November 5, 1943

President Laurel again flew to Tokyo, this time accompanied by Ministers Recto and Paredes, to attend the East Asian Congress of all independent nations of the Sphere. The Congress was to draft a manifesto, a sort of Pacific Charter, synthesized in five points which, like mathematics, lacked being and extension, and repeated ad societatem the..

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October 27, 1943

Our guests were leaving the College, going French style. They took with them all that was theirs and all that was ours. Among the latter were chairs, beds, tables, cabinets, the refrigerator, bulbs, lamp shades, all amounting to thousands of pesos, specially now that they were irreplaceable. We were disillusioned by the belief that independence..

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October 21, 1943

Six months have elapsed since I have written and many events have taken place. On May 15, I went to St. Paul’s hospital for a much-needed rest. I remained there for three weeks. While I was there, a Mrs. Davis (an American from the concentration camp) was admitted. She was suffering from a kidney ailment...

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October 20, 1943

The text of the Alliance Treaty between Japan and the new Government was published today. The pact was signed by Ambassador Murata and Mr. Recto who was today named Minister of State. One farcical fact hiding behind the formalities of protocol was that the treaty was dated October 14, that is, the very day when the..

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Friday, October 15, 1943

We are working on the barracks—I truly believe that some transfer, including you, will take place within the near future, six weeks or less. I love you, Darling. If there's anything worth doing well in this world it's to love and adore you, my darling little wife for the rest of my days. I am..

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October 15, 1943

Officially the Philippines is independent. But is she? Yesterday, during and after the ceremonies, many young people were asking us: "Do you believe that we will have a true independence?" To all of them, we gave the same reply, "Let us wait for the facts to speak for themselves." Even the most optimistic does not..

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October 14, 1943

From now on, the Philippines is free, sovereign and independent. Japan so proclaimed, and President Laurel so announced. The inauguration was a family affair. Only the Japanese representatives were invited: aside from Mr. Murata who up to now is chief adviser of the military administration and henceforth to be the ambassador plenipotentiary; the Vice President of..

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October 14, 1943 (Thursday)

Philippine Independence Day! Today we woke up in highest spirits. We marched to school bearing “home-made” Filipino flags prepared last night by the group at Hongoryo. The Filipino “propaganda corps,” too, posted attractive placards on the school’s bulletin board announcing in bold characters the Philippines’ Declaration of Independence. We were all so excitedly happy that..

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