Dec. 25, 1943

Like spiders crawling in every direction from the center of a web, all of the 450 internees were coming from the bodega with carts, sacks, poles, ropes—anything that would help carry forty-seven pounds or more [for the Red Cross packages]. If only the people at home could have seen it! Morale soared so high that people went..

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December 24, 1943

The Vice-Rector of Letran College has returned from a trip to the South. According to him, the guerrillas are continuing their war activities although there is a prevailing state of no belligerence. The pacified zone extends some more into Cebu and Panay, but in both zones, peace is uncertain. The embers of hostility continue glowing..

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December 23, 1943

Christmas will be more gloomy and depressing than those of the past two years, and there would be fewer gifts. Not because there was a proliferation of unemployment—the Army was employing all those who were willing to work in fortification projects into which the whole archipelago was being converted. There is money aplenty, so much..

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December 8, 1943

Two years of war! How short the time seems to be when one looks back! And how long and interminable when one looks forward! If we would say that the war would last another two years in the Pacific, we would have been branded dreamers or augurers. However, chi lo sa. The same could last..

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December 3, 1943

Soldiers teemed in streets, plazas, stores and restaurants. And there were rumors that more than half a million more were coming to fortify the country and eat up the little food supply that we had. From the port there were days when more than forty damaged battleships and transports were seen anchored at the Bay...

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December 1, 1943

The problem of scarcity was getting to be so acute as to create fear of serious unrest among the suffering masses. In Pasay, the people looted the market and, in an instant, the stalls had been cleaned out. The pillage was caused by the very high prices of foodstuff. A sack of rice cost ₱180.00...

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November 22, 1943

No traces of the American fleet were left in the Solomon waters. In five battles fought in three days in the vicinity of Bougainville, Tokyo radio had annihilated the enemy force. Within the period from October 27 to November 17, the Japanese Air Force destroyed 80 ships most of which were battleships, forty landing crafts..

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November 21, 1943

As a result of the typhoon, days of hunger were predicted. Rice plants which were due to mature were destroyed in two-thirds of the provinces around the capital. Presaging scarcity, the price of rice catapulted to one hundred forty pesos. A kilo of camote cost ₱1.80 from the thirty centavos (₱0.30) a week ago, and..

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November 18, 1943

Four days of typhoon and devastating floods. Rarely had I seen such torrential rains, and certainly never during this month of November. The flood was high in all streets and ground floors of buildings in all districts of Manila, except Intramuros. The electric plant was inundated and the big light factory of Laguna blew up..

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