November 12, 1972

024330243402435

(1)

12:40 PM

Nov. 12, 1972

Sunday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

The actuations of the Americans before the elections generated the fear that the U.S. was so tired of war that the American people were willing to buy peace at any price — even at the price of being a second class power, or second in military might to others.

But the victory of Nixon, I hope, will change all this. For peace in Asia or for that matter the world may depend on the credibility of the U.S. commitments and agreements.

The U.S. commitment in the U.S.-Phil. Defense agreement (notwithstanding the fact that action for defense against external attack will depend upon decisions in accordance with her constitutional processes, which means Congress would have to decide whether to fight or not and unless the provocation is grave Congress might decide

(2)

Nov. 12th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

to negotiate even at the expense of the Philippines) at least may now mean something.

Although I do not believe we can expect much in the way of military aid although we may be able to get some economic aid for Land Reform.

Gov. Kokoy Romualdez just talked to me by long distance telephone. He tells me that Pres. Nixon seems to be following what I am doing — asking for discipline, reorganizing the government, resignation of the officers. But that seems logical.

Today I worked on the exports problems — GATT, LTA (Long Term Agreements on Textiles) EEC-ASEAN consultations. Asked Sec. Cesar Virata and T. Quiazon to work on them and submit reports.

Imelda and I loafed around all morning.

(3)

Nov. 12th (con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

She watched the Bagong Anyo ’72 on TV in the afternoon with her friends. I went to Pangarap to play golf but it started to drizzle so I exercised indoors, had a long massage and talked to Imee by long distance to wish her a Happy Birthday. She was at the Del Mar, a beach house for the nuns at her school in Sta. Catalina. She is 17 today.

I attach the cable we sent her.


November 7-8, 1972

02426 02427

(1)

1:45 AM Nov 9th

Nov. 7, 1972

Nov 8, 1972

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Have been busy the whole day of the 7th on the amendments to the Constitution draft of the Concon.

And the first two chapters of the book (sequel to Today’s Revolution–)

Worked until 2 AM

Met no visitors on the 7th.

Nov. 8th I spent meeting the new Sec Gen of Seato Thai Minister of Economic Affairs and Ambassador to the US before his new assignment. Mr. Sunthorn Hongladarom.

And the President and Vice President of American Express James Robinson and Schumer as well as the new QSI head BGen. Temple.

Started the local support for the Reform Movement meeting the Governors and Congressmen, City Mayors & Municipal mayors of the Bicol United Bloc, Cebu, Bulacan and Benguet.

(2)

Nov. 7th & 8th

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Nixon has won by a landslide in the Tuesday elections winning in all states except Massachusetts and the District of Columbia where he lost 2-1. He even won in the state of his opponent, McGovern, South Dakota.

But the Democrats retain their majority in the Senate and the House.

Met Dr. Roy Presterman, the American governments most outstanding expert in land tenure has been here advising Sec. Estrella on the rules and regulations.

He recommends zero retention for or by the landowners –even the small ones.

And says he feels that we can get a hundred million dollars of aid from the US Congress for land reform.

Our SoSec secretarys son, Roland Villacorta, was arrested for possessing new copies of Ang Tao.

And Delegate Cesar Serapio of Bulacan was arresed in a gambling raid of the house of the House of Representatives cashier, Aldaba. I was asked to have him released. But to teach him a lesson he is being kept up to 5 AM.


Thursday, October 12, 1972

On the way to the session hall this afternoon, I met Roseller Lim.

Nakuha na si Guingona,” Ller said grimly.

In the session hall, I sat beside Dr. Pinggoy and we talked about George. He said that actually George was taken in Capiz but was released after one week. He confirmed that the military had captured a subversive book from George. It was entitled The Ecumenical Revolution.

I did not attend the Sponsorship Council meeting any more because I know what was going to be taken up, namely, the assignments in the subcouncil groupings. I have already been informed that I am chairman of the first grouping on economic and fiscal policies and that Joe Concepcion and George Viterbo are my vice-chairmen.

It seems that we might yet finish the draft of the new Constitution earlier than we had previously anticipated. There is now a sense of urgency to finish it. Besides, the opposition has now been somewhat decimated in the Convention. It looks like by the end of December or, at the latest, end of January, the new Constitution will be ready for submission to the Filipino people. The question is when the plebiscite will be held.

In the evening, we went to Hotel Intercontinental to visit Ely Chiongbian Johnston. I had previously made an arrangement with Emil Ong that we were going to meet at the lobby of the hotel. Later, Pabling Trillana, Dancing Alfelor and Amado (Ding) Tolentino decided to join us. Still later, (Aying) Yniguez came along. When I arrived at the hotel lobby, they were all there already. They were chatting with Sen. Sonny Osmeña.

Sonny was insisting that he has it from reliable authority that he is not in the list. In any case, he said, he is not in hiding, and so far, he has not been bothered.

I corrected Sonny—almost impulsively, “You are wrong, Sonny. You and I were both in the list; in fact, our names followed each other. Fortunately for us, this is just the second list.”

Sonny Osmeña’s jaw fell.

Just then, the famous Teodoro (Doroy) Valencia—the super-columnist—appeared. Without provocation, he proclaimed in his soprano voice the latest of his achievements. Newsman Amando (Doro) Doronila would be released soon—on Doroy’s guarantee. Apparently, Doro Doronila was picked up at the Intercontinental Hotel on the very day he had arrived from Mongolia.

Doroy also boasted that it was because he has guaranteed Renato (Tato) Constantino that Tato has not been taken into custody. He added that he was turning three former Politburo men to Camp Crame this morning. And he is also responsible (to some extent) for the release of Flora Lansang.

I do not know how much one can believe Doroy. But he does command some influence in the community. Indeed, he is the most influential of our political columnists. I have disagreed with many of his obnoxiously rightist views many times. At the same time, however, I must admit that occasionally, I conciously massage his colossal ego because I cannot help but praise him for doing a great job of taking care of his kingdom—Rizal Park.

Shortly before we entered the elevator, Adrian Cristobal, a special assistant of Marcos, came by. Adrian is a great writer, just like his brilliant buddy, Blas Ople. I consider him a friend. In fact, when he was appointed secretary of labor, shortly after the inauguration of the Con-Con, he had invited me to his oath-taking in Malacañang. Innocently, I did go to the Palace. Upon seeing me there, the “First Lady,” Imelda, pleasantly greeted me with the words: “Aba, nandito pala ang mga radikal.” “Mabuti naman na paminsan-minsan ay na-dadalaw kayo ng mga radikal, I retorted, also pleasantly. It was then I discovered that the conjugal dictatorship had considered me a radical, and by inference, an enemy of the Marcos regime.

I wanted to test my suspicion that Adrian is the ghost writer of the very well-written book Today’s Revolution: Democracy, officially authored by the “First Gentleman.”

I complimented him on the quality of the book he had written. “It’s really good.”

He did not hide his pleasure on hearing this. “Only I can contradict the assumptions in that book,” he beamed.

We proceeded to Ely’s suite.

Aying Yniguez, son of the powerful Congressman Yniguez who is a close friend of Marcos, was the main character in the meeting. He said that he has been with President Marcos quite a number of times, and that at one session, he had told the President:

“Sir, I am a communist but I am a pro-Marcos communist.”

He said that Marcos is a kind man—very human—and that is the reason why Aying does not really mind being derisively called a Marcos “tuta.

Aying feels that Cong. Roquito Ablan, who is in the stockade, is going to be very deeply involved and his prospects are not very bright. In the case of Sen. Ninoy Aquino, he said, he might be able to save himself because of his popularity.

Speculate, speculate, speculate. This is all we can do now.

“The President is leading a leftist revolution, with the rightists being utilized by him to support his leftist revolution. If the President fails, the offshoot would be a military takeover.”

Aying claims that he is a trade unionist (he is supposed to be a labor leader in Leyte), and very anti-military in his orientation.

He feels that the CIA was not initially behind the proclamation of martial law. It was only recently that they supported it. He was actually at Malacanang with his father, Congressman Yniguez, when the top CIA man in Manila went to see the President.

“I know that the CIA is operating in the Philippines, but you did not give me even the courtesy of letting me know about it,” President Marcos was supposed to have ungraciously told the CIA group, as he unceremoniously dismissed them: “Good day, gentlemen.”

Gerry Johnston, the American husband of Delegate Ely Chiongbian, felt differently. He thinks that all the major changes in the political and military sections of the American Embassy tend to show that the Embassy knew all along that this was going to happen. And this Ambassador Byroade, he said, is coincidentally the same man who was involved in some operations in Vietnam.

How strange it was to hear this from Gerry!

My own gut feeling is that a certain amount of American complicity has surely attended the imposition of martial law. Marcos would not have dared take such a drastic move without American approval, express or implied. From President Johnson, who had coaxed Marcos into sending a Filipino engineer batallion to Vietnam, winning for him a state visit to Washington and a glowing endorsement by Johnson as his “right arm in Asia,” to President Nixon, who had openly shown his support for Marcos by sending California Gov. Ronald Reagan to Manila when Marcos ran for reelection three years ago, there have been indications that the U.S. was prepared, from the start, to accept the imposition of martial law because it was upset over the growing demonstrations in Manila and its (wrong) perception was that the Con-Con was taking a strong anti-American stance.

American business in the Philippines was, of course, anything but unsympathetic.

Aying also confided to us that, according to Bebet Duavit, President Marcos supports wholeheartedly the transitory provision of the new Constitution (a rather great understatement!).

Aying then asked my help in getting a unanimous vote.

“But Aying, I might be out of the country when this happens,” I demurred.

Aying was not convinced. “You will still be here because this thing will be taken up next week already. You cannot possibly be out of the country then—even if you wanted to.”

Next week? This is hard to believe. The transitory provision would be taken up next week? Marcos would like a grateful nation to crown him next week? Certainly not! This should be taken up, if at all, next year!

It will be next year, I convinced myself before I went to bed.


Sept. 29, 1972, Friday

Marcos Diaries 1972_156 Marcos Diaries 1972_157

(1)

12:25 PM

Sept. 29, 1972

Friday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Sec. Vicente Abad Santos on the removal of judges: He is against the outright dismissal of civil service employees.

But I have decided to amend the civil service rules so as to add two new categories of punishment without going through a final hearing in addition to dismissal by an investigator. These are removal of those against whom charges are pending in which the evidence of guilt is strong and those that are notoriously undesirable so that it can be taken judicial notice of.

CIR judges have been removed except Judge Veloso and Paredes.

All Public Service Commissioners except Asst. Com. de Guzman also reorganized out.

I have asked Dr. Genaro de Bega to request Judges Wilfrido Angeles of Quezon City, Vivencio Ruiz of Makati, Herminio Mariano of Pasig to resign.

And I have dismissed 200 Customs men and 190 BIR men.

 

(2)

Sept. 29th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Kokoy reports that the International Press has become favorable.

Increased the allowances of the officers and men of the AFP.

Provided ₱13 million for the equipment of three new PA battalions.

Imelda is working on the commissary for the AFP.

Prices have gone down except sugar which is not available.

Tony Roxas Chua, the principal sugar trader has been arrested with others for price fixing.

Am writing Pres. Nixon on the reasons for Martial Law.


Sept. 24, 1972, Sunday

Marcos Diaries 1972_142 Marcos Diaries 1972_143 Marcos Diaries 1972_144

 

(1)

1:25 AM Sept. 25th

Sept. 24, 1972

Sunday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Diokno, Chino Roces, Max Soliven etc. have filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus before the Supreme Court.

I asked Justices Claudo Teehangkee, Antonio Barredo, Felix Macasiar and Felix Antonio to see us. They insisted that the government should submit to the Supreme Court for the Court to review the constitutionality of the proclamation of martial law, Proclamation No. 1081.

So I told them in the presence of Secs. Ponce Enrile and Vicente Abad Santos as well as Sol. Gen. Estelito Mendoza that if necessary I would formally declare the establishment of a revolutionary government so that I can formally disregard the actions of the Supreme Court.

They insisted that we retain a color of constitutionality for everything that we do.

But I feel that they are still image-building and do not understand that a new day has dawned. While they claim to be for a reformed society, they are not too motivated but are too bound by technical legalism.

I have amended both Gen. Orders Nos. 1 and 3 to assume all powers of government including legislative and judicial and clearly excluded cases involving the constitutionality of my acts from the jurisdiction

 

(2)

Sept. 24th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

of the Supreme Court.

I met the cabinet to emphasize the program to reform our society.

And I signed the decree (No. 1) to promulgate the law on the Reorganization of the Government.

Tomorrow I will sign the decrees promulgating the new Civil Service Rules, the Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Law, the Land Reform Funding and dismiss some judges, the CIR judges, Public Service Commission.

We have impressed everybody with our fairness by the arrest of Cong. Roque Ablan, Rafael Aquino and Gov. Luis Bocalan.

I have ordered profiteers to be arrested.

And the ROTC boys have cleaned up the streets of graffiti.

Only KBS and the The Daily Express are operational.

 

(3)

Sept. 24th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

I just talked to Earl Mayo, the biographer and advisor of Nixon, and his first advice is to immediately meet the press as soon as possible and explain that this is not a dictatorship.

Sec. C.P. Romulo, whom I talked to again by long distance, has done a good job of holding press interviews and issuing press releases.


Thursday, February 5, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 70 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 71 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 72

 

PAGE 68

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang

Thursday

February 5, 1970

10:20 PM

Called Ambassador Byroade to find out if they (the Americans) are supporting me in the fight against the subversives. He said they would. Whatever they have done to encourage intransigence among the Liberals, we should neutralize them before a total confrontation with the communists. To satisfy the American ego I asked for the accelerated delivery of the helicopters and some ammunition for both training and combat.

My principal worry, however, is the effect of the IMF program of a free rate of exchange. This will cause further increase in prices beyond the reach of the common man. My barber, Conrad, tells me that money is becoming scarce.

Byroade handed me his letter informing me that Pres. Nixon would like to receive me in California in mid or late August. I have accepted the invitation but I have delayed the publicity. This may cause another demonstration.

Asked Rep. Salipada Pendatun to keep peace in Cotabato and put some sense into the Liberals.

We are now preparing for the military confrontation with communism. Legal studies on whether an arrest can be made without warrant if I suspend the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus and if the arresting officer can be charged for illegal detention when the writ is restored. Then an assessment of the evidence against the target personalities.

We must prepare for a legal fight.

ATTACHMENT 

Letter of Ambassador Byroade (Page 1 of 2)

Manila, Philippines

February 3, 1970

Dear Mr. President:

You will undoubtedly recall that in your recent discussion with Vice President Agnew, the latter extended President Nixon’s invitation for you to pay a visit to the United States and suggested late 1970 or early 1971. During that conversation mention was made of the fact that many Heads of States would be going to America for the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Session of the United [Nations]. The Vice President later pointed out to you his thought that this would hardly be good timing from our point of view as with so many visitors it might be difficult to give your own visit the priority and attention that he knew President Nixon would desire. I believe, but am not certain, that Vice President Agnew suggested that a later date might be preferable.

I now have the authority to explore with you the possibility of a somewhat earlier date of mid or late August. If such timing would prove convenient to you, I am informed that President Nixon would like to receive you in California as he has found that that locale has proven ideal for comparable state occasions. I have been informed also that he would like a Pacific coast setting

 

His Excellency

Ferdinand E. Marcos

President of the Republic

of the Philippines

 

ATTACHMENT 

Letter of Ambassador Byroade (Page 2 of 2)

for the actual meeting with you as he feels this would lend emphasis to the mutual interests of our two countries in the Pacific community.

I will be most pleased, of course, to pass along your thoughts on this matter.

Sincerely,

(Sgd.) Henry A. Byroade


January 27, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 56

PAGE 54

Office of the President

of the Philippines

[Marginal note: Also met with Cong. Montano at 11:30 AM. Asked him to stop his fellow Liberals from  the crazy ideas of a coup d’etat.]

Malacañang

January 27, 1970

Tuesday

12:10 PM

Imelda left for Leyte to attend the installation of the Bishop of Palo. Have just called her up by phone patch. She says Ulot is so beautiful, the Papal Nuncio says it is more beautiful than Napoli. The moon is out. It is a three quarter fading moon.

Met with all the Chiefs of Police in the Metropolitan area, the Metrocom Chief & his staff, the PC chief and his staff and the NBI chief. Asked Col. Tamayo and Barbers to report on the rioting yesterday. I requested that the charges against the students be dropped; charges against non-students can continue; that a critique be made of the conduct of the men in uniform; that steps be taken to prevent any injuries to demonstrators in the future as there are reports of individual cases of policemen using more force than necessary. The MPD Chief explained that in the melee and the mob action, it was difficult to say what are the proper limits to the use of force to meet force. They asked for additional equipment as the policemen have to buy their own helmets and baton. About 19 policemen were injured.

As reported by Ignacio Lacsina, his NUTC men in the rally saw Roger Arienda and his men start the rioting by throwing the coffin, the stuffed crocodile and stones at my car. I have asked Col. Ver to get their affidavits.

I also met at 10:45 with Ambassador Byroade whom I quietly confronted with the story the Liberals are spreading openly that the American Embassy is supporting an attempt at a coup d’etat. He claims they only listened to the need for a coup. I told him of Patterson’s suggestion to blow up the bridges to isolate Malacañang. He seemed stunned and said he was greatly concerned and would do something about it. He said as long as he & Nixon were in position we would not be fighting Americans.

[Marginal note: I am a little relieved by his apparent willingness to cooperate with me.]


Friday, January 9, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 23 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 24

PAGE 20

Malacañang

Manila

[Marginal note: Laurel and Puyat and even Villareal say: “There is only one elector we have to campaign for and win – and he is in Malacañang.”]

Friday

January 9, 1970

Breakfast with Speaker Laurel, Speaker Pro Temp Jose Aldeguer and Maj. Floor Leader Marcelino Veloso. Told him of the drift towards the left and the fear of political leaders, businessmen and the military that we are not taking steps to prevent it but are instead encouraging it. He has agreed to remove Emmanuel Yap, head of Cepo and his next in rank Lichauco.

Then met with Former Speaker Villareal and Com on Appro Chairman Jose Alberto who agreed that we call a Nacionalista House Members Caucus Tuesday, Jan. 13th 10:00 AM at Pangarap. I intend to interview the different blocs and see who is supported by the majority.

But we must not allow the Nacionalista Party to split up on this rivalries. We must keep our old cohesion. So I also intend to call Pres. Pro Temp Jose Roy, rival of Pres Puyat for the Presidency of the Senate.

A demonstration of Batanes students – about 500 asked for arrest of those still terrorizing would-be witnesses. They claim PC helpless. So I have ordered the NBI deputy chief, Ponciano Fernando to personally go with 12 PC men who are from Batanes, to obtain evidence against, identify, arrest and prosecute all the alleged terrorists. I challenged the young men and women to fight for their rights by testifying and convincing their relatives, friends and fellow Batanenses to testify.

I am happy that my speech before the Rotary yesterday noon on Open Skies for one year and lifting of the suspension of loans for mining and new export oriented industries has been taken well.

I can feel the confidence surging back to our people. Standard remark was: “We did not know this was being done. We are glad he is President.” Soft-soap but gratifying.

PAGE 21

Malacañang

Manila

Earl Mazo, Nixon’s biographer, has just interviewed me and he says Imelda and I are so high above the newspapers and the crowd now that we should not be concerned what the papers print because if it is bad, the people will not believe it anyway.

Two questions have come up in his interview:

1. Are the U.S. military bases in the Philippines a deterrent or a magnet to bombing and/or nuclear attack. (The Recto & Laurel position is that they are mere magnets not deterrents and are not only useless but prejudicial to Philippine national interest.) I personally believe that now with the present nuclear capability of Red China and the ABM buildup of the U.S., we need the bases for the defense of the Phil. If China had not developed its nuclear capability we would not need them. Pres. Nixon explained to me last March when Imelda and I attended the Eisenhower memorial services in Washington D.C. how the U.S. would use the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) to counter-act any nuclear threat from Red China.

2. What will happen to our economy, specially the sugar industry if the IS does not extend our special preferences. (Of course the sugar industry would collapse because special preferences or the quota given us in the American market allows us to sell our sugar at the favored price of 7 cents a pound as against 3 cents a pound in the world market. And our cost of production is from 3 to 4 cents a pound. Our dollar earnings from sugar alone is $160 million out of a total dollar earnings of $1.5 billion.)


January 4, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1101 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1201 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1301 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1401 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 15

PAGE 9

Malacañang

Manila

January 4, 1970

Ex-Pres. Macapagal who is visiting in Singapore says that he is shocked by the news that there is supposed to be a secret agreement for the Sabah claim to be relinquished by the Philippines after the resumption of diplomatic relations.

There is no such agreement. I used Mr. Moon Park and Mr. Chang Ming Thieu as emissaries to Prime Minister Tungku Abdul Rahman and Deputy Prime Minister Tun Abdul Ragak so that they would agree to the resumption of diplomatic relations. The Tungku had insisted on such relinquishment of the claim and a recognition formally of the sovereignty of Malaysia over Sabah, but I refused and they formally agreed that after diplomatic relations our two peoples should get used to each other travelling in our respective countries before we spoke of these matters. The Filipinos should now go to Sabah and invest there.

VP Agnew in Thailand and Taipeh has said that I asked him whether America was slowly withdrawing from Asia and he had answered in the negative. I asked Pres. Nixon the same thing. He was more vague, although when he reached the U.S. he did say what Agnew is saying now.

What I want to know is what bases they are going to keep in Asia and what troops where, and under what arrangements

Agnew is quoted as saying he had told me that he had made me understand and that he told me

PAGE 10

Malacañang

Manila

that, of course, the number and location would change with the need.

He told me nothing of the kind.

On the last day of his stay here, Jan. 1st, when I talked to him about the U.S. helping us on our present balance of payments problem, he was evasive. I did not press the point.

Either he has no power to commit the U.S. or he is still feeling his way around.

During the conference at 11:30 AM if Dec. 31st when I met all the special envoys of 44 governments who attended my inauguration, the only matter on which there was some vestige of promise of help was on studies of typhoons and their control. Amb. Byroade is supposed to follow this up.

I impressed on VP Agnew that we in Asia could not make any plans on our security if we did not know their plans but that however even in such state of ignorance we in the Philippines are moving to prepare to defend ourselves on our own.

He invited me to come to the U.S. after September 1970 – preferably not while the other heads of state are in the U.S. on the UN anniversary. I made no commitment on the exact date but did promise to go.

PAGE 11

Malacañang

Manila

Pres. Nixon and VP Agnew strike me as very evasive about helping the Philippines now although they are supporting us in the IMF and IBRD in our efforts to get dollar loans.

I am skeptical about the wisdom of a trip to the U.S.

I have told Sec. Romulo repeatedly that there should be no further talks of the U.S. military bases in the Phil and our wish to remove them as we will use this as the “ultimate weapon” in the trading that may be needed to obtain recognition of our special preferences in the American market. For if our quota on sugar is not extended by the Sugar Act’s extension this year or by treaty in the replacement of the Laurel-Langley agreement, then the sugar industry is wrecked and our economy may be disastrously affected.

So I have told VP Agnew that before the formal negotiations on trade and security start we should have an understanding as to what terms such negotiations would arrive at. I said that I would like Amb. Byroade to be able to sit down with me on this.

PAGE 12

Malacañang

Manila

Rod Reyes, editor of the Manila Chronicle, has just told Kits Tatad that they are planning to serialize the libelous book of Chit Navarro on Imelda.

We have to watch the Lopezes and Montelibano. They are still sore for my veto of their franchise to operate a telephone and telecommunications company anywhere in the Philippines and the NuVue – a cable television company that would select programs from any of the television companies (without permission from the latter) to be flashed to their subscribers by cable. Both were illegal and unconstitutional but they took offense at the veto.

They are the worst oligarchs in the country.

I must stop them from using the government for their own purposes.

Piding Montelibano is working on the reclamation project of Republic Real Estate – pending adjudication in the courts.

Iñing Lopez strongly urged that I appoint Piding as Secretary of Finance, as if the position were vacant. This was a repetition of the recommendation in 1965.

 

PAGE 13

Malacañang

Manila

Peace and order must be immediately attended to.

I must work out the programs for exports and tourism.

Then I must appoint the replacement of Gov. Calalang as Governor of the Central Bank. The IMF consultative group arrives in Jan. 10th.

There are more than 100 CFI vacancies, 7 Court of Appeals, one in the Supreme Court and another vacancy coming up in February.

The Armed Forces has too many hold-overs who should be retired.

We must change the strategy in Central Luzon against the Huks. We must restudy the use of civilians either as agents or informers.

There are three basic problems that I am personally attending to:

  1. Peace and Order
  2. Balance of Payments
  3. Land Reform

Exports and Tourism come under the 2nd and Central Luzon under the 1st.