William Draper

William Draper

(1721 — 1787) British brigadier general, colonial official.

1st to 27th of August, 1762

As Maj.-Gen. Lawrence was of opinion, that the  settlements would be in danger if more forces were  drawn from the coast, the two battalions of the company’s

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23rd September, 1762

On the twenty-third of September we anchored in Manila bay; and soon found, that our visit was unexpected; the Spaniards were unprepared.[36] To increase as

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24th September, 1762

On the morning of the twenty-fourth, we sent an ineffectual summons to the town, and, with the Admiral and other principal officers, examined the coast,

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25th September, 1762

The twenty-fifth we seized a fort which the Spaniards had abandoned, named the Polverista,[36] that proved a most excellent place of arms. For Covering the

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26th of September, 1762

Twenty-sixth. The Admiral sent on shore the battalion of seamen under the command of the Captains Collins of the Weymouth, Pitchford of the America, and

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27th of September, 1762

Twenty-seventh. The Governor sent out a flag of truce, to apologize for some barbarities committed by the savages lately mentioned, who had murdered some straggling seamen;

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28th of September, 1762

Twenty-eighth. The Governor’s nephew was landed. My secretary, Lieut. Fryar, was ordered to conduct him into the town with a flag of truce. In the

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29th of September, 1762

Twenty-ninth. The Admiral, at my request, ordered the Elizabeth, Com. Tyddyman, and the Falmouth, Capt. Brereton, to place themselves as near the town as the

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30th of September, 1762

Thirtieth. The engineers traced out Adm. Cornish’s battery for eight twenty-four pounders, on the left of St. Jago’s church; but the violence of the rains

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October 1st and 2nd, 1762

October first and second. The weather grew so very tempestuous, that the whole squadron was in danger, and all communication with it entirely cut off.

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3rd of October, 1762

Third. The weather became moderate. At daylight the battery was opened against the left face of the bastion of St. Diego, towards the saliant angle.

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4th of October, 1762

Fourth. About three hours before day one thousand of the Indians attacked the cantonment of the seamen. They were encouraged to this attempt by the

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5th of October, 1762

Fifth. Maj. Barker’s fire was so violent, that the breach appeared practicable. Our cannon from the three-gun battery silenced those of the enemy on the  orillon

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6th of October, 1762

Sixth. At four o’clock in the morning we filed off from our quarters, in small bodies, to give the less suspicion; and, by degrees, assembled

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