July 10, 1942

Thinking of Pagu. At a dinner at the Hotel with Major Nishimura, I asked about Pagu. The interpreter said in broken Spanish: “Ese para muerto ya” and he made a gesture with his hands as though slitting his throat. I got pale. I said: “But he is a very good man. He is very needed..

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July 10, 1942

I talked to some released prisoners. They recounted the treatment they had received at the concentration camp. They were not maltreated nor molested, nor even required to work, especially the Filipinos. Their release was undoubtedly an act of magnanimity, although the skeptics believe that it was due to the lack of food for their sustenance...

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July 9, 1942

Invited to a pancitada by Dr. Gregorio San Agustin at a dinner by the Bureau of Animal Industry to some 20 Japanese veterinarians. Fukada, Naric Supervisor-de-Facto, notified me that all goods of the National Trading Corporation at 1010 Azcarraga had been taken by the Army. Told Philip to stop listening to foreign broadcasts. You can’t..

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July 8, 1942

Mr. Toyama, a very nice, educated Japanese, employee of Mitsui, will teach the family Japanese, twice a week in the evenings. My son Vic refused to study. He said “It’ll be a dead language, after this war.” I told him: “You don’t lose anything by studying Japanese.” Naric Inspection Division will now survey the makers..

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July 8, 1942

Jerry fried out some pork and he gave me some of the crisp remains. It tasted so good and I was so hungry for it that I cried over it and couldn’t talk. He fried up some rice with the grease, and June and I ate it with our fingers, out of a bowl. Jerry..

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July 8, 1942

We are tired of waiting for the permission to open classes, or to put it better, we are getting desperate following up our request. We have therefore decided to give special lessons on the high school level even without official accreditation. No school has yet been authorized to reopen classes, and the students are getting..

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July 5, 1942

During the past week, a good number of Filipino prisoners of war were released by the Japanese Army. According to reports, those released are the sick and wounded, or those captured in places which are already under control. Their number has risen to more than 1,200. This fact would mean that the ratio of sick..

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July 4, 1942

No parades, no celebrations—in public. Cozy little parties, drinks, dancing, singing—in private. The Filipinos have learned to celebrate on July 4th. More trouble from Mr. Inada. Mr. Felix Gonzalez, formerly Bulletin reporter, presented his resignation. Said he couldn’t stand Inada’s arrogance. Inada shouted at Gonzalez for not knowing mess hall regulations. Gonzalez answered him in..

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