6th of October, 1762

Sixth. At four o'clock in the morning we filed off from our quarters, in small bodies, to give the less suspicion; and, by degrees, assembled at St. Jago's church ; observing the utmost silence, and concealing ourselves in the place of arms, and the parallel between the church and the battery. Maj. Barker kept up..

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5th of October, 1762

Fifth. Maj. Barker's fire was so violent, that the breach appeared practicable. Our cannon from the three-gun battery silenced those of the enemy on the  orillon of St. Andrew. We were in hopes that the Spaniards would be sensible of their danger, and think of giving up the town. But they were obstinate, without bravery, or..

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4th of October, 1762

Fourth. About three hours before day one thousand of the Indians attacked the cantonment of the seamen. They were encouraged to this attempt by the incessant rains in which they flattered themselves our fire-arms would be useless. Their approach was favoured by a great number of thick bushes that grew upon the side of a..

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3rd of October, 1762

Third. The weather became moderate. At daylight the battery was opened against the left face of the bastion of St. Diego, towards the saliant angle. One hundred seamen were appointed to assist the corps of artillery in this service. Our cannon, by the most excellent skill and management of Maj. Barker, and the officers under..

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October 1st and 2nd, 1762

October first and second. The weather grew so very tempestuous, that the whole squadron was in danger, and all communication with it entirely cut off. The violence of the storm forced the South-sea castle storeship (which was lately arrived) from her anchors, and drove her on shore: even in this situation the ship was of..

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30th of September, 1762

Thirtieth. The engineers traced out Adm. Cornish's battery for eight twenty-four pounders, on the left of St. Jago's church; but the violence of the rains retarded our progress; and the absence of two ships, that had on board a considerable quantity of fascines, and many of our working and intrenching tools, put us to some inconveniences...

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29th of September, 1762

Twenty-ninth. The Admiral, at my request, ordered the Elizabeth, Com. Tyddyman, and the Falmouth, Capt. Brereton, to place themselves as near the town as the depth of water would permit, and second our operations, by enfilading the front we intended to attack; but the shallows kept them at too great a distance to answer the..

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28th of September, 1762

Twenty-eighth. The Governor's nephew was landed. My secretary, Lieut. Fryar, was ordered to conduct him into the town with a flag of truce. In the mean time, a large party of the garrison, intermixed with Indians, sallied out to attack our second post, N** 2. by which Lieut. Fryar was advancing to the ravelin-gate. The..

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27th of September, 1762

Twenty-seventh. The Governor sent out a flag of truce, to apologize for some barbarities committed by the savages lately mentioned, who had murdered some straggling seamen; and to request, that a nephew of his, taken in the bay, might be sent on shore. This gentleman had been dispatched from the Philippina galleon, just arrived on the..

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