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Denny Williams

Denny Williams

(July 28, 1907 — April 27, 1997), American nurse-anesthetist. Served in Bataan and Corregidor; P.O.W. in Santo Tomas.

December 8, 1941

I can’t believe what I’m told and know! Mrs. Roesholm called me at 7:30 a.m. and said, “The Japanese have bombed Honolulu”. That was the

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December 10, 1941

We worked and worked and still more casualties came. This is awful! Many officers and soldiers are without arms and without Legs; now I know

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December 13, 1941

Bill came home today from Paracale. He had a hectic trip; he traveled by train in a total blackout last night. I believe he thinks

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December 18,1941

Bill went into the Army today. We didn’t discuss his decision; he knows what he wants, and I shall not voice an opinion. Many other

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December 24, 1941

During an air raid Bill and I went after an adorable puppy. She is an Australian bulldog; in my opinion the name “Lady” will suit

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December 25, 1941

It is now 1 p.m. What a Christmas! With a multitude of patients, Sternberg Hospital was in a turmoil this morning; trucks and trucks of

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December 26, 1941

Bill came by. this afternoon; he leaves tonight for Bataan. I tried not to cry, but I couldn’t help it. When he went out the

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January 1, 1942

After having escaped from the Japanese in Manila, we are practically free lancing here on Bataan; it is certainly a case of the survival of

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January 1, 1942

A Japanese observation plane, known as Photo Joe, paid us an early morning call.Evidently he photographed several trucks, cars and a some Filipino troops concentrated

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January 8, 1942

I have been so busy the past few days in our bamboo but that I have neglected my diary. We, the Lapham family and I,

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January 10, 1942

Colonel Craig sent for me to come and work here; I’m to give anesthetics at Hospital #2. I’m happy as I feel I’m doing something

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February 14, 1942

We are working like demons… Casualties from bombings and patients with malaria and dysentery are admitted in large numbers daily. food is very scant; but

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