June 27, 1945 Wednesday

A Colonel, Assistant Chief of the U.S. Military Police, came and inspected us today. He stopped in front of me and asked me two questions. "Are you comfortable here?", he asked. I somewhat hesitated before answering, "Yes, under the circumstances." What I really meant was that in view of the fact that we were prisoners,..

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June 26, 1945, Tuesday

It may be asked: If the conduct of the Japanese is as reported above why did we serve in the Japanese regime and later in the Philippine Republic? I had good reasons for not accepting any position in the Japanese regime. Aside from my past relations with America and the Americans, and the position I..

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June 22, 1945 Friday

Hope for our release is just like a stock market; it goes up and down. One day everybody appears happy; the next day, disappointment and deep sorrow reign. Today we are all in high spirits for a reason which I shall now explain. The urgent need for a separate toilet for the officer class has..

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June 11, 1945 Monday

Discussion is raging in the Camp as to what the government will do with regard to alleged collaborationists like us. To some, this question has been settled—Pres. Osmeña having already spoken. As reported in the Free Philippines of June 1, Pres. Osmeña declared that he reiterates his policy on collaborators as stated in his speech..

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June 9, 1945 Saturday

In the morning, we continued working cleaning the premises. In the afternoon, immediately after meals, the same Sergeant who supervised us in the morning came to order us to work. He was very rough, treating us like schoolchildren. We nevertheless were in good spirits and did what he said, dressing up hurriedly to go to..

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June 8, 1945 Friday

To our surprise, MacArthur came. When rumors were circulating that Gen. MacArthur was coming, I did not pay attention as I thought it was one of the many jokes daily being dished out to us by fun makers. But when the rumor persisted, I thought that perhaps MacArthur would come since the Americans were looking..

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June 1, 1945 Friday

We had a very unfortunate incident today. It provoked a crisis which we fear might threaten the peace and unity in the compound. To enforce better discipline, they decided to militarize our camp. When we reached the front of our buildings, we were lined up and given military orders. Some members, especially Assemblyman Zulueta and..

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May 31, 1945 Thursday

Today is a holy day of obligation, Corpus Christi, and we heard Mass. Upon our arrival from church, there were rumors that more detainees from Manila were coming. At 11 o'clock, an amphibian truck arrived with 35 persons. I could recognize only two—Dr. Gualberto, the Mayor of Rosario, Batangas and Mr. Aurelio Alvero, a young..

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May 24, 1945 Thursday

Last night, we received the memorandum order of May 15, 1945, providing for the classification of detainees. Therein we are called "limited assimilated prisoners of war". The order is issued in accordance with the Geneva Convention. We were detained probably pursuant to (g) paragraph 76 of the Rules of Land Warfare adopted to Geneva. According..

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