October 14, 1943

From now on, the Philippines is free, sovereign and independent. Japan so proclaimed, and President Laurel so announced. The inauguration was a family affair. Only the Japanese representatives were invited: aside from Mr. Murata who up to now is chief adviser of the military administration and henceforth to be the ambassador plenipotentiary; the Vice President of..

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September 4, 1943

In the presence of a captive crowd, the New Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines was publicly signed by the members of the Constitutional Commission. I obtained my copy within hours after the signing, thanks to the goodness of one of the signatories. The first impression one gets from reading the Constitution is that..

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May 16, 1943

Shoreham Hotel. Quezon busy writing a letter in his own hand to Osmeña in answer to a brief submitted to him by the latter. This is the opening gun in the contest between the two for the presidency of the Commonwealth after November 15, 1943. Quezon read me the salient points of Osmeña's brief, all..

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May 12, 1943

At last, Minister Aoki came—and left. What he said and did: the usual speeches, the routinary inspections, the gatherings of captive audiences. But there is a subdued feeling that everything is not going well with the war despite what they would have us to believe. The Rising Sun is probably not as bright as it..

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May 5, 1943

This morning, there was another gathering at the Luneta in honor of Premier Tojo. The invitation to join the crowd was extended to students and members of the religious groups. According to the papers, some 300,000 persons, about one third of the population of the Greater Manila area, came freely and voluntarily to see and..

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December 7, 1942

Today is the eve of the first anniversary of the Pacific war. The propaganda is exerting superhuman efforts to reeducate us, attempting in this way to achieve a double purpose. First, it presents America as a cause and author of this conflict. Roosevelt, with his uncontrolled imperialism, with his policy of enclosure against Japan, is..

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November 24, 1942

I talked to some trainees of the Government Employees Training Institute. A month ago, some three hundred government employees, selected from different offices of the administration and the judicial branches, were confined in one of the public school buildings. They live and sleep there and go out only on Sundays. They spend the days learning..

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November 4, 1942

The official journal of the Japanese Military Administration (Vol. 6) carried what may be called the Bases for the Structuring of Oriental Asia. It was noted previously that these were placed in Tokyo by the Council Ministers and their Japanese advisers without consulting the representatives of the regions which were called brother-members of the Sphere...

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June 19, 1942

I attended a meeting of the directors of private colleges, called and presided over by Secretary Recto of the Department of Public Instruction. There were about a hundred of us, including the Filipino chiefs and the Japanese advisers who, I suspected, did not understand a word of what was being discussed during the three long..

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