Sept. 24, 1972, Sunday

Marcos Diaries 1972_142 Marcos Diaries 1972_143 Marcos Diaries 1972_144

 

(1)

1:25 AM Sept. 25th

Sept. 24, 1972

Sunday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

Diokno, Chino Roces, Max Soliven etc. have filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus before the Supreme Court.

I asked Justices Claudo Teehangkee, Antonio Barredo, Felix Macasiar and Felix Antonio to see us. They insisted that the government should submit to the Supreme Court for the Court to review the constitutionality of the proclamation of martial law, Proclamation No. 1081.

So I told them in the presence of Secs. Ponce Enrile and Vicente Abad Santos as well as Sol. Gen. Estelito Mendoza that if necessary I would formally declare the establishment of a revolutionary government so that I can formally disregard the actions of the Supreme Court.

They insisted that we retain a color of constitutionality for everything that we do.

But I feel that they are still image-building and do not understand that a new day has dawned. While they claim to be for a reformed society, they are not too motivated but are too bound by technical legalism.

I have amended both Gen. Orders Nos. 1 and 3 to assume all powers of government including legislative and judicial and clearly excluded cases involving the constitutionality of my acts from the jurisdiction

 

(2)

Sept. 24th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

of the Supreme Court.

I met the cabinet to emphasize the program to reform our society.

And I signed the decree (No. 1) to promulgate the law on the Reorganization of the Government.

Tomorrow I will sign the decrees promulgating the new Civil Service Rules, the Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Law, the Land Reform Funding and dismiss some judges, the CIR judges, Public Service Commission.

We have impressed everybody with our fairness by the arrest of Cong. Roque Ablan, Rafael Aquino and Gov. Luis Bocalan.

I have ordered profiteers to be arrested.

And the ROTC boys have cleaned up the streets of graffiti.

Only KBS and the The Daily Express are operational.

 

(3)

Sept. 24th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

I just talked to Earl Mayo, the biographer and advisor of Nixon, and his first advice is to immediately meet the press as soon as possible and explain that this is not a dictatorship.

Sec. C.P. Romulo, whom I talked to again by long distance, has done a good job of holding press interviews and issuing press releases.

June 29, 1972 Thursday

[p.1]

11:00 PM

2166

June 29, 1972

Thursday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

I went to Chino Roces’ house to wish him a Happy Birthday. Arrived at 7:15 PM, left at 9:00 PM with Alex Melchor.

First much bantering and fencing specially when Sen. Ilarde, Max Soliven and the other critics arrived. Chino said that I had the massive support of the media, referring to ABS-CBN, Chronicle, Herald Bulletin etc. And I said the Manila Times was the only newspaper in the Philippines that mattered. He then laughingly declared he was going to sell the Manila Times and I answered in mock – seriousness that I would organize a group to buy it.

Delegate Napoleon Rama arrived to loudly announce “The President is not coming to see you!” then recoiled in shocked silence when he saw me laughing at him.

But later I pulled Chino off to a corner to talk to him seriously. I asked him to help me unite the country at least for the last year and a half of my administration.

He asked me to announce that even if I should be nominated I would not run.

[p.2]

2167

June 29th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

He asked me what I was willing to do to convince people that I was not interested in reelection & answered, anything provided I was not humiliated.

He claims that he is convinced that I am not going to run but that we had to convince the people. Specially since the people wanted a change of leadership. And that the next President would not be a Nacionalista. I kept my counsel to myself.

And I thought I could trace suspicion in his voice when he asked e what I would do if the peace and order situation deteriorates. Immediately I told him I would follow the advice of the Supreme Court. Perhaps suspend the visit of habeas corpus and arrest as your people but that at the end of 1973 even if there were a revolution I would step down.

He commented, “But you have to straighten things up before you step down.” And I answered “That would be the purpose but I would still step down.”

We ended up with the agreement that we would continue the dialogue.

I left before dinner.