October 29, 1944

The press proclaimed in bold lines: "American Bombing in Leyte Ceases". "In the face of a terrific Japanese attack, the American fleet had abandoned the landing troops which are facing complete annihilation. American forces in the Pacific have been completely destroyed and Manila is going to be spared attacks for a long time." I was..

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August 19, 1944

Requiem masses are being celebrated in different churches in Manila in memory of the late President Quezon whose birthday we commemorate today. The masses are well-attended, in spite of the fact that invitations had been secretly made, for fear of the Japanese mascots who might consider the ceremonies hostile. In the past, only the President..

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December 24, 1943

The Vice-Rector of Letran College has returned from a trip to the South. According to him, the guerrillas are continuing their war activities although there is a prevailing state of no belligerence. The pacified zone extends some more into Cebu and Panay, but in both zones, peace is uncertain. The embers of hostility continue glowing..

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October 27, 1943

Our guests were leaving the College, going French style. They took with them all that was theirs and all that was ours. Among the latter were chairs, beds, tables, cabinets, the refrigerator, bulbs, lamp shades, all amounting to thousands of pesos, specially now that they were irreplaceable. We were disillusioned by the belief that independence..

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July 5, 1943

An unpleasant incident took place yesterday in Letran. Two officers and an interpreter came to the office which, as it was the first day of classes, was then filled with school children and their parents. They were asking a Filipino teacher of Nippongo why he wrote a letter in Japanese, on our instance, telling our..

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November 11, 1942

Letran celebrated its alumni day very simply last Sunday. As a matter of fact, it was more successful and better-attended than could have been expected. The University of Santo Tomas also celebrated its University Day today, but not without incidents. Before the war, on this day, the establishment of the Commonwealth was also commemorated. The..

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July 18, 1942

We had to suspend the special high school classes, after learning that other colleges which opened similar classes had been investigated and ordered to close. The new regime does not approve of gatherings of young people without its permission. However, we obtained permission to continue with the classes in the secretarial course, which consists of..

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July 16, 1942

Yesterday, the college was officially opened. Instead of the 900 students we used to have, we now have only 90, including the special high school students. Apparently the people have become indifferent to studies, and the school no longer attracts as before. The students are noticeably serious. The uncertainty and torment surrounding them has left..

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July 15, 1942

The Bureau of Private Schools sent us notice that we had been authorized to re-open elementary classes. At the end of a month and a half of inspection, questions, scrutiny of textbooks, and after we had lost all hope of securing authorization since the building was partly occupied by the Army, we received notice that..

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