February 22, 1950

Holiday for E.C.A. but I worked, finishing odds and ends and getting my report polished up. With Foster Knight lunched at Capt. Rayon’s [Razon] house, with Sr. deLeon, former Commissioner of Customs, and Sr. Francisco (of the Dalupan Committee). De Leon said that getting rid of political influence in the Customs is even more important than raising pay. He was very bitter against the politicians. Capt. Razon said that the Philippine people have lost all confidence in, and respect for, the government. He intimated strongly that the best thing that would happen to the Philippines would be re-occupation by the USA.

Had an hour’s chat on the general situation and the E.C.A. program with Charles Glaser and David Sternberg. The latter is a cripple and confined to a wheel chair. He knows the country and the people pretty intimately. One thing that worries Glaser and Sternberg is the apathy of the people toward reform. They can’t understand why the common people are not more excited about the failure of the Congress to pass the Minimum Wage Law. Sternberg says they are “politically illiterate.” To buffet dinner given by Admiral Giles Stedman at Elks Club. Invited for 7:30 and arrived at 7:30. Dinner served at 9:30 —- by which time I was fit to be tied. I still dislike this type of entertaining intensely. Fortunately, I had a table with Mr. and Mrs. Huie. Mr. Huie was in Navy during war (Commander) and had his ship blown out from  under him in Manila Bay. Lost 40% of his complement. After occupation he was ordered to go to Santo Tomas, get a Chinese and his family and put them on a destroyer. He took 16 men, all armed to the teeth, and and finally found the family. He has forgotten the name but says the man was T.V. Soong’s secretary. Mrs. Huie was Miss Gloysteen, of Peking. She is very charming and easy on the eye. We have many friends in common. She spent a summer at Sacconnet, R.I. when she was at Smith took care of two children. Later, taught at Tingchow. I told her that I went to Junior Prom at Smith the year she was born (1914). Rotary Club had. a “Barrio Fiesta” on the lawn of the hotel tonight, and it was most colorful. Many of the American women wore the Philippine woman’s costume, and some of the American men wore Filipino “pina” shirts.

February 6, 1950

To lunch here: Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Sycip (formerly Bonnie Liu). Mr. Sycip’s grandfather came to Manila from Amoy. His Chinese name was “Hsueh”, which is pronounced “Si” in Amoy dialect. The origin of the “cip” is unknown, but probably the Amoy pronunciation of another Chinese character. In the Spanish days, anybody who was baptized into the Catholic Church became ipso facto a Spanish subject. Sycip grandpére was baptized and given the Christian name Jose Larade Sy. My other guests were Charles Glaser of E.C.A. and Chapman, whom I met once in Shanghai. He used to be with Mackay radio, but is now retired. He had the next bed to W.H. Donald while interned at St. Tomas and was with him in Shanghai when he died — and a bearer at his funeral. He told me that he has a verbatim record of many of Donald’s stories and recollections made during internment. He has sent to America for them, and will let me see them if they arrive before I leave. He said that Donald would never have permitted the publication of “Donald of China” had he lived. Donald paid the author of that book $4,000! He could have gotten 25 to 50 thousand dollars from the S.E.P. or Time for his autobiography.

Had an hour’s talk with Jacinto in the office. He is very anxious to prepare legislation to improve the Customs organization, and wants me to get Bradley out here as soon as possible to help him. Spoke to Cecchi about it. Called on Donn Muni (away for a week), Wilkins (Manila Bulletin) and Ramon Escoda. Col. Miguel Enriquez came to my room at 9 a.m. to hand me copies of documents prepared last June by the reorganization committee of the Ministry of Finance setting forth a plan of reorganization of the Customs. (This was before the Bell Mission was formed.)