Friday, Oct. 21st, 1898

Manila, Luzon Island –Entry made in parlor of No. 2 Calle Santa Elena, Tondo. After cooking breakfast of fried bacon, corn meal mush & coffee & washing dishes, got the Filipino family to mend a pair of pants for me. Did this for nothing. I then called at the post office & visited several book stores. Bought a pamphlet re …

Sunday, August 14, 1898

Admiral Dewey informs the foreign battleships that they can anchor in their original positions in Manila Bay. The naval officers hastily go on land but the overly cautious Germans, heedless of the dispatches concerning the treaty, go ashore fully armed. On land or at sea, Admiral von Diederich’s presence reaffirms the dominance of a formidable Germany. It is said the …

Sunday, August 14, 1898

Surrender The American and Spanish officers have signed the treaty of surrender. When the Americans took over the government of Manila, they accorded the Spanish prisoners the honors of war. The terms of the surrender worth noting are as follows: Only the City of Manila and its environs are included in the terms of surrender. The sovereignty of the United …

Tuesday, August 9, 1898

The Refugees Today, at noon, the Americans will bombard Manila, unless it is a vain threat. For the past 24 hours, the ships anchored at bay have been taking aboard different groups of foreigners and Spanish civilians. English and German steamships are towing barges carrying all the refugees under their protection. The women and children being transported in rowboats are …

Sunday, August 7, 1898

Finally, this farce is reaching its conclusion. I am convinced that up to the last minute, each one will do his utmost to mislead the other. General Merritt and Admiral Dewey have released the United States’ ultimatum for Manila’s surrender. The Spaniards have been given 48 hours to reply. Admiral Dewey has informed the foreign squadrons of a likely American …

Friday, May 27, 1898

A Last Word on the Fight in Cavite The Spanish fleet did not remain in Subic since it could not secure any ground defense. I think Admiral Montojo ordered the fleet to return to Manila because he felt that there would be fewer losses if it were anchored in Cavite. This it accomplished on the 30th. Only five of the …

Monday, May 23, 1898

A considerable number of dispatches from America and Hongkong addressed to Admiral Dewey outrageously exalt him over and above Farragut and Nelson. It seems that these dispatches fell into the hands of Colonel Montojo, a gallant gentleman and also a good loser, who added his congratulations before transmitting them to the admiral. There seems to be a lack of seriousness …

Sunday, May 22, 1898

The Old Fogies Montojo is getting on in years, like the other Spanish generals and colonels who may be brave but lack vitality. Old age, aggravated by the climate, has reduced them to thinkers instead of strategists, unmoved either by victory or defeat. The proof is their poor defense of Manila, uselessly sacrificing their troops. Yes, Moltke was 70 years …

Monday, May 9, 1898

Vanquished I am fully aware of the problems in the minds of the Spaniards both in Manila and in Europe. They are searching high and low for the cause of their defeat except within themselves, the root of their problems. In the newspapers, the Americans are accused of demolishing Admiral Montojo’s fleet with their incendiary shells. “A pillar thick with …