Monday, February 13th, 1899

It being impossible for me to keep account from day to day I will put it all in a Nutschell because I was always occupied with work allmost day and night while all the Regiment had their Hands full in trying to Keep the Enemy at Bay wich where constandly shooting away at us on account of our smal Forse we where compelled to stay where we are we therfor throwed up Entrenchment all along the line wich allready exstenden over 30 Miles and was occupied by only 8000 men in all we now laid in Trenches day and Night 10 men from each Co where alowed to goe to town each day 5 in the morning and 5 in the afternoon our wounded are doing in fine the Major is walking around and Debold and Rockwell are sitting up but still very sick during this time we have burned down thousands of Homes and have captured all Horses and Wagons within our reach and taken over 8 towns wich are all destroyed by the Heavy Shells wich Dewy put into them we also captured the Railroad and Oarshops at Caloogan on the Evening of the 11th I was send to town for the first time to get a Load of fresh Meat out the mesct morning I walked the 5 Miles when I was about 2 Miles from the City I heard 5 or 6 Shots fired along the road and at the same time I seen a Officer riding along and it was him these where intended for but none of them hit him our Filipino with a Revolver in Hand came running my way and I fired but missed him but the second Bullit went trough his Heart and down he went but unfortunate the Revolver was marked US and I had to give it up we then set fire to all the Houses in this sektion in all told we have lost Killed 65 and wounded about 300 and 2 missing but the Rebels losses are counted by the thousands good many of our Boys when found could hardly be reconised being all cut up in a terrible manner on the 12th we received Mail wich was the delivered in the Field the Boys having no paper or Envelopes wrote on Catrig. Boxes or anything they could find I send several myself we also have Killed hundreds of dogs and cats during the Engagement on the 5th we also lost 3 Horses belonging to our Regt all told it was simple Horrowfying after these Battles this is only what I witnessed myself but all other Regiments had equally the same Exsperience many Marer and Remington Rifles where captured and many Prisoner where taken among them some of Alguinaldos staff and a about 400 Indian wich used the old fashioned Arrow and Bow for weapon when captured they where all nacked and had to be dressed befor bringing them into the walled City where most of our Prisoner are Kept our 8 men wich where captured some time a go are still held prisoner by the Rebels perhapst torture to death befor this during this Engagement the following where in Hospital Lt Howard Jessy Murphie Hustead and W Howard sick or on Guard in Quarters Cuddy Collins Jno Broron Kramer Georg Miller McMaster Shrock Herrington Berry Miller Jno Barnes & Lt. Woods but who went out on the Battlefield on Febr 13th. taken to the Hospital sins the Battle Robert Curry McMaster Carl Debold and Rockwell during all these days the Weather was terrible hot and we had to carry our Water for over a Mile and then boil it but had plenty of Field Ration

It has been impossible for me to keep account from day to day. I will try to put it all in a nutshell because I was always occupied with work almost day and night. While all the regiment had its hands full in trying to keep the enemy, who were constantly shooting away at us on account of our small force, at bay. We were compelled to stay where we are. Therefore we threw up entrenchments all along the line which already extends over 30 miles and was occupied by only 8000 men in all. We now laid in trenches all day and night. Ten men from each company were allowed to go to town each day, five in the morning and five in the afternoon. Our wounded are doing fine. The Major is walking around and DeBolt and Rockwell are sitting up but still very sick. During this time we have burned down thousands of homes and have captured all horses and wagons within our reach. We have also taken over eight towns which were all destroyed by heavy shells which Dewey put into them. We also captured the railroad and oarshops at Caloocan. On the evening of the 11th I was sent to town for the first time to get a load of fresh meat out. The next morning I walked the five miles. When I was about two miles from the city I heard five or six shots fired along the road and at the same time I saw an officer riding along and it was him these were intended for but none of them hit him. One Filipino with a revolver in hand came running my way. I fired but missed him but the second bullet went through his heart and down he went. Unfortunately, the revolver was marked U.S. and I had to give it up. We then set fire to all the houses in this section. All told we have lost: killed 65; wounded about 300 and two missing. But the rebel losses are counted by the thousands. Good many of our boys, when found, could hardly be recognized since they had been cut up in a terrible manner. On the 12th we received mail which was delivered in the field. The boys, having no paper or envelopes, wrote on cartridge boxes or anything they could find. I sent several myself. We also have killed hundreds of dogs and cats during the engagement. On the 5th we also lost three horses belonging to our regiment. All told it was simply horrifying after all these battles. This is only what I witnessed myself but all the other regiments had equally the same experience. Many Mausers and Remington rifles were captured and many prisoners were taken, among them some of Aguinaldo’s staff and about 400 Indians which used the old fashioned bow and arrow for weapons. When captured, they were all naked and had to be dressed before bringing them into the walled city where most of our prisoners are kept. Our eight men who were captured some time ago are still held prisoner by the rebels and perhaps tortured to death by this time. During this engagement, the following were in hospital: Lieutenant Howard, Jessie Murphy, William Howard. Sick or on guard in quarters: Curry, Collins, John Brown, Kramer, George Miller, McMaster, Schrock, Herrington, Berry Miller, John Barnes and Lieutenant Woods but who went out on the battlefield on February 13th. Taken to the hospital since the battle, Robert Curry, McMaster, Carl DeBolt, Rockwell. During all these days, the weather was terribly hot and we had to carry our water for over a mile and then boil it. But, we had plenty of rations.