February 3, 1950

Saw Bonnie Liu (Mrs. Sycip) in her I.R.O. office. To Custom House where I spent most of morning. Had long talk with Alfredo V. Jacinto, Commissioner of Customs. He makes a good impression. The Customs has recently discharged 180 employees, each of whom apparently has a political sponsor who is trying to save the job..

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2/8/45

The PCAU Units - Capt. Green & Maj. MacKinsey - fed us from their gasoline ranges this A.M. There is much griping about "seconds" from the pts. They can't realize that they can't eat a full messkit of stateside food as they would with rice. There was much artillery fire on our part the last..

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2/7/45

Things couldn't have ‘gone worse if I had. tried this A.M.; clothes dirty, unshaved for 2 days, the hospital littered with debris & in come Gen. MacArthur & Staff. He was very nice- visited all the wards & the internees, shook hands with dozens, talked to a few of his old soldiers etc. - many..

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Feb. 5, 1945

I was awakened by feminine shrieks of delight and men’s cries of “Hooray!” Little Walter came rushing in calling to his mother, “Mummie, come, come! Do you want to see a real live Marine? They are here.” I was too worn down to go out and join the crowd, so I just rested there letting..

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Feb. 4, 1945

About 10 A.M. we saw Carl go out the gate to join Major Wilson in receiving orders and release from Major Ebiko and Yamato, who at last satisfied his correct soul by turning us over with all the proper formality. About noon Carl came back and we were all called into the main corridor. We crowded about..

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2/4/45

The sound of tanks running, artillery firing, and small arms explosions continued unabated until about 2AM. The fires burned until everything was burned up. Great clouds of saffron colored smoke reflected the light. Finally everything quieted down, except in the distance where heavy artillery was in action. But the Yanks with tanks with steaks and cakes had..

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Feb. 4, 1945

Just after tenko last evening we heard considerable M.G. fire. This continued and increased in intensity. There was marked activity throughout the night - small arms probably tanks and light artillery demolition, pyrotechnics, fires etc. Everyone was inside from 7:00 P.M. on but little sleeping was done. The Japanese guards in the compound were on..

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Jan. 10, 1945

Rather quiet day with moderate air activity - thus all personnel in and out of buildings due to frequent ringing of bell. Conference with Col. Vanderboget and Col. J.S. Craig concerning Franz Weisblatt, supposedly a U.P. correspondent. He is a trouble maker talks too much, is always taking down information and witnesses names etc. However,..

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