Wednesday, Jan. 10, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_012

 

Met w Lim re Castillo.

A rumpus develops re Galvez.

Lim says Valdes will not use favouritism anymore. I laugh. Look at the case of Galvez. Amado was present to give light on how Valdes extended Galvez. Favouritism again. Valdez circularized me re this mutt, and I indicated that he was no grad, yet he gave him an extension because Galvez father had spoken to Valdez at wedding of Aguilar’s daughter and had also written him a letter.

Where are we going to end.


Monday, Jan. 8, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_010

Schedule of breakfast & conference at Malacanang suspended probably due to Pampanga strike.

Conference w Lim, Garcia, De Jesus, [illegible] re atand on reorganization. De Jesus or [illegible] will propose separation of Constabulary.

I am preparing the synopsis of stand of Gen. Staff.

Centro Escolar — Mrs. Mendez & Mrs. Rodriguez want auxiliary service organized in their school. I believe they want to use this information for advertisement.


Saturday, Jan. 6, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_008

Conference at Malacanang — 11:00 to 1:15

Present — Sec Sison, Valdes, Francisco, Lim, Garcia, Segundo, [illegible], De Jesus

Subject — Justification of proposed cut of budget. Loss of confidence in MacArthur expressed by the Pres. He expects MacArthur to pull out when budget is reduced.

McA failures — He failed to tell Pres. that 16 million is only for training purposes. He failed to explain Mindanao defense. He places too much confidence on contingencies that may not happen.

Trend of the President’s thoughts —

1. Country can not defend itself under present plan

2. Money could be better used by altering present plans.

3. Peoples that have interest in the govt must be the ones to be prepared as then they shall defend the govt.

4. Interest of American armament — to be able to dictate terms of peace at end of war.

5. Japanese interest — to share in wealth of country, to be master of the Orient. Pres. Q does not believe Japan will come to the Phil and risk a war with America as America is one of her best trade customers.

Pres. Q. requests the General Staff to exert its utmost to provide the countrys defense after McA. leaves.

Pres. Q. argues with Gen. Staff memo on reduction of budget. The Army needs as presented are considered vital by him.

 

 

 

Played Polo today —


Thursday, January 4, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_006

 

General Conference at Malacanang — 10:30-1:00

Subject — Defensibility of Islands —

Present: Sec. Sison, McA, Sutherland, Lim, Garcia, Segundo, [illegible], De Jesus, Magtoto — President Q Presiding–

Discussion — Pres. outlines history of McA. [illegible] Defensibility of Islands —

McA. quizzed by the Pres. on basis of his plan — Does it envision US.N. employment

McA. says no — He pretends his plan is self sufficient. He outlines Far Eastern balance of power as the thing that will insure independence. His opinion is six months of war, after that intervention by US or other power. He fails to answer Pres. Q on question of Mindanao —

Gen. Staff — opinion on budget reduction presented.

 

 

Called as witness. Quintero case.


Friday, June 2, 1939

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_052

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_053

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_054

[page 1]

Meeting at MacArthur’s Office. Present. His staff and the general staff.

Macarthur talks at length on the history of scattered camps, trying to justify their establishment. He recognizes however the fact that in as much as the president relieves him of the political phase of the national defense, he (MacArthur) has no more alternative. He appointed a preparatory committee consisting of Eisenhower, Southerland and myself to present recommendation in a month. MacArthur insinuated that the subject of concentration was brought to the president’s attention not thru him. This was a wrong procedure, he says as when a subject is presented to the president, there should be combined agreements and opinion of all the military men concerned. Divided opinions of military men

[page 2]

on military subject always destroys the effectiveness. At the end of the conference, Lim said that when the president calls for the information direct from us, we don’t have the alternative but give the information to him, insinuating thereby that the question of concentration was asked by the president himself. This insinuation of Lim is false as Lim himself used the concentration issue as one of the causes of his resignation by claiming that on this vital issue, he would not agree with the military advisers office. (On our way to Malacañan, Lim made a remark to me in which he implied that he was the author of the concentration. This is more of Lims habitual lies. I wrote the study originally

[page 3]

without consultation with Lim. There are several other cases where Lim tried to steal credit for original ideas.


Wednesday, May 17, 1939

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_040

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_041

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_042

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_043

[This entry is written in the hand of Lourdes, daughter of the author, and seems to have been dictated by the author]

[page 1]

Lim takes his oath. The Military Adviser’s Office, all the Philippine Army officers from Lt Col up and all the officers of the Constabulary from [?] up in Manila except Gen Francisco, present. Members of the Cabinet also present. After the oath taking and picture taking, the President directs that all P.A. and Constabulary officers remain. He starts by saying that what he was going to say was the result of his intuition and that nobody had told him. He said he was going to talk with his “corazon en tu mano.” He felt that there was no full cooperation between the Scout Officers and the Const. Officers. He said the Scout Officers fill [feel] themselves superior because of their training and Const. Officers are jealous and suspicious because the Scout Officers are getting the rank away from them. At the beginning of the Nat. Def there were only two sources from which I could draw the officer personnel with which to build the Army — the Constabulary & the Scouts. The Constabulary had proven to be good police officers. Since the P.I. Army is the same gov’t, I did not doubt their loyalty since the Scout Officers were officers of the [illegible] I was not sure of their loyalty but

[page 2]

by _______ I inferred that they were also loyal because loyalty to America doesn’t mean their loyalty to their own country. And I was very glad indeed when a delegation of these officers came to see me to offer their services. In this visit of their repres. I gathered from the conversation that they were apprehensive of the future of the Nat. Def. unless a man of mil training was selected as chief-of-staff. You know, I appointed Santos, a retired major of the Constabulary, without any mil training, passing over Gen Valdes who was then Chief of Const. and several Cols and Lt. Cols. senior to him. This was a test of loyalty for the senior Const. officers and also for the Scouts, because of their stand as to who the chief of staff should be. I found that the Const. officers were loyal, & I was very glad indeed when the Scout officers volunteered their services for then I was doubly sure of their loyalty despite the Santos selection. Then happened the unfortunate incident when sev. of the Scout officers left the Phil. Army. I was mad and I told Gen. MacArthur to get rid of all the Scout officers but I started my own investigation & found that there was a misunderstanding more our fault than theirs. We did not keep

[page 3]

our side of the bargain; we did not live up to our promise. The officers that stayed after this proved themselves again to be loyal to the gov’t. I am going to get back most of these officers who left the Phil. Army –not all of them. You of Const. have no kick. Some of you have received two or three promotions. Were it not for the Phil. army many of you would die majors whereas many of you are Cols & Lt Cols today. The Const. are not trained in a mil. sense. Naturally, they do not do the mil. work of this army. Most of the Scout officers were trained as young men in the U.S. They served long years in the U.S. Army, doing nothing but mil. work. Some of them have had further schooling in U.S. Army Schools. They each have the the experience of commanding big bodies of troops. I don’t understand why misunderstanding should arise and I want both groups of officers to feel alike & equal in manhood and worthiness. I found many liars and crooks among the Const. officers, [?] of courts-martial who don’t appreciate the seriousness of lying and cheating, & I want to get rid of these officers. This is the only way we can build our army, as no army is better than its corp of officers. I am going to clean up this army of all its

[page 4]

crooks! I want you to honor, respect & love that uniform, love it more than your wife, your children & home. By your own sense of honor you should refuse to associate with these liars and crooks who are wearing this uniform and you should clean them up yourselves! He concluded by saying he wanted to thank the Mil. Adv. for his services, & the Scout officers for their loyalty

& the former Const. officers for their loyalty.

He mentioned about the the ultimate goal of the man who goes to U.S.M.A. by saying that preparation is for his own people & not for the U.S. this is shown by the fact that Annapolis grads are not commissioned in the US Navy.

In talking about the Scout officers that left the Phil. Army, he mentioned the fact that these Scout officers are not given the rank that used to be given to Amer. officers detailed in the Const. He said that any Capt. detailed in the Const. was made a full Col. The reason for this is clear he said. These Amer. officers were temporarily assigned to the Const, whereas these Scout officers are to occupy permanent position in the Phil. Army.


Wednesday March 29, 1939

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_034

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_035

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_036

 

President Quezon sends for us. [Vicente] Lim sends me a radio to Dau. Breakfast at Lim with Garcia.
 
Present at meeting –Pres. Q. Sec[. Jorge B.] Vargas and the three of us, later Auditor Hernandez and Comptroller Marabut. Pres. Q[uezon] asks this Question to Gen V.[aldes] Gen[eral], what do you understand to be your relation to the Military Advisor? Valdes stutters and could not answer promptly. Pres. Q. again asks Do you receive orders or advice from the Military Adviser? Valdes says sometimes he receives orders, sometimes advice. Pres. Q. tries to find the paper containing Sutherland’s indorsement to the Concentration study of mine. He could not find it from a stack of papers, so I open my confidential file which I brought with me and tell the Pres.[ident] that this may be what he was looking for. He looked at it and says yes. Pres Q[uezon] then asks Valdez how he interpreted the indorsement saying, Gen V[aldes] how do you understand this indorsement? Do you take it as an order or as an advice. Gen V.[aldes] says it is an order. Pres. Q.[uezon] then says the military adviser is adviser to him and not to the general staff so that he is going to redefine the relation of the military adviser to him.
 
He says “I have never seen this study” referring to the Concentration plan. “Gen. L.[im] says in his letter of resignation which by the way he did not sign which is the very proper way that the army will fail because we are training hundreds of thousands of reservists without the necessary number of officers — I am not a soldier but I need not be one to one that it will fail if this condition there.
 
Lim made an issue of Southerland’s indorsement on the subject of concentration as a point where he would not agree with the military adviser in his letter of resignation Lim says that he signed the letter of resignation but the president said he did not. My conclusion is that Lim is again lying. He handed an unsigned resignation for fear that such resignation is accepted if signed. He signed the other letter in which he told of the president’s previous advices to him on his military career.
 
We discussed the obsolete of the rifle that is being purchased. This is the reason why Hernandez and Marabut were called in.

January 5, 1938 Wednesday

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_008

 

Father died at 12:05 this am.

Rode as usual.

Appeared before Lim of Duty Bd. Col. Dyer, Capt MC & Lt. Roberts.

[illegible] Vic and Chick.

Conference with Ord re maneuvers. Transmitted orders to Gen Francisco, Liaison off.

Rode with usual pupils.

Went to Frank at noon and again in evening to help entertain visiting [illegible].

[illegible], Arguelles, etc.


April 30, 1936

Called at Dr. Sison’s. I must go completely on the waterwagon. Went to the Bureau of Science–then to Malacañan where I talked for half an hour with Dawson (from Shanghai) of the United States Department of Agriculture. He has been here for some weeks studying the agricultural situation: says the Filipinos are the most “agriculturally minded” people he has ever known, and that many alert minds are busy on the problem of diversification of crops. Dawson reports the tobacco crops in the Cagayan valley are almost a failure from drought.

Saw Hartendorp and had a telephone from Dosser in Baguio. Tried to help out troubles for both.

Paulino Santos has been appointed Chief of Staff of the Army and a Major General–best man possible, and he will still be allowed to carry on as Director of Prisons–this will take him from Malacañan. Reyes also is made a Major General and Provost Marshal, Dr. Valdes a Major General, Vicente Lim also a General–all good selections.

Talked with Lapointe who has just come up from Antimonan where he is building a nipa shack in his coconut grove.

Went to the Aquarium which seems rather neglected. Called on Jim Ross to get his opinion concerning Americans becoming Philippine citizens. He agreed with Dewitt that this act does not impair American citizenship.