Thursday, February 5, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 70 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 71 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 72

 

PAGE 68

Office of the President

of the Philippines

Malacañang

Thursday

February 5, 1970

10:20 PM

Called Ambassador Byroade to find out if they (the Americans) are supporting me in the fight against the subversives. He said they would. Whatever they have done to encourage intransigence among the Liberals, we should neutralize them before a total confrontation with the communists. To satisfy the American ego I asked for the accelerated delivery of the helicopters and some ammunition for both training and combat.

My principal worry, however, is the effect of the IMF program of a free rate of exchange. This will cause further increase in prices beyond the reach of the common man. My barber, Conrad, tells me that money is becoming scarce.

Byroade handed me his letter informing me that Pres. Nixon would like to receive me in California in mid or late August. I have accepted the invitation but I have delayed the publicity. This may cause another demonstration.

Asked Rep. Salipada Pendatun to keep peace in Cotabato and put some sense into the Liberals.

We are now preparing for the military confrontation with communism. Legal studies on whether an arrest can be made without warrant if I suspend the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus and if the arresting officer can be charged for illegal detention when the writ is restored. Then an assessment of the evidence against the target personalities.

We must prepare for a legal fight.

ATTACHMENT 

Letter of Ambassador Byroade (Page 1 of 2)

Manila, Philippines

February 3, 1970

Dear Mr. President:

You will undoubtedly recall that in your recent discussion with Vice President Agnew, the latter extended President Nixon’s invitation for you to pay a visit to the United States and suggested late 1970 or early 1971. During that conversation mention was made of the fact that many Heads of States would be going to America for the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Session of the United [Nations]. The Vice President later pointed out to you his thought that this would hardly be good timing from our point of view as with so many visitors it might be difficult to give your own visit the priority and attention that he knew President Nixon would desire. I believe, but am not certain, that Vice President Agnew suggested that a later date might be preferable.

I now have the authority to explore with you the possibility of a somewhat earlier date of mid or late August. If such timing would prove convenient to you, I am informed that President Nixon would like to receive you in California as he has found that that locale has proven ideal for comparable state occasions. I have been informed also that he would like a Pacific coast setting

 

His Excellency

Ferdinand E. Marcos

President of the Republic

of the Philippines

 

ATTACHMENT 

Letter of Ambassador Byroade (Page 2 of 2)

for the actual meeting with you as he feels this would lend emphasis to the mutual interests of our two countries in the Pacific community.

I will be most pleased, of course, to pass along your thoughts on this matter.

Sincerely,

(Sgd.) Henry A. Byroade

January 4, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1101 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1201 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1301 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 1401 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 15

PAGE 9

Malacañang

Manila

January 4, 1970

Ex-Pres. Macapagal who is visiting in Singapore says that he is shocked by the news that there is supposed to be a secret agreement for the Sabah claim to be relinquished by the Philippines after the resumption of diplomatic relations.

There is no such agreement. I used Mr. Moon Park and Mr. Chang Ming Thieu as emissaries to Prime Minister Tungku Abdul Rahman and Deputy Prime Minister Tun Abdul Ragak so that they would agree to the resumption of diplomatic relations. The Tungku had insisted on such relinquishment of the claim and a recognition formally of the sovereignty of Malaysia over Sabah, but I refused and they formally agreed that after diplomatic relations our two peoples should get used to each other travelling in our respective countries before we spoke of these matters. The Filipinos should now go to Sabah and invest there.

VP Agnew in Thailand and Taipeh has said that I asked him whether America was slowly withdrawing from Asia and he had answered in the negative. I asked Pres. Nixon the same thing. He was more vague, although when he reached the U.S. he did say what Agnew is saying now.

What I want to know is what bases they are going to keep in Asia and what troops where, and under what arrangements

Agnew is quoted as saying he had told me that he had made me understand and that he told me

PAGE 10

Malacañang

Manila

that, of course, the number and location would change with the need.

He told me nothing of the kind.

On the last day of his stay here, Jan. 1st, when I talked to him about the U.S. helping us on our present balance of payments problem, he was evasive. I did not press the point.

Either he has no power to commit the U.S. or he is still feeling his way around.

During the conference at 11:30 AM if Dec. 31st when I met all the special envoys of 44 governments who attended my inauguration, the only matter on which there was some vestige of promise of help was on studies of typhoons and their control. Amb. Byroade is supposed to follow this up.

I impressed on VP Agnew that we in Asia could not make any plans on our security if we did not know their plans but that however even in such state of ignorance we in the Philippines are moving to prepare to defend ourselves on our own.

He invited me to come to the U.S. after September 1970 – preferably not while the other heads of state are in the U.S. on the UN anniversary. I made no commitment on the exact date but did promise to go.

PAGE 11

Malacañang

Manila

Pres. Nixon and VP Agnew strike me as very evasive about helping the Philippines now although they are supporting us in the IMF and IBRD in our efforts to get dollar loans.

I am skeptical about the wisdom of a trip to the U.S.

I have told Sec. Romulo repeatedly that there should be no further talks of the U.S. military bases in the Phil and our wish to remove them as we will use this as the “ultimate weapon” in the trading that may be needed to obtain recognition of our special preferences in the American market. For if our quota on sugar is not extended by the Sugar Act’s extension this year or by treaty in the replacement of the Laurel-Langley agreement, then the sugar industry is wrecked and our economy may be disastrously affected.

So I have told VP Agnew that before the formal negotiations on trade and security start we should have an understanding as to what terms such negotiations would arrive at. I said that I would like Amb. Byroade to be able to sit down with me on this.

PAGE 12

Malacañang

Manila

Rod Reyes, editor of the Manila Chronicle, has just told Kits Tatad that they are planning to serialize the libelous book of Chit Navarro on Imelda.

We have to watch the Lopezes and Montelibano. They are still sore for my veto of their franchise to operate a telephone and telecommunications company anywhere in the Philippines and the NuVue – a cable television company that would select programs from any of the television companies (without permission from the latter) to be flashed to their subscribers by cable. Both were illegal and unconstitutional but they took offense at the veto.

They are the worst oligarchs in the country.

I must stop them from using the government for their own purposes.

Piding Montelibano is working on the reclamation project of Republic Real Estate – pending adjudication in the courts.

Iñing Lopez strongly urged that I appoint Piding as Secretary of Finance, as if the position were vacant. This was a repetition of the recommendation in 1965.

 

PAGE 13

Malacañang

Manila

Peace and order must be immediately attended to.

I must work out the programs for exports and tourism.

Then I must appoint the replacement of Gov. Calalang as Governor of the Central Bank. The IMF consultative group arrives in Jan. 10th.

There are more than 100 CFI vacancies, 7 Court of Appeals, one in the Supreme Court and another vacancy coming up in February.

The Armed Forces has too many hold-overs who should be retired.

We must change the strategy in Central Luzon against the Huks. We must restudy the use of civilians either as agents or informers.

There are three basic problems that I am personally attending to:

  1. Peace and Order
  2. Balance of Payments
  3. Land Reform

Exports and Tourism come under the 2nd and Central Luzon under the 1st.

January 2, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 5 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 6

Malacañang

Manila

January 2, 1970

Mrs. Agnew left this morning to join VP Agnew at Taipeh. Meldy had breakfast with her – 7:30 – she was not awake so she (Meldy) waited for 8:30 AM.

Last Dec. 29, 1969 when I was playing golf two sausage twin-rotor navy (U.S.) helicopters for VP Agnew landed at the golf course and obstructed the whole fairway. When we asked that they move a little to the side so we could play through they did not bother but said we could go right ahead and hit the helicopters with our balls. Typical younger generation comment on this was Imee’s “Yabang na manga Cano –”.

Ordered protection for the nine teachers of Batanes testifying about terrorism, a public hearing on the Nawasa rates hike, Com. Vera (BIR) to study a year’s amnesty for untaxed incomes voluntarily disclosed. In Ising’s party I asked Charlie Ledesma, President of the Sugar Planters to bring the planters to the palace on the 14th so I could convince them to pay the sacadas the minimum wage. Also ordered Gen. Yan to implement my original order to retrain the special forces and use them in Central Luzon as a unit.

The children and Meldy had a crying bee on their not attending the Ising party (after lunch) at the dining table ending in our bedroom where we had a frank grievance session, by the way –

Ka Erding’s Party at 8:30 PM after golf with Amante Begoriva and Amang Sabak. The announcement of the

Iglesia support had certainly helped turn the tide but there are doubts as to whether they actually helped at the last minute or just kept neutral. They actually were a sly and cunning lot.

January 1, 1970

01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 3 01 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos, 1970, 0001-0099 (Jan01-Feb28) 4 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos - Loose Pages and Attachments (1970) 1 Diary of Ferdinand Marcos - Loose Pages and Attachments (1970) 2

Malacañang

Manila

January 1, 1969 1970

I start a daily written record of my second term in office as President. This will be kept in loose-leaf so that all kinds of materials may be attached to the binder. Thus the background should be a treatise on the elections of 1969. This will be composed of my critique as well as the commentaries on the technique of victory.

New Year – Left Ising’s Party for VP Agnew and the Foreign Ministers at 11:00 PM so that we could welcome New Year with the children. They were trying out the Bocaue sparklers at the garden and fountain in front of the main gate. Hope we did not break Ising’s party as VP and Mrs. Agnew followed us home and he tried a few sparklers himself before he went to bed.

Mass at 12:40 – Sleep at 1:30 AM. Woke up at 7:00; back to bed to wake up and talk to VP and Mrs. Agnew up to 9:00 AM. 

PAGE 2

Yesterday I finally transferred all of my worldly possessions to the Filipino people through the Ferdinand E. Marcos Foundation. I have been planning this for many years but I felt that the beginning of my second term was the most propitious time. This was a decision arrived at after a long deliberation and was not the result of pique, anger, despair or emotion – Nor is it due to a sense of guilt because some the funds come from the Yamashita treasure – Nor is it just a political stunt. I have no further political plans.

And it seems a burden has been lifted from my shoulders.

The surprising thing is that the reaction of the people seem to be of no consequence to me. It was a noble act waiting to be done. I feel I am above all the pettiness of men and I look down on them with some contempt but with a counterbalance of understanding.

(ATTACHMENT)

STATEMENT OF PRESIDENT FERDINAND MARCOS ON DISPOSITION OF HIS WORLDY GOODS THROUGH THE MARCOS FOUNDATION

DECEMBER 31, 1969

(PAGE 1 OF 2)

DECEMBER 31, 1969

DRAFT

I have today given away by general instrument of transfer all my worldly possessions to the Filipino people through a foundation to be organized known as the Marcos Foundation.

Moved by the strongest desire and the purest will to set the example of self-denial and self-sacrifice for all our people, I have today decided to give away all my worldly possessions so that they may serve the greater needs of the greater number of our people.

It is my wish that these properties will be used in advancing education, science, technology and the arts.

This act I undertake of my own free will, knowing that my need of material possessions will, having always been a simple man, my needs will always be lesser that those of many of our people, who have given me the highest honor within their gift, an honor unshared by any one of my predecessors and not likely to be shared by any one else in the future no other Filipino leader.

Since about a year ago, I have asked my closest some of very my closest confidants to study the mechanics of this decision. Today studies have been completed, and a foundation will be formed to administer these properties and all funds that may be generated therefrom.

My wife, Imelda, is in agreement with this decision. Provisions will be made for my children, so that they shall be assured of satisfactory education and be prepared to meet their lifetime duties and endeavors.

For the moment, my most sincere hope is that this

(PAGE 2 OF 2) 

humble act shall set the example and move to greater deeds of unselfishness and compassion, many of our countrymen whose position in society gives them a stronger duty to minister to the needs of our less fortunate brothers and countrymen.

PFM