Saturday, April 29th, 1899

Manila, Luzon Island – Entry made in parlor of No. 2 Calle Santa Elena, Tondo

Cloudy but no rain. Sun out at times. Cool at times also, when gusto of wind stirred. No trouble to perspire.

Read a chapter in Leviticus & one psalm. Prayed. Cooked breakfast, washed dishes then with Rev. Owens boarded a Jolo St. car & got off in Quiapo Dist. & proceeded to the Imperial Photograph gallery. Looked at the negative of my house; seems to be quite good. Said they will be printed next Monday. The negatives from Kodak films will also be ready. Purchased 3 photographs.

Went to the post office; no mail.

On the Escolta I met Bro. A. J. Merritt, a Salvationist who was converted about 8 months ago in San Francisco No. 2. He is a recent arrival. Is in the Government service as a boss packer. Has charge of Pack Train No. 2, with 13 men & 65 mules under him. Had years of experience as a Gov’t Packer in mountain countries. Expects to leave for Lawton’s command in 2 or 3 days. I believe Merritt is a good man – anyway he looks it. Also said he read my Philippine articles in the War Crys, and that the soldiers & comrades of No. 2 and 6 send regards to me.

Dropped in the “Freedom” office & bought 3 backnumbers; also bought or rather paid in advance for 2 copies of the extra edition for circulation in the U.S.; 1 copy is to be sent to Lt.-Col. Wm Brener, 124 W. 14th St. New York & 1 to the Lt.-Col. Wm Evans, San Francisco paid 30 cts. Mex a copy, which includes postages.

Commenced an article for “All the World”. Wrote 8 pages. yesterday evening there came in on the train from the north. 2 Filipino officers, Col. Manuel Arguello [Arguelles] & Lieut.-Col. Jose Vernal [Bernal], to see Major General Otis regarding terms of peace. Rumor, newspaper & verbal says Aguinaldo wishes a cessation of hostilities until the Filipino Congress meets in May, when they will consider his proposition. Otis listened but granted not the request.

Tuesday, April 25th, 1899

Manila, Luzon Island – Entry made in parlor of No. 2 Calle Santa Elena, Tondo

Paid rent for the month of April, to Mrs. Ysabel Wood – Amount $35. Mexican silver. This money is for No. 2 Calle Santa Elena, Manila. My landlady instead of asking rent in advance was content to let the month get pretty well on before sending her usual recibo to “Juan Major Milsaps”. Paid her the money. Read a chapter or two in Leviticus, a psalm & prayed, then cooked breakfast. In company with Rev. Owens went to the post office. Was handed out some more papers.

Purchased some more shells for my cabinet from a Filipino. Am keeping a sharp look out for different for different kinds. Want to make my collections as complete as possible. Also purchased groceries and treated my companion to a couple of oranges.

Hurried back home. Capt. Morrison, his daughter Agnes & a little girl from Australia a sea Captain’s daughter were awaiting my return to hear the gramophone. Gave them their desire in the matter.

Dinner peanuts, an orange & lemonade.

Supper, oatmeal mush, fried bacon and cocoa.

Company claimed more of my time than I cared to give. Private D. G. Hines & “Red” another soldier, called re preparing for a stereopticon. To Hines I gave a New Testament & 2 War Crys to take to Bro. Schumerhorn – No. 1 Reserve Hospital.

Bro. Clayton Scott rode up on his poney. Had a brief spiritual talk & prayer together. He informed me of a Salvationist – a packer – just over with the last batch of U.S. Government mules. His name is A. J. Merritt. Belongs to S. F. No. 2 Corps. Gave Scott 2 War Crys to read & pass on to the new comer.

Tried to write more for “Harbor Lights”, but made little progress. Bothered too much. This knocks an expected trip to the country in the head. I must catch the next mail.

The Utah Artillery sentinel captured a Filipino man this afternoon with his revolver. The Filipino is a prisoner of war. Was taken to the Utah quarters & by making himself useful to the soldiers won their good will & secured the freedom of the troops. Commenced to dress in spotless white. Lately he contracted the habit of holding up Chinese & robbing them. Tried it this afternoon. Struck a Chinese on the head. When I saw the men, blood was running down the face of the Chinese. Mr. Filipino’s priviledges will probably be restricted now.

News is coming in this evening late that Calumpit was captured. Some of our men were killed & wounded; ditto the enemy. I heard that an advance to be made to the next town forthwith.

God blessed me with His love last night.