October 20, 1944

It is like a squirrel cage [here], round and round, getting nowhere except every day a slight slipping backward, that losing feeling. How many millions go through  life with it --hideous insecurity and malnutrition which makes only half a person. There were distinct changes of attitudes toward Americans among the Japanese who stayed here any..

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October 12, 1944

Jerry, Charles Bary, and Clark are the Investigating Jury. Eighteen chickens and many eggs have been missing since February. It goes back months, so that it involves more than this one white rooster. No one wants to tell or be a witness, each tries to avoid a share in clearing it up. No one wishes..

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September 15, 1944

I could hear Mr. Tomibe’s military bellow voice from here at 7:30 as he made his farewell speech to roll call assembly. He said we had become friends under difficult conditions of war and  he hoped that after peace we could be friends again under better conditions. He was now transferred to Manila to another..

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September 9, 1944

Miss McKim tells of the Committee giving a farewell coffee and cookies party for Tomibe. He is going to be head of Trade and Commerce (former position). They are severe with him over the two escapes. He told them that whenever an American made up his mind to get away, no fence or guards or..

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June 17, 1944

At 10 A.M. the new school building was dedicated, turned over to the Committee, students and teachers by the Commandant and his staff. Mr. Tomibe in uniform made a brief speech translated by Miss McKim, presenting the new building in which he hoped we would find a little little happiness though it lacked perfection due..

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June 4, 1944

We have 2 eggs apiece these days, while we have the cash and they can be bought. We are storing up internally. June and I were sitting on a bench taking sun bath when along came Bunshiyocho Tomibe, as he likes to be called. He came up from the hospital with Saito san, passing us...

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June 3, 1944

Sign on the Board: "Since the term 'Jap' is considered an insult, the Command requests that in conversation when you refer to the Japanese the term 'Japanese' and not 'Jap' be used." The Safety Committee is doing a good job. They have put up a large iron bar with a gong-ringer above it, hung out..

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May 25, 1944

From the Minutes of May 23. "No word that cannot be found in the dictionary may be used on monthly correspondence cards. . . . The shortage of rice amounted to 731 kilos. The Sergeant promised to supply us with 400 kilos, which would allow the camp to go on half rations for the balance..

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