Thursday, August 18th, 1898

It is raignen all day again we have 3 good Meals to day 10 men where send to Camp I was among we brought up most of the Camp Material the old Camp looks verry much deserted chistopher Shanaberger Collins and Cullinus remained on the Sick List

It is raining all day again. We have three good meals today. Ten men were sent to camp, I was among them. We brought up most of the camp materiel. The old camp looks very much deserted. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [William D.] Collins and [Grant] Cullums remained on the sick list.

Wednesday, August 17th, 1898

It is raignen all Morning but the afternon is clear Sullivna (Soapy) is baking Buiscit for Supper the where fine too we will try and Keep him at for we have plenty Flour we also have fresh Meat now and exspect to have it every other day our Ration are more regular we are still guarding the prison Co A one day and C the next this gives us plenty of Guard duty we 20 where also ordered to send 20 men to Camp to bring up Headquarter Stuff. christopher Shanaberger Collins and Cullman remain on the Sick List.

It is raining all morning but the afternoon is clear. [Frank] Sullivan (Soapy) is baking biscuits for supper. They were fine too. We will try and keep him at it for we have plenty of flour. We also have fresh meat now and expect to have it every day. Our rations are more regular. We are still guarding the prison, Company A one day and Company C the next. This gives us plenty of guard duty. We were also ordered to send twenty men to camp to bring up headquarters’ stuff. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [William D.] Collins and [Grant] Cullums remain on the sick list.

Tuesday, August 16th, 1898

The Weather is nice and clear in the Morning but in the afternon we have heavy Rain the second Battalion recieves Orders to Guard the Prisons Companies H & D occupie the Theater wich is just across the Street from the prisons and A & C occupie the Guard houses these Quaters are believed to be permament for at least a Week. Co C & A have 15 post a patrol and the look out while Co D & H have seven Post. christopher Shanaberger Collins and Cullman are on the Sick List.

The weather is nice and clear in the morning but in the afternoon we have heavy rain. The Second Battalion receives orders to guard the prisons. Companies H and D occupy the theater which is just across the street from the prisons and A and C occupy the guard houses. These quarters are believed to be permanent for at least a week. Companies C and A have 15 post a patrol and they look out while Companies D and H have seven post. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [William D.] Collins and [Grant] Cullums are on the sick list.

Monday, August 15th, 1898

This Morning we where relieved by Company D H & I the spanich troops left the theater to take up Quarters in the walled City and turn in their Arms we then returned to our Headquarters for the Remainder of the day and Night the Weather has being clear all day christopher Shanaberger Collins W.D and Cullinus Grant are on the Sick List

This morning we were relieve by Companies D, H and I. The Spanish troops left the theater to take up quarters in the walled city and turn in their arms. We then returned to our headquarters for the remainder of the day and night. The weather has been clear all day. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [William] D. Collins and Grant Cullums are on the sick list.

Sunday, August 14th, 1898

This is a beautiful Morning we witness the ceremony of the Natives at the Alter wich we watched with great Interest, about 10 am we where moved to the Fire Dep. Building to take up permament Headquarters for our Regt. Co C. A & B where sent out to relieve the spanich Guard wich was on Guard in the Jail and Pennitentury. This spanich Guard ocupied the theater as Headquarters Co. C. & B occupied the Theater together with the spanich troops Christopher Shanaberger and Wm Collins are still on the Sick List!

This is a beautiful morning. We witnessed a ceremony of the natives at the altar which we watched with great interest. About 10 a.m. we were moved to the Fire Department building to take up permanant headquarters for our regiment. Companies C, A and B were sent out to relieve the Spanish guard which were on guard in the jail and the penitentiary. This Spanish guard occupied the theater as a headquarters. Companies C and B occupied the theater together with the Spanish troops. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [Walter] E. Collins are still on the sick list!

Saturday, August 13th, 1898

The Morning is clear and we returned to Camp after getting Orders to get our Breakfast there and take 2 days Field Ration and 200 Rounds of Amunition we had allready 50 in our Belt while we where eating Breakfast at Camp the Insurgent where still fighting with the Enemy I heard the Captain say that Dewy would commence the Bombardment at ones we where all worn out then but where to anxious to move on the Manila we now heard Dewey Guns open up for a couple of Hours when the City surendered we then fell in line and marched 2 Miles then took the Beach direct for the City this Side of Manila we had to cross a Stream about 200 Yards wide through wich waded through wich was as good as a bath as we neared the City the opened Fire upon us but wecould not tell where the came from most of them passed over our heads into the Water this only lasted about 30 Minute just then Dewys Guns opened up again right over our Heads we renewed our March wich was now trough Water 2 to 3 Feet deep right on the Shore wich is fortified by a 10 Foot High Wall we then marched trough Malata especting every Minute to be fired at from the Houses for we ocasinally heard firing but we marched right on until we stopped in Front of the Forte of the old City Manila wich is souronded by 2 high Walls and 2 Streams right on top of the Fortes we seen the white Flag floating just about one Hour befor we arived here some of our men had accidently discharged his Gun and the Spaniards behind the Fortes opened ther Guns again killing one Men and wounding good many others but our Men (Colorado) did not Return the fire and the Spaniards stopped and it was good for them for Dewy could lay their well build Forts in Aches plus the whole City if nessesary in verry short time after taken a Lunch at this place we moved up into the City it was now 8 o Clock and we stopped right in Front of DeOrient Hotel where Gen. Greens Headquarters are establich we laid here on the Street for 2 hours then we took up our Quarters in a old catholic Cathedral for the Night Everybody was tired and we all slept well although had nothing to sleep on but Tile Floors and Gun blankets Christopher Shanaberger and Wm Collins

 

The morning is clear and we returned to camp after getting orders to get our breakfast there and take two days field rations and 200 rounds of ammunition. We already had 50 [rounds] in our belt. While we were eating breakfast at camp, the insurgents were still fighting with the enemy. I heard the Captain say that [Admiral] [George] Dewey would commence the bombardment at once. We were all worn out then but were anxious to move on to Manila. We now heard Dewey’s guns open up for a couple hours when the city surrendered we then fell in line and marched two miles and took the beach directly across from the city. This side of Manila we had to cross a stream about 200 yards wide through which we waded which was as good as a bath. As we neared the city they open fired on us but we could not tell where it came from. Most of the shots passed right over our heads into the water. This lasted about thirty minutes. Just then, [Admiral] [George] Dewey‘s guns opened up again right over our heads. We renewed out march which was now through water two to three feet deep, right on the shore, which is fortified by a ten foot high wall. We then marched through Malate expecting every minute to be fired at from the houses because we occasionally heard firing but we marched right on until we stopped in front of the fort of the old city of Manila which is surrounded by two high walls and two streams. Right on top of the fort we saw the white flag floating. Just about one hour before we arrived here one of our men had accidentaly discharged his gun and the Spaniards behind the forts opened their guns again killing one man and wounding good many others but our men (Colorado Volunteers) did not return the fire and the Spaniards stopped and it was good for them because [Admiral] [George] Dewey could lay their well-built forts to ashes, plus the whole city if necessary in very short time. After we took lunch at this place we moved up into the city. It was now 8:00 o’clock and we stopped right in front of Oriente Hotel where General [Francis V.] Greene‘s headquarters are established. We laid here on the street for two hours and then we took up our quarters in an old Catholic cathedral for the night. Everybody was tired and we all slept well although we had nothing to sleep on but tile floors and gun blankets. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and William Collins [are on the sick list].

Friday, August 12th, 1898

It still raigns as we are marching from Camp at 8 am to occupy the trenches The Colerado Regts under Colonel Hale occupied the trenches between the Monastery and the Beach to their Right the first Battalion of the 10th Penn Vol. and the Second still further to Right. 12 men of us under Sergt Seamans and Cap Collins where sent on the Outpost a distance of 300 Yards from the Firing Line the Rest of the Company where Buisy all day streghtening the Breast work during the day Mayor Bierer & Captain Bierer made 3 Visit to our Post wich was in a verry dangerous position for some reason wich I am unable to tell we had Orders not to fire unless the Enemy fired first we realised our dangerous position as we could see the Spaniards working on ther Breastworks all day and was allmost in speaking distance from their Outpost everythink was allright during the day and at Night we plased ourselfs so that we could overlook the Field and the Road in Front of this Outpost was also occupied by 14 Natives at about Midnight I first discovered 2 Spaniards about 20 Yards in Front of us the Moon shown quiet bright at times Jno Baird was with me and at first we where at lost what to do but Jno hearing the Whisper of some more taught it best to quietly retreat to the post where the Rest of us where stationed we still occupied a position where we could watchour Enemy up until 3 o clock am everythink was quiet the Natives Soldier had all gone to sleep presently I seen 2 Spaniards passing along the smal Stream only 5 or 6 Feet wide with Bambo Trees on both Sides I called Johns Attention and Cap Collins by that time more than a dozen had passed and more following we realised that we where now handicapped and the all quietly retreated on a Run up the Road. John and I being the last ones to leave as we came to the Breastwork all where sleeping but the Captain I could tell on his face that he didnt liked the Idea for us to retreat and told us to take our post again at day light wich is 430am at promptly 430 we started back on our post and could plainly see that the Spaniards had being there for some had left the Salmon & Hardtacks there but the Hungry creature had taken them with some Ammunition of course we didnt tell the Captain about 5 am our Captain paid us a Visit we showed him the Traces of the Spaniards and he seemed to be convinced that we had done the proper thing he then took a position right on top of our Breatwork to overlook the Field in Front of us just then the firing comencing Heavy and we where ordered in on the sick List are Christopher Shanaberger and W E Collins

It is still raining as we are marching from camp at 8:00 a.m. to occupy the trenches. The Colorado Regiments under Colonel Hale occupied the trenches between the monastery and the beach. To their right, the First Battalion of the 10th Pennsylvania Volunteers and the Second still further to the right. Twelve men of us, under Sergeant [Walter] Semans and Corporal [Charles] Collins, were sent on outpost a distance of 300 yards from the firing line. The rest of the company were busy all day strengthening the breastworks. During the day, Major Bierer and Captain Bierer made three visits to our post which was in a very dangerous position. For some reason, which I am unable to tell, we had orders not to fire unless the enemy fired first. We realized our dangerous position as we could see the Spaniards working on their breastworks all day and we were almost speaking distance from their outpost. Everything was alright during the day and night. We placed ourselves so that we could overlook the field. The road in front of this outpost was also occupied by fourteen natives. At about midnight I first discovered two Spaniards about 20 yards in front of us. The moon shown quite bright at times. John Baird was with me and at first we were lost as what to dol but, John hearing the whisper of some more thought it best to quietly retreat to the post where the rest of us were stationed. We still occupied a position where we could watch over our enemy. Up until 3 o’clock a.m. everything was quiet and the native soldiers had all gone to sleep. Presently I saw two Spaniards passing along the small stream only five or six feet wide with bamboo trees on both sides. I called John’s attention and Corporal [Charles] Collins. By that time more than a dozen had passed and more were following. We realized that we were now handicapped and they all quietly retreated on a run up the road. John and I being the last ones to leave. As we came to the breastworks al were sleeping except the Captain. I could tell by the look on his face that he didn’t like the idea of us retreating and told us to take our post again at daylight which is 4:30 a.m. At promptly 4:30 we started back to our post and could plainly see that the Spaniards had been there because some had left the salmon and hardtack there but the hungry creatures had taken them with some ammunition we, of course, didn’t tell the Captain about. About 5:00 a.m. our Captain paid us a visit. We showed him the traces of the Spaniards and he seemed to be convinced that we had done the proper thing. He then took a position right on top of our breastworks to overlook the field in front of us. Just then, firing commenced heavily and we were ordered in. On the sick list are [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger and [Walter] E. Collins.

Thursday, August 11th, 1898

It still raigns as usual and our dog tents give us as little Shelter as ever There is a “Grabe Vein” Rumor that Dewy is going to bombard Manila to morrow and we are getting our Ration in readines it still raigned as I try to goe to Sleep I hear no firing at all my Messmate Thomes Jone is sicj all Night but never the lest he will try and have Breakfast on the nesct Morning on time we exspect to goe on Outpost in the Morning Christopher Shanaberger Riffle and W E Collins are on the Sick List

It is still raining as usual and our dog tents give us little shelter. As always there is a “grapevine” rumor that Dewey is going to bombard Manila tomorrow and we are getting our rations ready. It is still raining as I try to go to sleep. I hear no firing at all. My messmate, Thomas Jones, is sick all night but never the less he will try and have breakfast in the morning. On time we expect to go on outpost in the morning. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger, [Arthur] Riffle and [Walter] E. Collins are on the sick list.

Wednesday, August 10th, 1898

It is raignen heavy as we are marching in to Camp and all are very tired and hungry but even after our Breakfast we where as Hungry as ever and had to fill up on Bananas Oranges or anythink we could get Hardtack where this day at a premium we rally spent most of the day growling believing firmly that we where not getting our due Ration the Captain gave me some Money to buy Meat but was unable to get any I bought 13 chicken wich where verry poor and we had some chicken Soup for Dinner at 4 p.m. then we backed some Buisket for the next day and carried Word to Camp had to carry it over 3 Miles. Christopher Shanaberger Riffle & W. Collins are on the Sick List

It is raining heavily as we are marching in to camp and we are all tired and hungry and even after breakfast we were as hungry as ever and had to fill up on bananas and oranges or anything we could get. Hardtack was, this day, at a premium. We really spent most of the day growling believing firmly that we were not getting our due rations. The Captain gave me some money to buy meat but I was unable to get any. I bought 13 chickens which were very poor and we had some chicken soup for dinner at 4:00 p.m. We then baked some biscuits for the next day and carried wood to camp… had to carry it over three miles. [Frank] Christopher, [Frank] Shanaberger, [Arthur] Riffle and [Walter] Collins are on the sick list.