pieces. Col. Jimmy Barbers has asked for an opportunity to present him next Wednesday at 9:00 AM.

Went out of the Palace (for the first time since Jan. 30, 1970) to attend the 31st Anniversary of the Phil. Navy set at 9:00 AM. Stayed until 11:00 AM. Commissioned the new 25-know 87 ft. patrol craft made in Singapore. Our Navy will duplicate it. We have a 100 ft. ferro-cement fishing boat in the making.

Was gratified to see the people waving at me and clapping their hands. The public sympathy has returned to us since the attack on the Palace on Jan. 30th.

Apparently the crisis is over – unless the Feb. 12th rallies turn into violent riots, God forbid.

The whole family was in Scout uniform at the 5:00 o’clock investiture of Imelda and the opening ceremonies of the preparation for the 50th Anniversary of Scouting in 1973.

Conferred with the two Cardinals, Santos and Rosales, on the Jesuits and bishops propagating radical ideas – like Father Ortiz, Murphy (Tom) and Blanco as well as the seven bishops who sent the open letter.

PAGE 74

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang

Now even the student leaders are divided. They seem to be in a state of confusion. Tonight 25 students from the UP have seen the First Lady. Uncivil, arrogant but uninformed, naïve and confused.

I see the KM and Labor leaders with Blas Ople tomorrow at 5:00 PM.

But the NUSP is following the script of making demands which I am supposed to grant – to strengthen their hand. And they are supposed to picket Malacañang tomorrow.

Even if the demonstrations should turn violent because the latest intelligence is that Commander Dante is supposed to be collecting hand guns in Concepcion and supposedly in the province of Tarlac, for use in Manila, it would still be favorable to us for the people are against violence – specially if it is against Malacañang Palace.

We must recast the plans for a total solution of the communist problem. We must prepare for a long, tedious legal fight with the military stepping up the drive in Central Luzon and harassing raids in Novaliches, Caloocan and Parañaque where the HMBs and the Mao’s hold in when they escape from the PC raids in Central Luzon.

PAGE 75

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang

Gov. Licaros sent a message through Bobby Benedicto who is agreed to going out on leave from the Presidency of the PNB, that his mission is a complete success.

We will get the third tranche of $27.5 million $40 m from out gold $40 from the Federal Reserve Bank and $120 million from the consortium of banks plus a five year extension of our debts. If we can get $100 m from Japan, we will have all we need.

Now all I am asking for is to be allowed to start working.


January 24, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 51

PAGE 49

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang Palace

January 24, 1970

1:00 PM

I have just directed the retirement of Gen. Raval and all the extended generals effective Feb 1st and April 1st. I will retain Gen. Yan as Chief of Staff only because there is no one who is qualified to take his place. I will put Gen. Eddie Garcia presently CG of the Tabak Division as PC chief.

I do sympathize with Gen. Raval who claims  he had nothing to do with the abuses of the Special Forces but there is discontent in the rank and file of the Armed Forces and Gen. Raval is one of the reasons. Another is the feeling of the lower ranking officers that they have no hope of advancement. And with the efforts of the Liberals to intrigue the military into a coup d’etat, it becomes necessary to remove all causes of grievance.

The truth of the matter is the retiring officers are better than those who will succeed them. I hope to place some of them in civilian positions.

I cannot choose a replacement of Sec. Mata. I am trying to get a civilian and non-military man. But I guess I will ultimately push Gen. Yan up to Secretary of National Defense while I ultimately push Ileto up to Chief of Staff.


February 22, 1969 — Saturday

General Raval, Chief of Constabulary visited me and asked me advice on how to improve the morale, the behavior and the integrity of the members of the force. I told him that it is best to talk to the young officers and awaken in their minds the importance of honesty, integrity and loyalty. Afterwards gradually concentrate on the older officers. He requested me to speak to the officers next Saturday March 1, at 9 a.m. at Camp Crame.


May 17, 1945 Thursday

It is rumored that Gen. MacArthur is coming on the 20th. We do not know the purpose of the visit. But we shall see.

I had considered Minister Jose Paez as one of those absolutely content with his lot. Being a quiet man, he has never been heard to complain. In my conversation with him today, I found that he is resentful of the treatment accorded to us. He believes that there was deceit in that we were not told at all that we were going to be arrested, detained and deported. The Americans ignored the idiosyncracies and customs of the Filipinos; we were not given any opportunity to see our families or, as in his case, to see whether they had left Tubao for Manila, and if so, where they lived in Manila. The Americans do not know the attachment of a Filipino to his family.

Chief Justice Yulo has been sick during the last few days. He has not been going to the mess hall. We all believe that the only thing the matter with him is he worries too much and broods constantly. He just cannot understand why he should be detained and deported after his attitude of defiance against the Japanese which almost cost him is life and after he had served the cause of America.

I do not mean to make this a “Who’s Who”. But there are other personalities, characters and persons in this community of which special mention must be made.

The first is Don Vicente Madrigal, reputed to be the richest man in the Philippines. He was a schoolmate and one of the most intimate friends of Quezon and Osmeña. In fact, they used to confide in him their innermost secrets. From a humble beginning as a coal dealer, he became the coal king of the Philippines, controlling the greater portion of the coal business. He later expanded his business to almost every branch of business endeavor. He became a shipping magnate, a large scale merchant, a manufacturer (cement and sugar), an agriculturist, etc. His name was connected with almost all the big businesses in Manila. In recognition of his rise in the business world, he was elected president of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce many times. He became a real tycoon. Pres. Quezon recognized his ability, and although he knew that Don Vicente loathed politics, he compelled him to be a candidate for Senator in 1941. He was elected, but the war came and he was not able to occupy his seat. During the Japanese regime, he was a member of the Organization Committee of the First Council of State, the preparatory committee for Philippine Independence which drafted the Constitution of the Philippine Republic and the Planning Board. Probably more will be heard of Don Vicente when the rehabilitation period comes. It will be a crime not to make full use of his experience and unquestioned ability.

There is another person of an entirely different type. He is a notorious character. He is Francisco C. de la Rama, alias Francisco Concepcion, alias Francisco Angeles, and now F.C. or Frank. His admirers call him “Don Paco”. I tried to avoid mentioning him as I do not care to talk about the bad side of anybody, especially those who, like De la Rama, are with us and who do their best to comfort and help us. But today he himself told us his whole story. He misappropriated funds belonging to Bachrach & Co. while he worked for them as a sales agent in the Bicol region. His picture was at one time posted throughout the Philippines for having been accused of “estafa” by the Gonzaga’s of Negros. A prize of ₱500 was offered for his arrest. He fled to Singapore and to other foreign countries. But he became homesick and returned to the Philippines. He was in hiding in Jolo, in La Union, and in the Ilocos region. Unfortunately for him, he was discovered and arrested everywhere he went. However, he always managed to keep out of jail by bribing the arresting officers. At one time, the very Constabulary officer who arrested him helped him escape to Baguio. It was then the time of the mining boom. He bought over 40 mining claims for ₱200 each and sold them at ₱5,000 each. With this large sum, he was able to settle all claims against him. He then assumed the surname of De la Rama pretending to be the nephew of the big millionaire, Don Esteban de la Rama of Iloilo. Because of his name, he was made Director of a mining company. He was later accused of “estafa” with more than 50 counts against him by the stockholders of the company. He was convicted only on one count and sentenced to one year and eight months, but as he was a recidivist he was given an additional sentence of 10 years. He probably was pardoned because when the Japanese came, he became the foremost “buy and sell” man. He made millions easily in his business with the Japanese Army and Navy. He also became one of the biggest men in the real estate business. His name was heard everywhere. He overshadowed famous names like Madrigal, De Leon and Fernandez. He especially became famous because of his published donations to charity of thousands of pesos. He gave money to the Government for scientific research. He donated a big sum to the “Timbolan” to feed the needy. He made large donations not only to institutions, but also to individuals. It is said that upon his arrest, a big demonstration of laborers was staged demanding his release. He is now with us. He has been very helpful to everybody. He seems to have been able, by his usual means, to elicit the good side of the guards and, for this reason, we are now able to receive things from the outside and to send out anything. He is still young and if hereafter he becomes careful with his conduct, he may still be a real power in the business world, being an intelligent and able man.

There is a real personality in our group. I am referring to Major Gen. Guillermo B. Francisco. This is the highest rank that has ever been attained by a Filipino in the U.S. Army. In 1908, he was one of the first graduates of the Philippine Military Academy in Baguio. He rose from the ranks. In each province where he was assigned, he left a record for efficiency and wise and impartial enforcement of the law. He could not be bribed nor influenced by politicians. For this reason, politicians in some provinces molested him by presenting unfounded and absurd complaints. He was Chief of Staff of the Constabulary for many years. In 1936, he received his just and well merited promotion to Brigadier General. From 1938 to 1941, he was Chief of the Philippine Constabulary. Just at the beginning of the war in Dec. 1941, he was promoted to Major General and continued as Chief of Constabulary, which afterwards became a division of the Philippine Army. Upon the induction of the Philippine Army into the U.S. Army, he naturally became a Major General in the U.S. Army. As such he also had to retreat to Bataan where he was placed in charge of a very important and strategic sector. He acquitted himself very creditably. While there he was ordered by Gen. Wainright to go to different places for pacification. Believing that it was for the interest of his country to maintain peace and order, he did his best to comply with the instruction of Gen. Wainright. When Bataan surrendered, the Japanese placed him in the concentration camp at Camp O’Donnell. He was later transferred to Camp Stotsenberg where he with hundreds of other captured USAFFE officers were required to finish a rejuvenation course prescribed by the Japanese. He was returned to Camp O’Donnell where the Japanese requested him to organize the Government Employees Training Institute for the rejuvenation of public employees. And so he was released.

His stint with the training institution was cut short by his appointment as Chief of Constabulary with the rank of Major General. But this too did not last long because the Japanese did not trust him. He was relieved as Chief of Constabulary. The Japanese were right as his sympathies were with the guerrillas; as a matter of fact, he did not take action against Constabulary men who deserted and joined the guerrillas. He had even formulated plans to convert all the Constabulary to guerrillas when the proper time came.

After his relief, Pres. Laurel made him Chairman of the Advisory Board for Peace and Order. The President in doing so only wanted to save the General as he knew that the Japanese would otherwise arrest him and kill him. Together with Generals Manuel Roxas and Capinpin, he was forced to go to Baguio and there subjected to a very close surveillance. They assigned a Japanese Military Police to watch him. He was very anxious to rejoin the U.S. Army so that at the very first opportunity, he escaped from Baguio to go to the territory occupied by the Americans and present himself to them. He reached the American lines in April. Almost immediately after his arrival he was taken to Manila and there detained. He was subjected to the humiliation of photographing and fingerprinting. He was so indignant that he wept. He was later deported to Iwahig Penal Colony and is still with us. He is terribly bitter. He said he cannot understand why when the Japanese got him, he was put in a concentration camp and now that the Americans are here he is also imprisoned. Gen. Francisco is only 60 years and much more will be heard of him.

There is another person I would like to mention. He is Mr. Esteban Marcelo, an old man probably in his seventies. He is the biggest fisherman or fish dealer in Tondo. He is a friend of many big and influential public officials, especially Minister Paredes. Before the war, he frequently inivited high officials for a fish dinner at his house. During the Japanese regime, Japanese Military Police were seen quite a number of times eating dinner at his house. Such an act is now being considered as cooperation and for this reason he is now with us.

We have one military governor of a district and that is Hon. Sergio Aquino. We have also one provincial governor, Mr. Jose Urquico. Aquino is the Military Governor for the Third District and Urquico the Governor and later the Deputy Military Governor of Tarlac. They were accompanied by a young man by the name of Rafael Aquino. Why were these Military Governor and Provincial Governor singled out when there were so many military and provincial governors? And why was Rafael detained since his arrival in the Philippines from Japan, when he is only a boy without any record of service to the Japanese? Probably, there are other governors who have cooperated more actively and effectively than Aquino and Urquico. The only explanation that could be found is that Sergio Aquino is a relative and brother-in-law of Benigno Aquino, Sr.; Jose Urquico is also a brother-in-law of Benigno. Benigno Aquino was Speaker of the National Assembly and as such he was the second man in the Philippine Government officialdom. He is known to be the most rabid pro-Japanese. He had made many virulent speeches against America and the Americans. He is considered even more Japanese than Pres. Laurel himself. He went to Japan with Pres. Laurel and we can now almost surmise what would have happened to him if he had stayed in the Philippines.