2nd January 1945

Koiso ate his words yesterday or perhaps took a bigger mouthful. In a New Year's Day radiocast he proclaimed that Leyte was no longer decisive; "the entire Philippines…is the crucial battlefield." The Burmese military cadets are out on furlough over the holidays and the Burmese military attache has been hunting all over the city for..

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6th day, January 2, 1945

[In Negros] We had a sumptuous dinner last night—chickens, asparagus, green beans and adobo—for the first time in three years. I heard radio music and a news broadcast. Col. Andrews gave me immediately “Lucky Strikes” and sen-sen gum. I slept soundly last night. This morning we have real good coffee, genuine fresh butter and American..

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January 1, 1945

Started the day with weak lugao and still weaker coffee. Air raid alarm at 10:30 a.m. Forty of our big planes, flying very high. Went north. No rough stuff around here. The Japs celebrating today. They killed a pig last night. Had a cup of fairly good soup for lunch. All clear went before 1:00..

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1st January 1945

Almost on the stroke of twelve the air-raid siren sounded. We were having a New Year’s Eve dinner at the embassy and the sound of the signal made everyone homesick. We fell silent around the table and looked at one another, remembering Manila before the war where the sirens of the government ice-plant and the..

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Jan. 1, 1945

This is not what I would call a happy new year but at least it is a hopeful one; indications are that Japs are going to pull out and may leave us behind. I now weigh 137½ lbs, having lost 30 lbs since Feb 7, 1944 when gate was closed to food parcels and starvation..

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5th day, January 1, 1945

1944 has passed away for over an hour when I woke under the open skies on board this sail boat with no wind blowing. Our ship’s sails are just flapping lazily, while two of the crew sing both English & Visayan melodies. We have a very quiet New Year’s. A few hours before sunrise, the..

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