November 9, 1944

We overheard Skerl and the doctors discussing the hens and the decreasing eggs. Now that camp does not peel the camotes [it] means that the hens get no skins to eat, so that there is almost no food for them, the sow or the piglets. Dr. Mather says, “Well, shall be go back to giving them the peelings?” and Skerl …

October 25, 1944

I can see that Jerry too has traveled a long journey in here through books, deep experience and mental turbulence. In agonizing worry over the children and me during the last two months of hunger, decline and desperate illness, he has touched some unfathomable moments. He shows change and growth too, and has plumbed some universal feelings as I have. …

Oct. 11, 1944

Jerry earns camotes which help the family meals. He seems to like the garden and has his second wind like Bedie. I have mine and wish June would get hers. I sat up reading pages of my toilet paper — Women in Love. There are many pages of majestic writing. Internally I feel normal for the first time since February. My …

June 12, 1944

Jerry talked to Dr. Mather and they discussed feeding me  Red Cross meat, with liver shots. If I eat so much of the canned meat, Dr. Mather asked how about the rest of the family if the pinch finally comes and Jerry replied that we would just have to take a chance. He said Pete needs to get that blood …

May 12, 1944

Camp pictures—the wood crew walking in after lunch in all kinds of caps and clothes, battered and patched, torn and dusty, motley but picturesque; Dr. Mather and Johnson carrying goat garbage can between them on shoulder pole. The bank-side shacks are so amusing, with roofs of canvas, cogon grass, rusty tin or woven branches. Some are very disheveled, awry, rakish …