Jan. 7, 1900

Went down to Manila.  Saw Lawton taken to the transport from Paco cemetery.  Entered city from Malate where the Am assault took place at the capture of Manila from Sp.  Went through the walled city entering the city from the Luneta through the gate.  The Walled City or Intramurous is rather small and is chiefly taken up by churches, monasteries, convents & Gov. buildings.  It is surrounded by the walls about 30 ft high and has  gates.  The city is surrounded by a moat, now dry which are crossed by draw bridges.  Left the city by the Gate of Isabella II and crossed the Pasig by the Puenta de Espana or Bridge of Spain   (Manila is 650 mi from Hong Kong, pop 360,000 chinos, 25,000,  Sp 5000  Founded in 1581) to the new city.

Wandered down the Escolta, the Principal street of Manila which is very busy thoroughfare and crowded with native cabs called caramatas & quilizes.  The caramata is a small two wheeled vehicle looking something like a jinrickashaw with a box in front for the driver and seating two people while the quilize is also a two wheeled concern is also a two wheeled concern with a box on it in which four people sit and forward of which sits the driver.  There many saloons in the city run by Ams. and selling Schlitz beer at .10 in many of which we stopped.  There is a brewery in Manila, “The Sam Miguel” operated by English people.  They have a big beer store on the corner of the Calle San Jacinto and the Escolta.  Stopped at the Hotel Espana for dinner 7 courses for $1.00 Mex $.50 Am.  They certainly throw out a swell feed for the money.  One of the principal stores “The American Bazaar” is owned by an Am. Who started in business by selling stationary to the soldiers.  The Colegio de Santa Isabella is not much to look at.  The palace is a rather imposing building for this neck of the woods while the cathedral is rather poor outside but contains some of the finest wood carving I ever saw,  It was all executed by natives.  Went back to San Pedro in caranattas about 6 P.M

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