Saturday, Jan. 6, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_008

Conference at Malacanang — 11:00 to 1:15

Present — Sec Sison, Valdes, Francisco, Lim, Garcia, Segundo, [illegible], De Jesus

Subject — Justification of proposed cut of budget. Loss of confidence in MacArthur expressed by the Pres. He expects MacArthur to pull out when budget is reduced.

McA failures — He failed to tell Pres. that 16 million is only for training purposes. He failed to explain Mindanao defense. He places too much confidence on contingencies that may not happen.

Trend of the President’s thoughts —

1. Country can not defend itself under present plan

2. Money could be better used by altering present plans.

3. Peoples that have interest in the govt must be the ones to be prepared as then they shall defend the govt.

4. Interest of American armament — to be able to dictate terms of peace at end of war.

5. Japanese interest — to share in wealth of country, to be master of the Orient. Pres. Q does not believe Japan will come to the Phil and risk a war with America as America is one of her best trade customers.

Pres. Q. requests the General Staff to exert its utmost to provide the countrys defense after McA. leaves.

Pres. Q. argues with Gen. Staff memo on reduction of budget. The Army needs as presented are considered vital by him.

 

 

 

Played Polo today —


Thursday, January 4, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_006

 

General Conference at Malacanang — 10:30-1:00

Subject — Defensibility of Islands —

Present: Sec. Sison, McA, Sutherland, Lim, Garcia, Segundo, [illegible], De Jesus, Magtoto — President Q Presiding–

Discussion — Pres. outlines history of McA. [illegible] Defensibility of Islands —

McA. quizzed by the Pres. on basis of his plan — Does it envision US.N. employment

McA. says no — He pretends his plan is self sufficient. He outlines Far Eastern balance of power as the thing that will insure independence. His opinion is six months of war, after that intervention by US or other power. He fails to answer Pres. Q on question of Mindanao —

Gen. Staff — opinion on budget reduction presented.

 

 

Called as witness. Quintero case.


Wednesday, January 3, 1940

Segundo-Daily Reminder - 1940_Page_005

Breakfast at Malacanang — 7:30 —

Present — Sec. Sison, Morato, Garcia, Segundo, President.

Subject of discussion — Army budget and possibilities —

Gen. Staff conference — 10:00 re budget reduction

I was detailed to write the report.

 

 

Worked all night in connection with Gen. Staff report re budget reduction.


July 28, 1939

News in Bulletin re Scout Officers not accepting offer.

I went to see Valdes on this news.

Valdes sent for Lim. Lim agrees with my information that news must have come from Olivares. Lim remarks it was a mistake to have called Olivares. Valdes says he called Moran and Olivares on his own hook in order to know their reactions too. He said that he made it clear to them that they were not included among those he was instructed to contact. Valdes asked me my estimate of the situation as to who will accept and who will not. I told him that all except Olivares, German, Romero, probably all will accept some with reservations some without. He spoke of the letter of Garcia A which he let us read. He said Santos has also accepted. We discussed about the best thing for Scout officers to do. I maintained that they must all show their loyalty, that it would be the best to all concerned if they accept without any rank to avoid embarrassments. Lim said he agreed with me. Valdes said that MacA will probably object as this status was the very thing that provoke the issue last September. Valdes gave an estimate of the Pres. He said that the Pres can not disown MacA acts now, but once these officers are in the Pres will do something for them.

We concluded the meeting with the promise of V. to back up the Gen Staff for higher rank for these officers. He said “absolutely” to my statement that provided he would stand by that statement that it would probably help the situation if these officers knew this stand of V. I radioed Amando telling him of this important development and that he must not miss tea at the Lims tomorrow. This is a new development.


Friday, June 23, 1939

Gen. MacArthur talks about Scout officers trying to argue and gain the point that there was no such promise about the one and the two rank in promotion. He tried to argue that the position of PS officers as determined by Valdez-Garcia-Ord board was in case they quit the USA and that their position as offered them in the damned letter was lower because they were no longer to be forced to quit their US ranks. He also said something about the WD being opposed to Mex rank of USA officers and that the position in promotion list of these officers was more or less determined by the WD. This is contrary to what Col E previously told me. Col E. also cleared up his position by saying that there was such an understanding. Lim and Garcia also said that there was such an understanding.

On my turn I said the following:

(a) That the rank given these officers by the board which he Gen MacA was allowing was not sufficient to give them the same pay even with their US retired pay.

(b) That the officers did not participate and were not heard as to their opinions about this rank and therefore it was too optimistic to presume they would accept such ranks.

(c) That Col Ord sitting in the board was probably trying to carry the understanding of placing these officers at the top of Majors above Velasco, but that he had forgotten that the Constabulary officers had already received their promotion. It must be remembered that the promise of one rank was made in 1935 before the general promotions of Constabulary officers.

(d) That I was the author of the Act 150 which gave double retirement to Gen L & Capinpin in order to ease up retirement.

(e) That there was no distinction as to the reason why there were two positions offered them — that fixed by the V-D-G board above Velasco and the one offered in letter, that quitting or not quitting the US as a condition did not enter their minds as the ultimate end was to quit the USA and that any position offered was to be their final position if and when they quit the US.

I now understood where L got his argument with me on the 13th about the failure of Scouts to get assimilated rank as due to their own hindrance. He was just helping MacA perpetuate a great hoax. McA probably told him to help him straighten the situation.


Tuesday, June 13, 1939

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lim & I almost came to blows in his office, Garcia the silent witness.

He made this statement — “The failure of the Scout officers to be given assimilated rank is not the fault of the P.I. government. It is the fault of their own hindrance.” I asked him what meant and he repeated the same statement. I told him he did not mean that and that if he meant what he said he was all wrong. I then told him that it was the fault of a law which the Scout officers here powerless to interpret –whether acceptance of PA commission would cause them to lose their US commissions. Lim talked in a manner to imply that these Scout officers should quit the way he did saying he quit the USA even though there was no retired pay coming to him and that he was going to accept the PA commission. I told him he was all “baloney” for I knew how he had opposed his own retirement and that I knew the radio he tried to send to Villamin in the name of Reyes. He tried to lie about this but he was caught cold. He tried to bluff me by saying — “Do not put into my mouth what I do not mean.” I told him to learn to say what he means, and that as long as I live nobody could blame the Scout officers for their failure to be assimilated. He grew very angry and said “Do not say that again in front of me” to which I said I was going to say what I believe as long as I am alive, and that I did not care what he did. He sobered down then.

The trouble is — Lim is trying to side with the Constabulary so that they will be for him when the choice comes for C of S. He is sacrificing the Scouts because he gets nothing from them.

Lim further said — “Do not be a lawyer for these Scouts for I am as good a lawyer for them.” I replied “I am not trying to be a lawyer for anybody. I am one of them and I am defending myself. You are a much better lawyer than I am.”

I fought today singlehanded and in turn —

Garcia, Lim, Eisenhower and Valdez who all tried to put these officers at the bottom of the Lt Cols. I proposed the higher officers to be placed in middle of Lt Cols and Joe G, Guevara, Pob. at the bottom. Lim wanted to put these last three above Velasco.

Garcia was reconciled to my recommendation so was E and V. after some argument.


Friday, June 2, 1939

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_052

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_053

Segundo-Desk Private-1938_Page_054

[page 1]

Meeting at MacArthur’s Office. Present. His staff and the general staff.

Macarthur talks at length on the history of scattered camps, trying to justify their establishment. He recognizes however the fact that in as much as the president relieves him of the political phase of the national defense, he (MacArthur) has no more alternative. He appointed a preparatory committee consisting of Eisenhower, Southerland and myself to present recommendation in a month. MacArthur insinuated that the subject of concentration was brought to the president’s attention not thru him. This was a wrong procedure, he says as when a subject is presented to the president, there should be combined agreements and opinion of all the military men concerned. Divided opinions of military men

[page 2]

on military subject always destroys the effectiveness. At the end of the conference, Lim said that when the president calls for the information direct from us, we don’t have the alternative but give the information to him, insinuating thereby that the question of concentration was asked by the president himself. This insinuation of Lim is false as Lim himself used the concentration issue as one of the causes of his resignation by claiming that on this vital issue, he would not agree with the military advisers office. (On our way to Malacañan, Lim made a remark to me in which he implied that he was the author of the concentration. This is more of Lims habitual lies. I wrote the study originally

[page 3]

without consultation with Lim. There are several other cases where Lim tried to steal credit for original ideas.