18th April 1945

The Mainichi today carries more “last words” from suicide pilots: “Although the expression ‘shichisho hokoku’ (firm resolve to serve the nation by being born seven times) is popular nowadays, it does not apply to us. We have only one chance to strike.” — Flight Chief Warrant Officer T. “Oh, but Nippon is a beautiful country!” — Lieutenant N. “I will …

October 6, 1944

We can spend nothing but time now — our money is certainly no more good. My pay P 35 will buy 3 cups of corn or 1/3 of a chicken. Strange sounds make us think the Yanks might have been nearby this noon but we saw them not. First Jap planes in evidence today for some time. My teeth are …

July 12, 1943

Premier Tojo paid a surprise visit to the Philippines a second time. He came from Thailand and Singapore (now Syonan) where more serious matters called for his presence. Officially, all he did was annex four provinces to Siam and organize a Hindustan army to fight against the Anglo-Americans and free themselves from the British yoke. He made a stopover of …

February 17, 1942

Received regards from Mary. She is in Cabiao. Those who evacuated to the provinces had a harder time than those who stayed in Manila. The city was the safest place. Mr. Takamia, Japanese agriculturist, co-worker of Mr. Abe at Mrs. Quezon’s farm in Arayat, was sent by the Japanese authorities to Legaspi and Naga together with three of our own …

February 17, 1942

To add to the humiliation of the defeated British, the Japanese yesterday published side by side with the news of the fall of Singapore, the death sentence meted out to three Englishmen who attempted to escape from the concentration camp at Santo Tomas. The sentence was read before all the internees, and carried out four days ago. Here are some …

February 17, 1942

The morning paper gives the details of the surrender of Singapore. Bataan and Corregidor still hold. I thought I saw a moving boat in the bay today and my heart sank. Jumped to the conclusion that Corregidor had already fallen, for no boats could get into Manila Bay without passing Corregidor, and I am not optimistic enough to think that …

February 16, 1942

Martial law is severe, ruthless. It knows no leniency. Three British internees were made to dig three graves and then they were executed in the Santo Tomas concentration camp as an example to all other internees. The Britishers tried to escape. It is hard to argue with the Japanese. This morning’s Tribune carries a news item from the Manila Defense …

February 16, 1942

Yesterday, Singapore fell. At 7:50 last night, Lt. General Percival, Commander of the British Forces, signed the unconditional surrender in the prosaic stage of a Ford Motor Shop. Singapore, which had hitherto remained impregnable, still has some 60,000 soldiers, half of whom are British and Australians, the other half, Indians. In the preceding days, the press described how the British …

February 16, 1942 

Starting 11th week of this mess. They did some flying today so the field was bombed after supper. No damage. Singapore gone now. British up to their usual tactics, to the last American. Two pilots flying their first missions under Dyess dropped ammunition to cut-off USAFFE men at Jones, northern Luzon, followed by two others dropping pamphlets in central Luzon …