September 26, 1944

Am very tired, fagged out. Carrying furniture and bags the whole day. We've moved to a small bungalow in V. Mapa. The Japs have taken our house in the name of "co-prosperity and cooperation" and a lot of potatoes to that effect. Only happy note of the day has been the 72-hour ultimatum. You've probably..

Read more

September 25, 1944

To write or not to write, that is the question... nope, this isn't Shakespeare... just a terribly impatient mutt who's praying for bombs, bombs, and more bombs. Gerry Roxas and Tato Liboro were here yesterday. The young kids are anxious to join guerrilla units. Morale has been very high ever since U.S. planes showed up...

Read more

September 23, 1944

Manila's agog. Everybody's talking and whispering and laughing and dreaming about the raid. Everybody feels the Americans will be here before Christmas. Somebody opined "around New Year" and he was branded a low-down defeatist. A thousand pseudo-generals have sprung with theories on how easily the Americans will retake Luzon. Despite the very tense situation, Manoling's..

Read more

September 22, 1944

Didn't know we still had baloney these days until I read the Tribune. It was crying out loud about Filipinos being angry due to the inhuman acts of American aviators. More baloney: Laurel declares the Philippines under martial law. The problem with our puppet president is that he doesn't leave his room in Malacañang. If..

Read more

September 21, 1944

[Note: after the last previous entry, April 20, 1942, the diary resumes at this point.] U.S. planes bombed Manila this morning and afternoon. They came from the northeast like a hundred daggers stabbing through a cloudy sky. They were dark, thick-set, chunkily-built, short-winged, heavy-nosed birds. They had an ominous roar, that rose in an ever-deepening..

Read more

April 21, 1942

Capas, Tarlac F.C. Camp Joined the grave-detail. We buried those that died this morning. Some of the graves yesterday were not dug deep enough. The bodies buried yesterday have been unearthed. The sand here is clayish because the cemetery is too near the river. One of the boys we buried had a little piece of..

Read more

April 20, 1942

F.C.C. Capas, Tarlac Found a good friend, Toots Rivera. He is in charge of one of the kitchens. He gave me two "camotes." It was a feast. We talked about the long walk from Bataan to this place. He estimates that about 18,000 perished in that bloody march. Someday I intend to write about it,..

Read more

April 19, 1942

Concentration Camp Capas, Tarlac Great day. Dr. Escoto of the Red Cross was able to enter our camp. He was called by the Camp Commander because the Jap guard is sick. He passed our quarters, gave medicines for the boys with dysentery and malaria. He left bottles of quinine and sulfa-thiasol to the medical officers...

Read more