February 4, 1950

Fay Bailey called for me and took me to his house. Althea greeted me cordially, and I met the German twins. Jeffrey and Janet who have been at the Brent School in Baguio but are now headed for US Drove out to new Polo Club, which “has everything”, and on a big scale. Bowling alleys, polo field, two swimming pools, badminton courts, and the usual bar and dining rooms, etc. Lunch at the Baileys. Wrote a lot of letters in the afternoon. Dined alone at the hotel my first dinner in the dining room.

February 4, 1950

Fay Bailey called for me and took me to his house. Althea greeted me cordially, and I met the German twins. Jeffrey and Janet who have been at the Brent School in Baguio but are now headed for US Drove out to new Polo Club, which “has everything”, and on a big scale. Bowling alleys, polo field, two swimming pools, badminton courts, and the usual bar and dining rooms, etc. Lunch at the Baileys. Wrote a lot of letters in the afternoon. Dined alone at the hotel my fist dinner in the dining room.

Sun. Dec. 28/41

Leo and I go to the Polo Club to attend a meeting at 8:30 a.m. of all the American men here in Pasay. Discussed a number of things we might do in case of occupation by the enemy. We are supposed to meet at the Manila Sanitarium. We got back to Lerits in time for the Sunday Meeting. Had a nice meeting although few, Mrs. Lerit, Tagumpay, Enrique, Mr. and Mrs. Hernandez, Cecil, Leo, and myself. Most spoke about having confidence in the Lord, and whatever might happen we would have something that even death will not take from us. The
Dolores girls are still in the province and Severa is worrying about them as well as her husband, Luis, and the children. We had dinner at Lerit’s and a big raid came on. They bombed the piers again, and started a fire, but do not know just where it is. Got home about three p.m. Our men are pretty hard pressed according to the news. Willie and Ernest reported a good Meeting at San Andres.

April 28, 1936

At Malacañan. A. D. Williams had just come from a conference with Quezon, Paez and Ramon Fernandez; says the President is set on building railways in Mindanao, and “A.D.” and, Fernandez tried to convince him they would not pay. “A.D.” said he thought he had offended Quezon still more by replying to his (Quezon’s) complaints that the roads offered too unfair competition to the Manila Railroad, that the competition from trucks was unfair and when they had finally managed by January 1, 1936 to get the tax on trucks raised from one peso to two pesos per 100 kilos, the rate had at once been reduced again. This was Quezon’s own doing on the advice of Geo. Vargas, and they both looked pretty glum. (This is the first instance I know since his inauguration where private interests had influenced the President contrary to the public interest.)

“A.D.” also inveighed against the taking of the accounting division out of the Bureau of Public Works and putting it with the others in the new budget office.

He also admitted it was a mistake to have put the Bagagab-Echague road over the mountains–it should have followed the Magat River down stream.

3 to 5 p.m. with the Survey Board quizzing the Directors of the Bureau of Lands and of the Land Registration Office. They sat side by side rather like naughty school boys, each covertly watching the other.

Bridge at the Polo Club, Peters, Satterfield and Ale. Went for a short time to Oleagas “cock-tail supper.”

March 24, 1936

At the office. Miguel Unson, to whom I reported that Quezon told me he had instructed him (Unson) that I was to sit with the Government Survey Board replied: “It must be so because he said so, but I never heard it.” Said he would try again to see Quezon tomorrow.

Usual crowd of office seekers and Others needing help, in my office.

Visit from Hartendorp, Dutch-born American citizen; editor of the Philippine Magazine, who has just received from Vargas his dismissal as Adviser on Press matters. Says Quezon had sent for him before inauguration and had asked him to be Press Adviser at a salary of five hundred pesos monthly. He was flattered and pleased. He has a Filipina wife and children and was proud to be called in by the President. He asked Quezon from whom ho should take orders, and the President replied: “only from me”; thereupon Quezon called in his a.d.c. and gave instructions for the immediate admission of Hartendorp whenever the latter wished. However, Hartendorp soon found that he could not obtain “audience.” He thinks Vargas has “gypped” him, because he had criticized him severely in his magazine.

Hartendorp had rented a house in Uli-Uli, had taken his children out of boarding school, and was about to celebrate his reunion with them in a home when he received his dismissal. When first appointed, he had asked Quezon how long the work was to continue, and Quezon replied “two or three years–or as long as my administration lasts.” Hartendorp lasted three months!!

Talk with A. D. Williams, who suggested buying for the National Development Co. a yacht like Yolanda of 1000 tons for Quezon’s use. Thoroughly good idea!

Williams has just been made a director of the Cebu-Portland Cement Co. which had inherited the Cebu coal field, once the property of our defunct National Coal Co. He says they have just found 350,000 tons of excellent coal there which will lower the cost of cement. (Even our Coal Company was not without some merit!)

Elizalde presided over his last meeting of the National Development Co. this morning. Usual glowing accounts of his management given in Herald which he owns. It seems he thinks the Elizaldes have lost “face” since his resignation as President of the National Development Co. was accepted, so during this week while the President was away the Elizaldes forced an issue in the Polo Club by proposing and seconding Manuel Nieto for membership. (The Polo Club and the Army and Navy Club are the last stand of the “Old Tinier” Americans.) [Nieto was rejected on the ground that he was only Quezon’s “gun-man” (which is very unjust!).] All four Elizaldes thereupon resigned from the club and took their polo team to the practice field in Camp Claudio. They are now seeking to lead the army polo players away from the Polo Club–but in vain.

The late General Tinio’s son (nephew of Don Isauro Gabaldon) came in to see me with the request that he be appointed technical assistant to me. It seems that Assemblyman Angara of Tayabas had asked his uncle (Quezon) to make this appointment without consulting me, and Vargas had told him in reply that if “Governor Harrison had need of a technical assistant, it might become possible later on”!!!!