June 1, 1944

[Now] the Japanese turn nasty. They had heard the children call them Japs and complained to Carl. Now the chef, asked where some supplies came from, replies that the Japs brought it in. He is overheard by the buyer and reported. It grows into a major incident. The chef is called to the guardhouse, given..

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May 31, 1944

A letter from the Internment Camp Committee to the Bunshiyocho on May 31: "Dear Sir, on February 14, 1944, we wrote you a letter calling attention to the inadequacy of our daily food allowance. A copy is attached. At that time our medical authorities stated that the health of our camp would deteriorate if that..

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May 30, 1944

We ate our own bucaco with milk and sugar at noon, and that was all for lunch. Camp gave us bread only, no rice. We baked camotes for supper and put half a can of corned beef in soup. We had the first half for breakfast. Jerry keeps his yeast alive on sugar. With Japanese..

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May 25, 1944

From the Minutes of May 23. "No word that cannot be found in the dictionary may be used on monthly correspondence cards. . . . The shortage of rice amounted to 731 kilos. The Sergeant promised to supply us with 400 kilos, which would allow the camp to go on half rations for the balance..

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May 23, 1944

We heard early that the Japanese had decided the Family Unit for 22 more who signed up for it could go through—that the men’s lower barracks would be cleared for it, with the men moving upstairs, and any family overflow could move into the schoolhouse. This will start howls from below. If the Opposition had..

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May 22, 1944

I went to answer the three questions at the office where I received over P200 in Marie's name. It is the felt and taffeta which will feed us eggs. We repaid John first. "By Order of the Command, no more outdoor shacks of any kind are to be constructed within the camp as of today."..

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May 21, 1944

John Rasmussen, hearing we were out of money, asked Jerry if he could use P20 which Jerry clutched like a drowning man. He was able to buy a dozen eggs, bananas for our yeast, and some tomatoes. It was sweet of the old soldier to tide us over. One does not ask for loans in..

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May 20, 1944

Jim saw Marie Outside and told her to go ahead on selling clothes for us. Tonight Bea tells us that she has sold things and will send money in soon. Peg and Walter and Carl came for coffee and talk in the dugout. Then we went to the program, with Walter Neal speaking on Mexico,..

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