December 10, 1944

With best wishes and a warm sendoff, early that day, we sailed on our last leg to General MacArthur's GHQ and to freedom. We were assured that there were no Japs on any of the many islands that cluster the northern tip of Leyte. The weather was fine. Wind just right. We sailed with joy..

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December 9, 1944

Shortly before noon, we again re-embarked with the warning to avoid a place called Limbajon along the Masbate coast, where a week before, a huge force of fully-equipped Japs was forced to land after their transport was beached as a result of bombing by American planes. What promised to be a good sunny day ended..

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December 8, 1944

Very early that morning we put off to sea after some delay and after repeated persuasions to stay because the invasion of Masbate was anticipated any time. Somewhere along the coast, we sailed by a batel at anchor. The sails were rent. There were signs of disturbance on board. But no one was visible! A..

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December 6, 1944

Today, very early in the morning, we dropped anchor at an isolated cove of Burias where we saw another sailboat anchored, to make inquiries. We asked if there were Japs in Masbate. We were assured there was not a Jap on the island, not even in the capital. With this encouraging information, we weighed anchor,..

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December 5, 1944

A very calm day, so calm, we barely moved. Marinduque was still in sight. The heat was scorching us. I opened the portfolio I carried, took out its contents of maps and reports and placed them inside a big round bamboo tube, a foot and a half long, which I closed and sealed with wax...

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December 4, 1944

The sailboat was ready. It was the sleekest thing on water. Twenty-seven feet long, it measured a mere 28 inches wide. It was picked for its speed. Five men were to be its crew, plus Lt. Richard Jopida, an expert seaman who volunteered to land us at Leyte. At night, the moon peeped over the..

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December 3, 1944

The work on the sailboat was being hurried, it was expected to be ready by dark. As I watched the men work the sails, my father approached. Pointing to a man nearby, he told me the man wanted to go with us to Leyte. He asked me what I had to say. I took a good..

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December 2, 1944

Instead of twiddling our thumbs a full day, my father decided to look over Balanacan harbor to be able to render a more complete report on the air-naval battle we witnessed there exactly a week before. Balanacan is near Argao so we were there in half an hour of paddling. Evidence of the recent air-naval..

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