November 29, 1944

Camp energy had reached a dangerously low ebb. School had to be closed as students and teachers were far too hungry and weak to concentrate on their work. We were facing a new problem. Fuel shortage. The camp’s and private supply of charcoal was nearly exhausted, and already many people were chopping up chairs, desks,..

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November 26, 1944

The frequent visits of our bombers pepped us up. Today we watched many of our raiders diving and dropping their bombs, and when one of our bombers burst into flames, we were sick with anguish. Frantically, we watched for the parachute to open, but we watched in vain. The disabled plane plummeted downward and disappeared..

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November 25, 1944

Distressingly tired and ill again, and though I tried to conceal it from Catesy, I knew that he knew. Knowing that he was worried about my eating only increased my nervousness as I tried to swallow the rice mush. If I could only stay in bed to get some strength, but nurses and doctors were..

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November 22, 1944

The hungrier we became, the more we talked about the expected arrival of the Red Cross kits. The Nips were approached today by our patient Mr. Grant and other camp leaders regarding our food situation. As representatives and spokesmen for the camp, these outstanding men had taken insults and abuse from our jailors since the..

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November 21, 1944

We had eleven new cases of bacillary at the kids’ hospital, and as I doled out the sulfa to the kids, I took twice the dosage for myself. It was heartbreaking to see with what eagerness these poor kids swallowed the pills. They never had to be coaxed to take their medicine. To these poor..

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November 20, 1944

Who would have thought a year ago that rice would become so precious? We had another cut in our rice ration. Kay's delicate sister sold her last keepsake from her husband, a military prisoner at nearby Bilibid. It was her diamond engagement ring. One diamond ring for several pounds of dirty rice! She and her..

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November 19, 1944

We always expected our bombers on Sunday and they didn't disappoint us today. Again, the Manila harbor area received a great deal of punishment, and though the consistent and steady firing of enemy aircraft resounded throughout the city, we didn't see any of our bombers hit. Today our bombers were at a considerable distance over..

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November 17, 1944

How desperately we wanted to believe the Luzon landings! How closely we watched the actions of the Nips in here, in the hopes that they'd give themselves away. Two deaths today. One of them was Mr. Greenshoes, and because Mrs. Greenshoes had lost her devoted husband and slave, she was removed to the hospital.

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