January 17, 1945

I won't write lying down tonight. The same breakfast except that I starved myself last night and saved a few pieces of camote to mix with the mush. It improves the flavor. Of course, I had tea, and that helped. Lunch -- a ladle of thin soup made of camote leaves and vines. Looked like..

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25 December 1944

We have been reunited with the remainder of the group which we now find was in Cine Building in San Fernando. Yesterday morning we were led up in the prison court yard and marched in a column of fours after having received a meager meal at the railroad station in San Fernando. Our boys certainly..

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24 December 1944*

*In the source material online, written as "23 December," but appearing between entries for 23 and 25 December; the Philippine Diary Project assumes this is a simple typographical error and uses the date 24 December for this entry accordingly. The Japanese have lived up to their policy that we will receive cooked rice. In the..

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20 December 1944

We have now been on the tennis court for five days, during this period we have been issued three level mess spoons of uncooked rice per day. Some salvage Japanese under clothing was finally brought and our men most in need received either some old under-drawers or the Japanese cotton issue shirt. At about 12:00..

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December 17, 1944

Landings in Mindoro. Heard people talking about it in street-corners yesterday afternoon. The news spread like wild-fire: landings in Mindoro, Mindoro, Mindoro. The Japs are stumped. American planes had complete dominion of the air over Luzon. They kept flying over Manila all day yesterday. From the morning of December 15th to the evening of December..

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November 7, 1944

Evacuees from Manila told us that last Sunday, the 5th of the month, was a record peak in the number and intensity of bombings. From sunrise to sunset some ten waves of bombers sowed their explosives over predetermined targets. A dozen pairs of ships were among their victims, aside from various gun positions. Yesterday, the..

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Pangasinan, December 11, 1942

I left for Northern Luzon. Filipino policemen, by order of Japanese officials, meticulously checked all our luggages for arms and subversive documents. There has been a lot of smuggling of rifles and pistols these past weeks, and the guerilla activities were increasing, so that the Japanese have to keep a closer watch. The trip by..

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August 1, 1942

While Manila and the surrounding towns enjoy peace—more neronic than octavian, though—in many provincial towns, anarchy and violence reign. In those towns where the Japanese have not established a garrison and there are plenty of lawless men, there is no security in the fields nor in the lives of the inhabitants, especially the rich ones...

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