May 1, 1936

(Labor Day). Manila quiet; but there are pictures in the press of policemen trying on gas masks, which would naturally work for quiet! I saw a group of police with riot guns in front of the Post Office. Malacañan is deserted; Quezon manages to spend only one day at a time there sandwiched in between his voyages.

Out with Lapointe to visit Geo. Logan in the Spanish Hospital at San Pedro Makati. This is the most modern (3 years old) and apparently the best managed hospital in Manila, and it is run by the Spanish community. Then went to the Manila Hotel to say good-bye to “Andy” Anderson who is going (reluctantly) home on leave. Then to Tommy Wolff’s house where his 28th annual picnic for employes of the Sanitary Steam Laundry Co. was held on the lawn. Julius Rees back from United States, says conditions are improving there–he believes Roosevelt is sure of re-election. Rees approves the adoption of a new United States tax on the undivided profits of corporations. Talked with the United States Shipping Board man: in my day there were 30,000 tons a month shipped out of the Philippines–now nearly 10 times as much. Hence the great show of ships. He said that when independence comes, only the hemp industry could survive–sugar cannot compete with Java. Rees is however, also very pessimistic as to the future of the United States.

Lapointe tells me that in all the years he has spent in the Philippines, he has never known a Filipino to repay money borrowed!

Should have gone this noon to the German Club for their National Day–and was even anxious to do so, though no doubt, some of their older members were among those whom I deported to the United States detention camps during the war–but I could not stomach the thought of drinking Hitler’s health! Believe I should have vomited!

April 30, 1936

Called at Dr. Sison’s. I must go completely on the waterwagon. Went to the Bureau of Science–then to Malacañan where I talked for half an hour with Dawson (from Shanghai) of the United States Department of Agriculture. He has been here for some weeks studying the agricultural situation: says the Filipinos are the most “agriculturally minded” people he has ever known, and that many alert minds are busy on the problem of diversification of crops. Dawson reports the tobacco crops in the Cagayan valley are almost a failure from drought.

Saw Hartendorp and had a telephone from Dosser in Baguio. Tried to help out troubles for both.

Paulino Santos has been appointed Chief of Staff of the Army and a Major General–best man possible, and he will still be allowed to carry on as Director of Prisons–this will take him from Malacañan. Reyes also is made a Major General and Provost Marshal, Dr. Valdes a Major General, Vicente Lim also a General–all good selections.

Talked with Lapointe who has just come up from Antimonan where he is building a nipa shack in his coconut grove.

Went to the Aquarium which seems rather neglected. Called on Jim Ross to get his opinion concerning Americans becoming Philippine citizens. He agreed with Dewitt that this act does not impair American citizenship.

February 14, 1936

Quezon appoints the National Economic Council and Government Survey Board; both have been held up for more than two months while Roxas was coyly weighing the advantages to himself in accepting or declining this work. Quezon told me only two days ago that he had abandoned the idea of the government survey board for lack of time to complete its work before the Assembly meets in June; that he wanted me to do the work superficially of course, but to give him something to show the Assembly. Yesterday when talking with Unson and Trinidad I suggested to them that they ask for a budgetary bureau to be set up within the framework provided by law for the Survey Board, and to be allowed to run on for a couple of years until they could finish the standardization, and all other technical reforms. Meanwhile, we could offer plans of consolidation and co-ordination of the different bureaus. Immediately after, they saw Quezon and I surmise the plan suggested by me went through, as they, with Paez are appointed as the new members of the Survey Board.

Talked with Hartendorp, publicity adviser; he has three plans:

(1)  To condense news of local papers for Quezon, under separate columns of approval and criticism

(2)  To post a one sheet Government “Gazette” with caricatures etc., selected from local papers, in every municipality and school in the Islands

(3)  To send one sheet of selected articles in local papers out to a list of American papers.

Talked with Lapointe about his recent trip to San Fernando, Union, to see the carnival there. He travelled 3d class in the railroad and is amusing but bitter in his criticism of the dirt and delays. Also says most of the passengers carry a revolver in the hip pocket. He mimics General Wood very well–also Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. whom he calls the “Play Boy” of the “Far East.”

Golf in p.m. at McKinley with Doria.

Talk with Palting, mail clerk in Malacañan; he lived eight years in New York, joined Tammany Hall and voted without being a citizen. Came back here at Quezon’s suggestion. Has valuable suggestions as to reorganization in the Post Office here.

General Holbrook arrives vice General Kilbourne.

November 28, 1935

Received from Secretary Quirino and Paez papers on the proposed purchase from the English of the 4% bonds of the Manila RR. Co. Two and one-half hours study of these.

Before dinner, went out to Sunset Beach near Cavite to swim with Geo. Logan (Lapointe, Trapp & Arnold). Lapointe says the rebellious Sakdalista movement will subside on the payment of higher wages and provision for more employment. That communist movement is more serious.