Sunday, February 5th, 1899

The Weather was fine all Night and we patrolled the City at 8 o Clock we ate Breakfast on the Sheet Bread and Coffee at 10 o Clock 40 of the Company filled their Haversack with Ammunition 300 per men and carried the same to the Front all returned but 4 or 5 I stayed myself with the Colonel permission I laid along side of the right to H Company I Kept 100 Rounds myself we continued a Heavy Fire on the Enemy wich was stationed all along the lines but the strongest Fort they had in Filipino Hospital but the Utah Battery soon put shell after shell into it and a few Minutes later we made a charge all Boys along the line cheered as we advanced Keeping on firing as we went this made them run in all direction most of them fleed to the chinese Hospital about mile further back here we laid flat down into the Riece Field but the where now a good deal too much for us they just poured their led in to us but in short time C Co arived I now retreated to my Company and laid between Charlie Playford and Milbert Johnson we laid here for a full Hour but firing was most impossible for us and seeing that we couldnt stand their Fire we crept on Hands and Feet to the right wich was a Hillside on wich was a chinese Cemetary with thousands of Tombstone for Breastwork but it had a strong Wire Fence around it wich made it hard to cross with our Guns and Ammunition here 2 of our Company where wounded and a few Minutes later Major Bierer was hit with a Bras Bullet through the left Shoulder and Arm the 2 men where Carl Debold and Jourg Rockwell both where also hit with Brass Bullets through their Shoulders these where huridly carried back by our Men here opened up on them for about 2 hours the Rebels putting up a stubborn fight but after a couple Hours Work of the Battery we again made a desperate Fight and the Rebels soon had to flee from their many of them where Killed now we (10th) Kept over to the right while South Dakota men took charge of the Hospital we now entered a Filipino Cemetary here the Sharp shooters of the Rebels wich where all around us in Front of us in trees and Bushes done some fine Work and wounded a good many of our Men but not dangerous but we opened up on them after finding some safe place but soon most of us where out of Ammunition but it was at Hand in a short time their the Bugel sounded for a charge now in Front of us on the Hill was a large church with a strong 10 Foot Wall around it and right in the rear of it was a Blockhouse and about 200 Yards in Front of the church to the right was a little Village contaning about 50 smal “Shaks” here we could see them as thick as Grass we fired Volley after Volley into them and could see them drop almost on top another many of them retreatet to the church their we made charge on the church here it was where Jack Landis was allmost Killed instandly all he said was “well Boys I guess they got me” he was taken back with the wounded after taken the church and the Blockhouse it was getting dark and we where asigned to our Quaters for the night in a kind of Skirmish line all the Rebels had made for the Woods and everything was quiet for the Night in making the charge to the church I was the 5th men entering the same and the 5th entering the Blockhouse taps where sounded at 8 o Clock and we had a Number of Outpost and Patrol out all Night the nesct morning Febr 6 the Weather was fine but the Night had been very cold all of us where chivering all Night having nothing but a Poncho to cover with all the Boys started out to Hunt some chicken wich where plentiful in our nayborhood also the brought in 3 Sheep 2 Hogs 1 Buffalo Calf and 2 Beeves I killed them all and strung them to a tree one Beef we gave to the Kansas Boys who hadnt any and one Leg of Veal and a fresh Ham we send to the Colonel several Details where send out to bring the dead Rebels wich where about 45 in our nayborhood each Regiment buring their own so we buried all what was on the Hill 1 Officer and 17 Privates where put in our Grave and the rest whereever they had fallen this was a mean Job as most of them where already decaying and had partly being eaten up by the Dogs we now established a Cookhouse and fired up our Quarters

The weather was fine all night and we patrolled the city. At 8 o’clock we ate breakfast of sheet bread and coffee. At 10 o’clock forty of the company filled their haversacks with ammunition (300 per man) and carried the same to the front. All returned but four or five. I stayed myself with the Colonel’s permission. I laid alongside of the right to H Company. I kept 100 rounds myself. We continued heavy fire on the enemy which was stationed all along the lines but the strongest fort they had was in the Filipino hospital. But the Utah Battery soon put shell after shell into it and a few minutes later we made a charge. All boys along the line cheered as we advanced continuing to fire as we went. This made them run in all directions. Most of them fled to the Chinese hospital about 1/2 mile further back. Here we laid down flat in the rice field but they were now a good deal too much for us. They just poured their lead into us but in a short time C Company arrived. I now retreated to my company and laid between Charlie Playford and Milbert Johnson. We laid down here for a full 1.2 hour but firing was almost impossible for us. Seeing that we couldn’t stand their fire, we crept on hands and feet to the right which was a hillside on which was a Chinese cemetery with thousands of tombstones for breastworks. But, it had a strong wire fence around it which made it hard to cross with our guns and ammunition. Here two of our company were wounded and a few minutes later Major [Everhart] Bierer was hit with a brass bullet through the left shoulder and arm. The two men were Carl DeBolt and George Rockwell. Both were also hit with brass bullets through their shoulders. They were hurriedly carried back by our men. Here we opened up on them for about two hours. The Rebels were putting up a stubborn fight but after a couple hours work of the battery we again made a desperate fight and the rebels soon had to flee from there. Many of them were killed. Now we (the 10th) crept over to the right while the South Dakota men took charge of the hospital. We now entered a Filipino cemetery. Here the sharpshooters of the rebels which were all around us, in front of us in trees and bushes. [They] did some good work and wounded a good many of our men but not too dangerous. We opened up on them after finding some safe place but soon most of us were out of ammunition. It was in hand in short time. Then the bugle sounded for a charge. In front of us on the hill was a large church with a strong ten-foot wall around it and right in the rear of it was a blockhouse. About 200 yards in front of the church and to the right was a little village containing about 50 small “shacks.” Here we could see them as thick as grass. We fired volley after volley into them and could see them drop almost one on top another. Many of them retreated to the church. There we made a charge on the church. Here it was where Jake Landis was almost killed instantly. All he said was “well boys, I guess they got me.” He was taken back with the wounded. After taking the church and the blockhouse it was getting dark and we were assigned to our quarters for the night in a kind of skirmish line. All the rebels had made for the woods and everything was quiet for the night. In making the charge on the church I was the fifth man entering the same and the fifth man entering the blockhouse. Taps was sounded at 8 o’clock and we had a number of outposts and patrols out all night. The next morning, February 6th, the weather was fine but the night had been very cold. All of us were shivering all night having nothing but a poncho to cover with. All the boys started out to hunt some chickens which were plentiful in our neighborhood. Also they brought three sheep, two hogs, a buffalo calf and two cattle. I killed them all and strung them to a tree. One beef we gave to the Kansas boys who hadn’t any and one leg of veal and a fresh ham we sent to the Colonel. Several details were sent out to bury the dead rebels which were about 45 in our neighborhood. Each regiment burying their own. So, we buried all that was on the hill: one officer and 17 privates were put in our grave and the rest wherever they had fallen. This was a mean job as most of them were already decaying and had been partly eaten up by the dogs. We now established a cookhouse and fired up our quarters.

Wednesday, December 28th, 1898

This is a beautifull day Co D is on Outpost duty all papers have Rumors of expecting Trouble and the Comanders have Orders to keep all these in or near the Quarters in the Evening there is a fire in our Nayborhood and 2 Houses burned down we had fresh Meat this day Joe Johnson Milbert Johnson D Twist McMasters and 9 more wich are on light duty are on the Sick Book

This is a beautiful day. Company D is on outpost duty. All the papers have rumors of expecting trouble and the commanders have orders to keep all these in or near the quarters. In the evening there is a fire in our neighborhood and two houses burned down. We had fresh meat this day. Joe Johnson, Milbert Johnson, David Twist, McMasters and nine more on light duty are on the sick book.

Saturday, December 24th, 1898

The Weather is delightfull and we all recieved Mail and good many of the Men some smal Boxes Mail leaves in the afternon by Hong Kong the Company is going trough regular routine of Buisnes I mailed 3 letter and some papers but this did not leave as exspected I am feeling pretty good now but am still of duty in the Evening I went over to the prison where I found all prisoner enjoying themself every thing is iluminated and decorated verry tastefully the South Dacota Band furnishes some fine Musick the Prisoner also had a fine xmas Souper also the City is partly iluminated and Fire Works seems to be the best enjoyment of the Natives Hagen Asendorf McMasters Milbert Johnson Joe are on the Sick Book and of duty and 8 more on light duty total 13 men (fresh Mear recieved)

The weather is delightful and we all received mail and a good many of the men received some small boxes. Mail leaves in the afternoon via Hong Kong. The company is going through its regular routine of business. I mailed three letters and some papers but the mail did not leave as expected. I am feeling pretty now but am still off duty. In the evening I went over to the prison where I found all the prisoners enjoying themselves. Everything is illuminated and decorated very tastefully. The South Dakota band furnished some fine music. The prisoners also had a fine Christmas supper. Also, the city is partly illuminated and fireworks seem to be the best enjoyment of the natives. [Samuel] Hagan, [John] Asendorf, McMasters, Milbert and Joe Johnson are on the sick book and off duty. Eight more men are on light duty for a total of thirteen. (Fresh meat received)

Wednesday, October 19th, 1898

This is a beautifull day there is a nice breese going we are getting the good News that Mail has come in by the way of Hong Kong wich we recieved in the afternoon wich made every body happy I recieved 4 letters and a picture of my Girl this Mail was 19 days old we also had a goodly Number of Newspaper sent up to this time the Amerilan are printing 4 different Newspaper call the Freedom Amerikan Soldier Manila Times and Unkle Sam they are all selling at 10ct a paper I send one of each of them home we had fresh Meat to day Christopher Twist Johnson Miller McMaster Hagen Frankenbery Daugherty and Georg Conn and Knott are on the sick List

This is a beautiful day. There is a nice breeze going. We are getting good news that mail has come in by way of Hong Kong which we received in the afternoon. This made everybody happy. I received four letters and a picture of my girl. This mail was nineteen days old. We also had a goodly number of newspapers sent up to [us] this time. The Americans are printing four different newspapers: the Freedom, American Soldier, Manila Times and Uncle Sam. They are all selling at ten cents a paper. I sent one of each of them home. We had fresh meat today. [Frank] Christopher, [David] Twist, [Milbert] Johnson, [George] Miller, [Albert] McMaster, [Samuel] Hagan, [Joseph] Frankenberry, [Homer] Daugherty and George Conn and [George] Knotts are on the sick list.

Tuesday, October 18th, 1898

It is still raignen but it is clearing of in the afternon nicely we can hear Dewy firing a Salute in the Morning and one in the Evening but do not Know what Ships came in we are doing Guard duty just on our Street but have Guard Mount at Headquarters Knotts Christopher Twist Johnson Miller McMaster Hagen Frankenbery Daugherty and Georg Conn are on the Sick List

It is still raining but it cleared up in the afternoon nicely. We can hear Dewey firing a salute in the morning and one in the evening but we do not know what ships came in. We are doing guard duty just on our street but have guard mount at headquarters. [George] Knotts, [Frank] Christopher, [David] Twist, [Milbert] Johnson, [George] Miller, [Albert] McMaster, [Samuel] Hagan, [Joseph] Frankenberry, [Homer] Daugherty and George Conn are on the sick list.

Monday, October 17th, 1898

It has raigned all Night and the most part of the day we are having Inspection in afternon and have Dressparade at 5 pm we had some nice fresh Meat to day there are many Rumors afloat about us going home but we all got pretty used to them Knotts Christopher Twist Johnson Miller McMaster Hagen Frankenbery Daugherty and Georg Conn are on the Sick List

It has rained all night and the most part of the day. We are having inspection in the afternoon and have dress parade at 5 p.m. We had some nice, fresh meat today. There are many rumors afloat about us going home, but we all got pretty used to them. [George] Knotts, [Frank] Christopher, [David] Twist, [Milbert] Johnson, [George] Miller, [Albert] McMaster, [Samuel] Hagan, [Joseph] Frankenberry, [Homer] Daugherty and George Conn are on the sick list.

Sunday, October 16th, 1898

It has raigned the biggest part of the day I was on Guard all Night at the Jail we where relieved at 8 am by the South Dacota Regt wich we understand will have charge over the prisons after this we still have to do without Meat as we cannot get at the Boat we have Beans for Dinner and Rice for Supper and most of the Boys eat at the Restaurant up town we have no dressparade 7 of our Men are doing Guard duty on the Streets in the Evening we all attended Service at the Opera House wich we all enjoyed after Service we had some time Musik rendered by the Colerado Band the House was full this time Spaniard as well as the Native had Invatation Christopher Twist Miller Knotts Daugherty Georg Conn Milbert Johnson and Alb McMaster are on the sick List

It has rained the biggest part of the day. I was on guard all night at the jail. We were relieved at 8 a.m. by the South Dakota Regiment which we understand will have charge over the prisons after this. We still do without meat as we cannot get at the boat. We have beans for dinner and rice for supper and most of the boys eat at the restaurants uptown. We have no dress parade. Seven of our men are doing guard duty on the streets. In the evening we all attended services at the Opera House which we all enjoyed. After the service we had some music rendered by the Colorado Band. The house was full; the Spaniards as well as the native [Filipinos] had [an] invitation [to attend]. [Frank] Christopher, [David] Twist, [George] Miller, [George] Knotts, [Homer] Daugherty, George Conn, Milbert Johnson and Alb[ert] McMaster are on the sick list.

Saturday, October 15th, 1898

It is still raignen all day and it is quiet chilly Co C is doing Guard duty at the prisons the Bay is overcrauded with Ships and the Water is so rough that we could not get the Meat of the Boat today we have a new blue Blouse and Leggins issued and some Campagn Hats we have 3 amerikan Newspaper printed now “the Amerikan Soldier” about 5 weeks old “the Manila Times” 2 weeks old and the “Freedom” just out for the first time Twist Knotts Miller Daugherty Johnson and Georg Conn and McMaster are on the sick List

It is still raining all day and it is quite chilly. Company C is doing guard duty at the prisons. The bay is overcrowded with ships and the water is so rough that we could not get the meat off the boat. Today we have a new blue blouse and leggings issued and some campaign hats. We have three American newspapers printed now: “The American Soldier,” about five weeks old; “The Manila Times,” two weeks old; and the “Freedom,” just out for the first time. [David] Twist, [George] Knotts, [George] Miller, [Homer] Daugherty, [Milbert] Johnson and George Conn are on the sick list.

Friday, October 14th, 1898

It is still raignen all day we have our Hour Bayonett Exercises in the Morning and dressparade in the Evening this day was a great Feast day for the Natives in the Evening the whole City was illuminated I was also in the Cathreal in the Evening watching their strange Way of Worship this day we recieved another white Duck Shirt and 2 Gingham Shirts Christopher Twist Knotts Miller Daugherty Georg Conn and Milbert Johnson are on the Sick List

It is still raining all day. We have our hour bayonet exercises in the morning and dressparade in the evening. This day was a great feast day for the natives. In the evening the whole city was illuminated. I was also in the Cathedral in the evening watching the strange way of worship. This day we received another white duck shirt and two gingham shirts. [Frank] Christopher, [David] Twist, [George] Knotts, [George] Miller, [Homer] Daugherty, George Conn and Milbert Johnson are on the sick list.