July 9, 1942

Invited to a pancitada by Dr. Gregorio San Agustin at a dinner by the Bureau of Animal Industry to some 20 Japanese veterinarians.

Fukada, Naric Supervisor-de-Facto, notified me that all goods of the National Trading Corporation at 1010 Azcarraga had been taken by the Army.

Told Philip to stop listening to foreign broadcasts. You can’t trust the servants.


June 16, 1942

Talked to Fukada regarding Mr. Inada. I told Fukada that Inada must be told to change his arrogant ways. He cannot treat Filipinos like dogs. Personally, he has not been rude to me. But I resent his rudeness to fellow Filipinos.

Fukada asked me to be patient.

The Japanese are thinking of introducing Hori rice. They are excited about it. Hori rice seems more glutinous.

Walked home. Walking is a good exercise.

 


June 13, 1942

Mr. Fukada ordered the removal of all pictures of President Manuel Quezon from the Naric. He explained that this was in line with a suggestion issued by Malacañan a month ago.

Presented my resignation again.

Refused again.

 


May 24, 1942

Inspected markets with Fukada and Sulit.

Mr. Nakashima took his ruler and started hitting a man who did not obey him immediately. Whenever I hear of these things, my blood boils. Told Mr. Fukada, Japanese Supervisor, to tell the Japanese staff not to raise their hands on Filipino employees. Otherwise I will not be responsible for what might happen. I pointed out.

It rained last night. I sleep well on rainy nights.

 


May 18, 1942

Mt. Fukada ordered an increase in the number of rice dealers.

Ration at present is two gantas every four days.

Chairman Vargas desires the opening of rice distribution unit at the Mandaluyong cockpit in front of his residence. Will refer matter to the Japanese Supervisor.

Read Chairman Vargas’ speech after the parade held on May 18, 1942, “in celebration of the capture of Bataan and Corregidor.” He said in part:

“We are grateful for this victory because it has vindicated all Asiatic peoples whose rights and genius have been denied due recognition by Occidental civilization.

“More than the most enthusiastic congratulations, this moment calls for a strong avowal of gratitude for all that this victory means to us, for through the victory of Japan, the Philippines and the Filipino people have been spared further destruction and suffering.

“In the name of the Filipino people, I wish to congratulate you, on this memorable occasion, our warm congratulations on the astounding victory of the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy and our profound gratitude for the generosity and sympathetic understanding which the military authorities have consistently shown in the direction of our affairs.”

At that same moment, hundreds of Filipino soldiers were dying in the concentration camp in Capaz.

 


April 16, 1942

Mauricio Cruz told my brother that a certain captain stated that he saw my son Philip 3rd embarking on a boat for Corregidor. On the other, Jorge de Leon, Jr. called me up and stated that together with his uncle, Luis Dizon, PASUDECO’s secretary, he was able to talk to my son, in San Fernando, Pampanga. He said Philip had fever and malaria.

Dr. Antonio Vasquez offered to accompany me to San Fernando. He gave me some quinine which is at present worth its weight in gold. But he said it is better not to give any medicine if it is malaria, because this causes a tendency to hide the disease due to the formation of spores. He stated that I should not worry because the Malarial cases from Bataan are of the mild type because it is still the dry season. Malaria becomes fulminant during the rainy season, he revealed.

Mr. Fukada said he was not able to secure a pass for me to San Fernando. He stated that the High Command does not want to give privileges to anybody. “If they give to one they must give to all,” he said.

Chairman Jorge B. Vargas offered me his car. He asked one of his Japanese aides if he would be willing to accompany me even if I did not have a permit. The Japanese was willing to take the chance.

Later in the evening, Mr. Fukada called me up in the house. He said: “Better postpone your trip, doctor. The prisoners now being sent to different concentration camps. Plenty confusion there. No names. Send to Capaz and everywhere. Better wait.”

Still later in the evening, Gregorio Nieva phoned: “My son Tony was seen entering Bilibid at about 6 p.m. Maybe your son is with him.”

Mary left for Cabanatuan. There is also a concentration camp there. She said she would see what she can do from there.

This is like looking for a needle in a haystack.


April 14, 1942

Received a phone call from Joe Escaler, Jr. He came from San Fernando, Pampanga. He said he saw my son Philip with several thousand captives. My Japanese supervisor, Mr. Fukada, was beside me when I received the news. He congratulated me and I thanked him. I asked him if he could secure a permit for me so that I can look for my son. He said he would take the matter up with the High Command.

Received a letter from an old friend, Augusto Gonzalez. It was a letter of condolence. He heard Philip died…

Tuned in on KGEI. The commentator paid tribute to the defenders of Bataan and extended sympathies to the parents of those who perished in the fight.

My barber was very lonely. His two sons were reported killed by machinegun fire in Aglaloma, Bataan. After my haircut, a Japanese wanted a shave. My barber refused. He told me: “I better not shave him. I might slit his throat.”


March 30, 1942

Must employ a good interpreter. Misunderstandings arise out of the inability to understand each other’s language.

Had a tense showdown with the new Japanese supervisor, Mr. Fukada. He called me to his desk. I told him to come to mine instead. He didn’t seem to understand. I told him straight: “If you want anything from me, you come to my desk; if I want something from you, I’ll go to yours.” He stood up and came to my desk.

Don’t give an inch if you don’t want to lose a yard.

 


March 27, 1942

Noya has been replaced by Mr. Fukada as Supervisor. Noya was all right. He was not arrogant and we got along quite well. There must be a code of gallantry between generals. A friend of mine told me that when General MacArthur left for Corregidor he left his room in the Manila Hotel just as it was. “As if he just went out for a walk,” my friend related. “His books were in the shelves, some on top of the tables and his clothes and even his decorations were left as they were. There was obviously no effort to hide anything.” My friend said General MacArthur left a little note to the commander-in-chief of the Japanese forces entrusting his belongings to him. The Japanese general, in turn, has not touched Gen. MacArthur’s room. “And he has ordered the Manila Hotel Manager,” recounted my friend, “to see to it that nobody touches anything in the room.” The age of chivalry has not passed.