The debate on taking the Philippines out of the war: January 28 to February 12, 1942

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="369"] Mrs. Aurora A. Quezon, Mrs. Jean Faircloth MacArthur, President Manuel L. Quezon, Arthur MacArthur, Maria Aurora Quezon, Corregidor, 1942.[/caption] (entry updated January 25, 2016) The beginning of World War 2, despite the immediate setback represented by Pearl Harbor, was greeted with optimism and a sense of common cause between Americans and..

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June 5, 1945 Tuesday

Rumors continue circulating that Pres. Osmeña was coming. There seems to be no foundation for it. For the first time, a moving picture was shown inside our compound. War pictures were shown to us and they explained why the Americans attain victory after victory without sacrifice of many lives. Their equipment are modern and effective...

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May 23, 1945 Wednesday

Today, we are sad. In the issue of "Free Philippines" of May 17, 1945 Miss Margaret Parton of the New York Herald Tribune reports certain remarks made by Secretary Maximo Kalaw of Public Instruction and Information, who was in the U.S. as member of the Filipino delegation to the United Nations Security Conference held in..

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April 29, 1945 Sunday

It was 3 o'clock in the morning; the boat started to move. We could not see anything; it was pitch black. Destination unknown. In the dark, the events of the past days came back to me. We left Irisan, a town about six kilometers from Baguio on April 12, 1945 headed towards Agoo, an American-captured..

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15th April 1945

As was to be expected, a Japanese newspaper (in this case the Mainichi) has brought up the inevitable "Roosevelt has died. It was heaven’s punishment. As the incarnation of American imperialism he had a cursed influence on the whole of mankind." The English edition of the same paper added today: "He was undoubtedly the outstanding..

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13th April 1945

Friday the 13th: San Francisco radio flashed the news of President Roosevelt’s sudden death and for once Tokyo picked it up immediately: the bulletin was on the air by noon. The Japanese and I talked to did not seem unduly elated; they know by now that nothing would affect the prosecution of the war by the..

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November 15, 1944

Rumor says that Yamato has admitted that Roosevelt is elected. Don was working in the garden near the road when several Filipino boys passed by and one threw over his shoulder, "The Marines have landed, Sir." Whether he meant Leyte or Luzon, we do not know, but they all know it, think we should too...

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