November 2, 1944

Must hurry writing this stuff because Joe’s waiting for me outside. Nothing much today. None of the usual processions to the cemetery to visit the dead. Tribune says that Laurel will give a speech on the heroes that died in O’Donnell.

On my way to Dad’s office, I saw many Jap trucks filled with supplies. They’re spreading their dumps to minimize destruction from bombing. They’re very afraid of raids. You ought to see how they scramble to their dugouts when they hear the siren. The Filipinos laugh at them and they get sore when our countrymen stay out in the streets and watch the U.S. bombers drop their cargoes.

There are sentries in many street corners again. They’re afraid of guerrillas. The City is full of these patriots and nobody can tell when they’re going to attack the Japs. This keeps the Jap on nerve’s edge and he’s very nasty these days.

The Japs are commandeering horses. First, they took cars, now it’s horses and bicycles too, according to Sal Neri. Damaso said that he saw gasoline tins being moved into our former house. Oh by the way, they paid us a couple of worthless Jap bills for rent. I felt like laughing. I don’t know why.

Many Jap soldiers walking in the streets. They haven’t got trucks. Transportation is a big problem for them. They try to bum rides from anybody.

Saw Formosan soldiers –you can tell when they’re Formosans because they’re very thin and underfed– building foxholes and dugouts. I wonder if they’re going to put up a stiff fight in the city.

Three main questions in the minds of people these days

First: When will they land in Luzon?

Second: Will there be heavy fighting in Manila?

Third: Will the Japs bring the Puppet President and his cabinet to Japan?

There is a fourth question any everybody more or less knows the answer but ask it anyway: What will the Americans do to the collaborationists like Aquino and Laurel?

P.S.

Dad have a good one during dinner time today. “Did you ever notice the names of our three Presidents?” he asked. “Yes, why?” I asked. Mrs. Quezon’s name is Aurora meaning Dawn; Mrs. Osmeña’s is Esperanza, which means Hope; and Puppet Laurel’s wife is Paciencia, which means Patience. We had our morning, our birth under Quezon, Osmeña’s regime is now filled with hope; and you certainly have to have a lot of patience during this regime of Laurel.


September 24, 1944

Its been a lonely day. No bombs. No siren. Nothing but wait and wait and wait from morning to afternoon to late this evening.

We’ve moved part of our furniture already. I can’t describe how sad it feels to leave a house you’ve occupied for more than thirty years. But what can we do? These Japanese don’t know the meaning of kindness, not to mention justice.

There are rumors that landings have been effected somewhere in Camarines and in Atimonan, Tayabas. A BIBA chauffeur reported that American tanks have landed in Camarines. I’m keeping my fingers crossed. I hope this isn’t a false alarm.

A 1000-ton Japanese ship was set ablaze this morning at Pier 7 by Filipino guerrillas, according to a Japanese officer who talked to Joe Meily this afternoon. He said that “the Filipino terrorists” have not been apprehended.

Sal Neri came over this afternoon. He said that members of the Military Police inspected the house of Pedro Vera and Miguel Cañizares at four o’clock yesterday morning. “They were looking for transmitters,” he stated.

Another Japanese officer came to the house this afternoon. There is no such thing as privacy these days. We had a short conversation. He told me that he came from New Guinea. I asked “How was Hollandia?” He closed his eyes, shrugged his head and said “So very terrible.”

At about 10 o’clock this morning, Japanese soldiers living in the house across the street ran to their fox holes like frightened chickens. Apparently U.S. planes were sighted. Traffic was stopped in Santa Mesa street until noon time, according to Joe Meily.