Late in January, 1945

They are advising us to get out. Our wall is high and the top is covered with bits of glass in the cement, but the soldiers climbed it today. Janson has some sort of paper from the Japanese ambassador saying he is a neutral and in charge of several neutral countries. He flourished this and..

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January 23, 1945

". . . and Sheridan only twenty miles away." So runs the old poem. If we had a poet in our midst, we might do a poem, somewhat like this: With detonations far and wide They dynamite the countryside. We rush to look, return to shiver, As our houses quake and quiver! Shooting, looting little..

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January 9, 1945

The Great Day, our Great Day! The troops have landed on Luzon, at Lingayan Bay. That’s just where the Japs landed. I had my money on Mindanao, or did have until they made that landing in Mindoro. But they are here, not two hundred miles away. Oh happy day! At this moment, I can see..

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November 24, 1944

A strange world we live in! The most welcome sound is the smooth and easy drone of our own planes, the most eagerly awaited sight the silver of those planes flashing toward us in the early morning sunshine. I wish, though, they’d wait until I get London B.B.C, and a second cup of coffee, but..

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September 25, 1944

We are somewhat disappointed. No raids since the 22nd, although many alarms were sounded. Current is on again, and we hear the local radio announced the proclamation of a state of war between the “Philippine Republic and the United States!” The Japanese radio calls is a declaration of war “on the United States and Great..

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September 22, 1944

We got off to an early start—no gas, no electricity, no telephone; but we have charcoal. The air siren sounded this morning before we got coffee but the cook finished it during the raid, scared as he was. To see those planes approaching, more than forty of them that I could see, was a magnificent..

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September 21, 1944

This day, so long expected, Manila was bombed. From practically orchestra seats in my house between two airfields, in a street lined with gasoline dumps, trucks, barracks, I could expect almost anything. But a most workmanlike job the whole performance was indeed. For two or three days our “protectors,” as the Nips call themselves, have..

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August 4, 1944

I went to Santo Tomas yesterday with Dorothy’s pass for renewal. Saw old Mrs. G. who looks so ill. Her husband is still in Fort Santiago. The Japs renewed her pass without question. I had to wait at the entrance gate while the guard took my case up to the ofice. I dropped a note..

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July 27, 1944

A highly exciting week? What with His Nibs (did I mean Hitler?) reported dead, the high mortality among Jap generals, rumors flying about with the greatest of ease, and the bay so full of ships I can’t count them, we are all of a tiz. Took a little ride on the boulevard on the bike..

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