October 16, 1972

scan0035

1:00 AM Oct. 17th

Oct. 16, 1972

Monday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Worked on the establishment of new settlements for the squatters who will be displaced upon the destruction of their houses.

And the proclamation transferring ownership of the rice and corn lands to the tenants paying 25% of the average yield for 15 years –this payment shall include 6% interest.

Then met South Cotabato Gov. Morales, Cong. James Chiongbian and some mayors, the mayors of the two Lanaos led by the President of the mayors league of Lanao del Sur, Mayor Palauran Dusumimba who were accompanied by the Sec. of National Defense, the military and other leaders. I attach the list.

Met Gov. Camerino of Cavite, S.P. Lopez of the U.P. inducted underSec. Jose Drilon as the Under Sec. of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Received Datu Mafalen of the Ubos, Mai Juan of the T’boli, Datu M    of the H.

and the Moslems of Palawan

covered by TV.

In the afternoon I met the chiefs of Police (about 1,000) at 4:00 PM and explained the objectives of our cause.

Then met the Greater Manila mayors and chiefs of Police.

Saturday, September 30, 1972

I did not sleep well last night, not even in this other place where I am hiding and filling out my diary for today.

I anxiously sought out Edong Angara and requested him again to ask Enrile to scratch out my name. Edong replied that while the heat is on we might as well tide things over because in any case I have nothing to worry about. “We should wait perhaps a few weeks,” he said.

I was crestfallen.

In my gloom, I had a chance encounter with Ernesto (Ernie) Rondon. I asked him if the military had not tried to arrest him. He said not. But then, when I was talking to Edong an hour earlier, Edong was very certain that Ernie was in the primary list. “In fact,” he had told me, “if I could see Ernie again, I should warn him.”

The list! Always the list! Who could have prepared this list of the damned?

There was some intermission to break the tension.

I had to read on Teilhard de Chardin for my speech in the afternoon before the United Nations Association of the Philippines. Prof. Emy Arcellana of UP spoke on the government aspect, while NEDA Sec. Vicente Valdepeñas spoke on the economic aspect of de Chardin’s works. O.D. Corpuz of UP did not appear but Mrs. Hizon of St. Joseph’s College pitched in for him and talked about education. Afterwards, I made a summary of the papers presented and my interpretation of Chardin’s general vision.

My former English professor, J.D. Constantino, T.O.C.G., of the Carmelite Order, was ecstatic about my presentation. She announced that I was her candidate for president of the UP. She told the audience that I would be excellent for president. Later, she told me in confidence that last year, when there was talk of S.P. Lopez resigning as president of the state university, she had batted for me. She addded that some people had thought that I was too young for it, but now she said she would put me up again for the presidency.

It was very gratifying. Miss Constantino and I had always been quite close. She is a highly spiritual woman.

Letty Ramos-Shahani, that very intelligent foreign affairs official, who graduated from Wellesley College and the Sorbonne, gave me a tremendous buildup in her introduction. In fact, the introduction was unduly flattering and unmerited. But the lecture was very well received. I was so happy over this that for a while, I even forgot, my problem with the military!

As I was leaving the session hall in the afternoon, I heard somebody calling me, “Caesar! Caesar!” It turned out to be Nita Lichauco, Queen of Ding’s household. Surprisingly, she appeared to be in very high spirits.

“You know, Ding is having a ball in the stockade. Everyone seems to be well-treated in the stockade,” she blurted. She thought they will grow stronger because the lights are out by 10:00 o’clock in the evening, and they have to get up at 5:30 o’clock in the morning for their exercise. The food is good and they live in the gym in several bunkers.

“What are you trying to tell me?” I asked in jest. “That Ding’s nocturnal escapades have come to an abrupt end?”

“I also saw Joe Concepcion in the stockade drinking his Royal True Orange,” Nita laughed, then continued, “Last night, the home of Father (Pacifico) Ortiz was raided; according to rumors, he would be arrested tonight.”

Didn’t Rizal write that laughter is the best means of concealing pain?

And why should such a civic-minded do-gooder like Joe Concepcion be there? I mused. He might break down. He is a boy scout. He would have some rightist tendencies, all right, but then he is a business tycoon, after all. But he is also community-service oriented, striving to be a Christian in his own way. It seems to be quite unfair.

I related the story to Rebeck later. He was also taken by surprise. How could Joecon be possibly arrested? Possibly because he has been undertaking so many opinion polls and surveys?

Our concern for Joecon was soon superseded by sad musings over our own fate.

If guys like Joecon could be taken, Rebeck said, it is quite possible that many of us will be taken, too.

Now my poor brother is almost resigned to the possibility of joining Joecon and Ding in the stockade.

January 12, 1942

HQ, Intelligence Service

Bataan

 

Met Leonie Guerrero, Salvador Lopez, and Vero Perfecto as I was leaving the command post of the 2nd regular division.

Leonie will be assigned to our unit, Lopez to Corregidor and Perfecto will join the Signal Corps in Little Baguio.

Brought Leonie to our HQ. He and I are in the same tent. The General has assigned Fred, Leonie and I to job of putting out daily news sheet for soldiers in Bataan and Corregidor. Name suggested for publication is “See you in Manila”. Corregidor will furnish us with paper, stencils will be provided by Philippine Army Headquarters in Mariveles. Romulo called up and said the appointment of Leonie is in process. He will be made 1st lieutenant, Lopez will also be 1st lt. and Perfecto, sergeant.

Visited hospital in Base Camp. The sick were in make-shift bamboo beds. Many are afflicted with malaria. Others with dysentery. Some are suffering from bullet-wounds, others from shrapnel injuries sustained during shelling and bombardment. Every day hundreds of boys are being brought to hospital. Doctors in hospital work 24 hours. Medicine used are leaves of plants and herbs. Doctors know when there is heavy fighting in front due to truckful of wounded brought to hospital while fighting is in progress. It is a heart-rending sight to see boys with open wounds diving on the sand when planes fly overhead. Wounds have to be cleaned all over again. Many shell-shocked cases. Sulfa-thiasol works miracles to injuries. But supply is very limited now. Some boys are suffering from vitaminosis. Weighed myself in hospital. I have lost ten pounds already. Got some quinine. I think I have malaria.

 

(later)

 

Name given to Jap observation plane by boys: “FOTO JOE!” Name given to our mess hall “Tom’s Dixie Kitchen”. Between ourselves we call the General “B.P.” e.g. “Buck Private.”

December 30, 1941

I was privileged today, Rizal Day, to witness the oath-taking ceremony, for their 2nd term of Pres. Quezon and VP Osmeña before Chief Justice Jose Abad Santos outside the Corregidor Tunnel entrance. It was a solemn but brave ceremony for only yesterday, Corregidor was bombed by 54 enemy planes for an hour before noon and some of the craters are visible from where we sat. Quezon’s Yacht “Casiana” anchored off North Wharf was a direct hit and sunk but the Philippine flag still flies from her mast above water. I was caught halfway on my way to the Tunnel, jumped to a ditch, endured an hour of bombings with those scary hissing sounds. I was badly shaken by the experience with many killed or wounded in the area where I was.

Quezon made a stirring speech exhorting our people to fight the invaders.

Aside from the Quezon family, the MacArthurs and the Sayres, among those I saw in the ceremony were:  Lt. Col. Andres Soriano, Majors Carlos Romulo & Sid Huff; Capts. Jess Villamor, S. P. Lopez & J. B. Magluyan; Lts. F. Isidoro, L. M. Guerrero, N. Reyes, B. Cabangbang, & A. Aranzaso.

After the ceremony, I ordered my crew to retrive the Phil. flag still flying on the mast of the sunken “Casiana” because Pres. Quezon expressed a desire to have it.  While near the “Casiana” I noticed her auxiliary boat “Baler” under water.  I decided to salvage the boat,  towed it to Lamao and suggested to Capt. Magluyan who was with me to have it fixed to augment the “Danday.”  Magluyan is one of the Lamao Beach Defenders in Bataan under Capt. Jurado, C.,OSP.

Late in the afternoon, I got a copy of directive saying  “effective Jan. 1,1942,the Q-Boats will be under operational control of G-3, USAFFE HQ, Ft. Mills.”