November 12, 1944

The Committee ruled that camote water is community property and can no longer be boiled down into syrup exclusively for the kitchen staff. Jerry says it is an important point that the garbage from the guardhouse kitchen for forty guards has fattened their sow and six piglets, while the leftovers from garbage of 460 internces..

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November 11, 1944

Armistice Day, but a mockery a now. There was heavy fog which cleared suddenly and revealed glorious blue sky with soft clouds, golden sun, air as heady as wine, the mountains unmoved by all the beating of elements—etched sharp and clear in blue line against the sky, terraces washed clean showing green sprouts still growing,..

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November 10, 1944

Bedie came down full of tales and eager to hear more. We patients read in bed with hot bricks. Others were busy toiling, mopping up pail after pailful of water, scooping up dustpansful of water. Hot soup at 10 was most welcome, and big boiled camotes with camote stew and boiled cabbage tasted marvelous at..

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November 9, 1944

We overheard Skerl and the doctors discussing the hens and the decreasing eggs. Now that camp does not peel the camotes [it] means that the hens get no skins to eat, so that there is almost no food for them, the sow or the piglets. Dr. Mather says, "Well, shall be go back to giving..

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November 8, 1944

We hear that a limit of | pound each of peanuts has been imposed so that patients or healthy camp members cannot corner the market. Everyone is seen with bunches of onions given out by camp. They are fresh green bouquets tucked under arms. Jerry is so strained that he cannot bear an interruption—his voice..

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November 7, 1944

I shall never be able to express how | have widened my mind and horizon in the confinement of this prison camp, not only through the beauty of the mountain range and cloud-filled valley; from deep personal experiences; but also from contact with an infinite variety of people, their troubles, problems and casual stories from..

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November 5, 1944

Jerry and Charles and I talked of Oura’s bellowing rampage at roll call, making Kaito lose face. It goes back to yesterday when Yamato told Carl he wasn’t doing roll call right—he was walking too far ahead of Yamato which was an insult. Carl asked him how he wanted it done and they talked around..

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November 4, 1944

Local rumor—the guards get no more Tribune and civilians can make only special permit trips to town after today. Also the guardhouse radio has been ripped out and taken to town forever. The news must be good, the rumors true. Sylvia’s garden seat, the rustic arbor and all other seats were torn up for firewood..

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November 3, 1944

The guards turned out to a ceremony or drill on the road, guided by bellows from Sakashita. Then they went out the gate at various paces until finally they were into the goose step, which is always incongruous when transferred from Germans to Japanese. Several outside families waited at the gate with bags of food..

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